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Trade collections

Trade collections

• In this week’s column at Comic Book Resources, Augie de Blieck Jr. pokes the hornets’ nest by laying out a plan for comics fans to move from monthly issues to collected editions — and to switch from the local store to an online retailer. It’s all part of his effort to save money.

“I don’t care what on-line retailer you use,” he writes. Find one you can trust and that has a solid selection of books in stock at all times, and throw them your money. It’s a good habit to train your mind to pay for books that you don’t walk out the door with. Once you delay that instant gratification, you start thinking more about your choices and start only order the books you really want to read. You’ll find out what’s important this way.”

The column sparks discussion at the Pipeline Forum and at Comics Worth Reading, where de Blieck admits the email he’s received on the topic is “hilarious — it’s either people thanking me for the advice on a move they’d like to make in their reading habits, or retailers threatening to boycott CBR because I’m a jackass.”

• Also at CBR, Hack/Slash creator Tim Seeley considers the barriers to publishing less-expensive comics: “… there’s got to be a balance found somewhere–which is, it sells enough for the retailers to say, ‘If I devote this much rack space to it, I’ll make up for the $3.99 book’ — so you’ll have to sell three times as many. Which is tough. How do you do that? I’m pretty sure I can’t get Art Adams to draw me a book that I can sell for $1.99, or Mark Millar to write it.”

At Anime Vice, Gia Manry picks up on Seeley’s comments about telephone book-sized, manga-style anthologies as a possible alternative for American comics. However, the consensus is that the monthly comics crowd would resist the move.

• Blogger Kirk Warren goes old school by asking his readers what is their most valuable comic.

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Comments

2 Comments

Please support your local brick-and-mortar stores. If they don’t carry what you want that second, they can order it. If they get more people asking for trades and collections, they’ll carry them. It helps you’re local economy and keeps money in your community.

I still say that if a publisher put together a subscription-based multi-series anthology that had at least 2-3 series I was interested in and was affordable (even importing from Japan, my subscriptions to these manga magazines are like, $25 per 6 months- it’d be tough).

And one thing I forgot to ask both readers about: advertising. Japanese companies supplement the cost of anthologies (or try) by advertising. Not generic advertising like in an American magazine (nor anywhere near that volume), but in the beginning and ending of the books you’ll find ads for the publisher’s other products, for the trades of popular series, for merchandise of the manga (or other adaptations of said manga), etc. Which is ANOTHER thing that could work really well, but I’m guessing would probably be resisted by comic fans.

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