Robot 6

Turn Off the Dark director says Spider-Man won’t sing on Broadway

Marvel has released two videos featuring Julie Taymor, director of the Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark musical. In the first video she talks about doing research for the musical by reading a bunch of Spider-Man comics, noting that Peter Parker will sing, but once he puts on his suit, he’s all action. “…oh my God, Spider-Man singing in tights. Ain’t gonna happen,” she says.

In the second video, available after the jump, she talks about where the subtitle “Turn Off the Dark” came from.


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They’re still making musicals? What is this? 1955?

I hear they’re pretty popular on Broadway.

If you are serious, DrunkJack, then wow. Just. Wow.

Oh, I know they still these idiotic things in New York, but I hear they eat their second born male children on their first birthdays as well.

Quick, let’s all randomly break into song and choreographed dance moves! *jazz hands*

West Side Story is one of the best/worst examples of how dumb these things are, there’s ONE good song in it (Somewhere), the rest are horrid and the whole thing is absolutely mind numbingly dumb. Dancing street toughs! How am I supposed to buy into the drama when these ‘gangs’ are dancing around in unison? It’s SILLY.

Musicals should’ve gone the way of the dodo. They are quaint, silly and it’s odd that the so called cultural center of the universe still pretends people like them. New Yorkers may, and of course teenage girls and gay men, like them but the rest of us…musicals are a joke to us, they’re the stupid things we have to sit through for our gay cousin when they’re in high school. We do it out of love for the kid, but no one really likes these things.

There”s a reason movie musicals are rare these days, no one in the rest of the country likes them much, they’re dumb.

I love my gay cousin and all, but you don’t see me pretending he should care that Sleep reunited and played 2 shows last spring or that High On Fire is working on a new record. I certainly don’t see these things talked about on sites that have only tangential relationships to the product. Sure, this is a ‘Spider-Man’ musical, but I can’t think of anything I would like to see less than a Spider-Man musical. Maybe a naked Spider-Man musical starring hairy Eastern Europeans who can’t sing singing in languages I don’t understand backed by a tone deaf orchestra conducted by a blindman and featuring Diamanda Galas as Aunt May and some fruity American Idol (don’t get me started) never was as Peter Parker.

New York needs to get over itself, Broadway is a tiny little speck on the cultural landscape (like my beloved Sleep and High On Fire) 90% of the country couldn’t give two shits about these things. I dare say more people care about comic books than they do musical theater (or theater in general, actors fawn over it, but it’s such a regional thing that it means exactly jack shit to most of us).

Yet the New York based media foist this crap on us constantly. It’s as bad as Hollywood and it’s movies/tv shows about the film/TV industry. Enough already, NO ONE CARES!

Soundtrack: Local H “California Songs”

Yeah, whatever, dude.

Taymor’s Across the Universe is one of my favorite movies of the last decade, so I would totally go see her Spider-Man musical, if’n I could afford it.

i’m a straight male in my late 20s, and i LOVE musicals. admittedly, i’m also an actor and grew up doing theatre so it’s hardwired into my system, but even just being in the audience or talking to people after a performance, there’s something absolutely magical about musicals in all their variety…a connecting social experience, a collaborative synthesis of multiple art forms into a singular storytelling medium that has existed in one form or another for as long as there’s been theatre. so, yeah, breaking into song and dance can be incredibly powerful and moving. i think New York’s doing just fine, movie musicals do very well when they’re well made and if anyone needs to get over themselves, it’s you and those like you without the capacity to see that just because YOU personally don’t care for musicals (which is entirely your right), that doesn’t mean the rest of the world shares your opinion.

and West Side Story rules. ;) can’t wait for Turn Off the Dark. i really hope it’s awesome. :)

They’re still making comic books? What is this? 1955?

Oh, wait, I forgot—comics are a vital and versatile art form, often underestimated by the general public. They’re also a very specifically American art form. They also require a surprising amount of talent and effort to produce at all, let alone execute well. They’re also frequently derided for their peculiar conventions and their stereotypically facile and childish subject matter by people who don’t understand the difference between form and content, and who truly know nothing about either.

Comics are very much like musicals in all those respects, aren’t they?

Boy..good thing you were here DJ…I’m gonna call the Denver Performing Arts Center and let them know no one cares about musicals.. Everyone call the similar organization in your city. Be sure to let the schools in your area know too.

Whew..that was close.

Wow. DrunkJack. Wow. That’s hilarious, and not in a way that flatters you.

Across the Universe? Was that that Beatles Karaoke movie? This woman made that? Jeez, I thought they would’ve drummed everyone associated with that act of artistic necrophilia out of the entertainment industry. Hey, let’s take a big heaping shit on the Beatles songbook for fun and a loss!

Sorry, man, I know the truth hurts, but musicals are dead. Deader than comics. Everyone else has moved on.

