Robot 6

Thin wallets, fat bookshelves: A publishing news round-up

Two quick items of note:

1) Lissa “Kuriousity” Pattillo has sussed out what Vertical’s next big Osamu Tezuka translation project is, following their ongoing release of Black Jack. Apparently it’s Ayako, a work I’m unfamiliar with, but intially came out in 1972 and is described in detail over at the Anime News Network:

Ayako

Ayako

Jiro Tenge, the second son of what used to be an influential Japanese family, returns home after being a POW in an American camp during the Second World War. He finds his family corrupted by the terrible social aftereffects of the war. His elder brother, determined to keep what remains of the family patrimony after the Government’s forced land reallocation, has prostituted his wife to his father to secure his blessing, while other members of Jiro’s family have been drawn into similar corruption, and he himself is being forced to spy for the Americans after being broken as a POW. Now the family’s youngest daughter Ayako will have to bear the brunt of the family’s sins.

Judging by the page count, it looks like this will be a done-in-one volume similar to MW rather than separated into different volumes. According to Amazon, the book will be out in October. (via)

2) Paul Hornschemeier is currently working on a new collection of short stories entitled Forlorn Funnies Vol. 1. The book will come out in the fall from Fantagraphics. Here he is describing some of the contents:

Our principal concern of this volume, “Obvious Amenities,” is Act One of the story of Edward Molson, salesman. After the untimely osprey-induced death of a co-worker, Molson is thrust into a cross-country speaking engagement, a chance to revisit youthful diversions, and a potential extra-marital love affair. But for now, he has to walk his wife’s dog. Again.

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Comments

2 Comments

I’ve read Ayako in French translation (three small volumes in that case). It’s in the vein of MW, though the historical/political elements come a little more to the front, and the lead characters are slightly less morally reprehensible. Not nearly as over the top.

Same here, that’s a great Tezuka (and will teach you a bit about post-war Japan).

Do note that by page count that is indeed an omnibus edition.

Best,
Hunter (Pedro Bouça)

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