I mean, look at what the big musicals have been in the past 20 years, all adaptions of movies, TV shows, commercials, whatever. Can’t wait for Manimal, The Musical! Just after Where’s The Beef!?A Journey In Song. Aren’t they doing some mess with hair bands now? Real cool, real fascinating original stuff, there.

Rent? Failed as a film. No one cared.

Mamma Mia? Never underestimate the stupefying power of Abba.

Hairspray? Can only be the fact that the original film was so good people were willing to give a third generation xerox a try. I don’t understand it, but people do lots of stupid things. I sure hope John Waters got a mess of money from that atrocity.

Way to cherry-pick there, JD. Leaving out Chicago, Sweeney Todd and Moulin Rouge!, just to name three musical films off the top of my head that were critical and commercial successes.

Of course, all of that is ignoring that the Spidey musical is a stage play, like most musicals, and not a film like all of your examples. But I’m willing to bet that you’ve never seen a stage play, let alone a musical on stage, so you wouldn’t know about The Last Five Years, Floyd Collins, Parade, Urinetown, Assassins, Avenue Q, Sunday in the Park With George, Into The Woods, The Wild Party, et cetera et cetera et cetera.

Ahh, but if you watched the marketing of Sweeney Todd it never once hinted that it was a musical. None of the commercials showed the singing. Talk about cherry picking…

And Chicago? *shrug* Moulin Rouge? *projectile vomits*

What about High School Musical!?!

Point proven. Musicals should be outlawed for the good of all mankind.

Stage plays are elitist. Which is why New Yorkers fawn over them and pretend they should matter to the rest of the country, it makes them feel superior that they can go waste $300 on a bunch of nobodies making fools of themselves.

I’m sorry, maybe it’s that musicals are like the perfect storm of everything I loathe in ‘culture’ (soulless perfunctory music, hammy acting, elitist coastal douchebags, much like films/tv shows about the film/television industry) seriously man, being accosted with this subject matter on a comic book website is about as annoying as coming here and seeing a story about…Britney Spears or something.

Pushes my buttons, so I push back.

Wait, what? You’re saying that an entire art form is silly, quaint, worthless to anyone outside of New York and should go the way of the dodo, but it’s PLAYS that are elitist? Now that, my friend, is hypocrisy.

What’s elitist about theatre? It’s bloody and violent, full of crude and crass humor, loaded with sex and appeals to the lowest common denominator—or at least, it does if you’re watching the right plays. Just like if you’re watching the right movies or TV shows or reading the right novels or books. Or, if that’s not what you’re looking for, there’s theatre that is genteel or polite. Or whatever it is you want. Just like any other art form. Once again, you’re deliberately conflating medium with content. If your only experience with comics was old Daffy Duck comics, you could say that all comics are written for kids and are crudely produced, artistically bankrupt nonsense whose only purpose is to sell toys and Hostess Fruit Pies. But that’s ridiculous, and I’m guessing that you know that, since you’re trolling on a website about comic books.

You also seem to think that the only place theatre is performed or seen is in New York. I guarantee that, wherever you live in the world, there’s an operating professional theatre within 100 miles. I actually happen to agree with you that a lot of Broadway theatre is over-produced and pandering—which I why I get my theatre elsewhere, along with millions of average Americans who love the form. And, yes, that includes musicals.

As for the reason CBR is covering this particular musical: you say this is a comic book website, and that this play is an off-topic diversion—but it’s a play based on a famous and popular comic book character. Do you rail against coverage of Iron Man 2 with cries of “this is a comic book site, not a movie site,” or news about Batman: Arkham Asylum with “leave the video games to IGN?” I doubt it.

As for Sweeny Todd, I agree—they should have marketed it as a musical. That way, it would have been clearer that it’s based on a famous and popular stage musical that was first produced in 1979. But then I hear from D-bags like you who rail against something they clearly know nothing about, and I begin to understand their decision…

And to go back to the subject of elitism for a moment: your posts display an obvious contempt and condescension toward homosexuals and an outright hostility toward New Yorkers, people of a higher level of education than yours or people whose taste in entertainment varies from yours in any way. Those are all elitist attitudes as well, and are once again hugely hypocritical.

“And to go back to the subject of elitism for a moment: your posts display an obvious contempt and condescension toward homosexuals and an outright hostility toward New Yorkers, people of a higher level of education than yours or people whose taste in entertainment varies from yours in any way. Those are all elitist attitudes as well, and are once again hugely hypocritical.”

No, that’s the thing, I don’t think I’m BETTER than any of those people, admitting differences and poking fun does not mean I feel better than anyone.

See, that you see that in what I wrote totally reveals your own elitism. Because none of what I said was meant in anything other than fun, hyperbolic jest.

I mean, c’mon, you’d think calling for a law against musicals would have clued you in…But some people, despite their fancy degrees and high brow tastes, they aren’t that bright.

How is anything you said simply “poking fun” or “admitting differences?” Either you’re revising history here or you simply don’t have a very good sense of humor. I suspect the former, but I concede the plausibility of the latter.

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