Robot 6

Comics A.M. | The comics Internet in two minutes

Disney & Marvel

Disney & Marvel

Business | Marvel CEO Isaac Perlmutter, who’s now worth about $1.6 billion thanks primarily to Disney’s purchase of the company, is among the 97 newcomers on Forbes magazine’s annual list of world billionaires. Perlmutter, who’s No. 616 out of 1,011 billionaires, netted nearly $900 million in cash from the deal and became Disney’s second-largest stockholder — behind fellow billionaire, and Apple co-founder, Steve Jobs (No. 136 on the list, with a worth of $5.5 billion). In September, the 67-year-old Perlmutter debuted at No. 230 on the magazine’s list of 400 richest Americans. [Money Control, The Hollywood Reporter]

Retailing | Barnes & Noble, the largest bookstore chain in the United States, reportedly has refused to carry the new graphic novel by Molly Crabapple and John Leavitt, labeling Scarlett Takes Manhattan as “too pornographic.” In a brief interview, Crabapple notes the book also has encountered problems with Diamond Comic Distributors, which initially listed Scarlett as “mature” before “plunking it into the much-worse-for-distribution ‘adult’ section.” [The Gloss]

Diamond Book Distributors

Diamond Book Distributors

Retailing | Using “cocktail napkin-style math,” Todd Allen estimates that the Amazon.com pricing glitch over the weekend that led to frenzied orders of deeply discounted deluxe-hardcover comics collections could end up costing Diamond Book Distributors somewhere between $100,000 and $400,000. (The glitch seems to have later affected Barnes & Noble, too, but on a much smaller scale.) Allen’s calculations involve a lot of guesswork — how many books were ordered, how many orders were filled, etc. — so there’s no telling just how wild his “wild guess” is, and I doubt Diamond will tell us whether he’s in the ballpark.

As of this morning, customers are still unable to buy Diamond-distributed books directly from Amazon. Prices at Barnes & Noble appear to have returned to normal, but many Marvel Omnibus editions remain out of stock. [Indignant Online]

Wizard Entertainment

Wizard Entertainment

Business | April Wiggins, marketing manager of Wizard Entertainment, has left the company after nine months. She’s been replaced by Jerry Milani, international editor of BaseballDigest.com and a veteran in sports-media relations. [Bleeding Cool]

Publishing | Tokyopop is looking for interns to join the marketing team for a three-month national tour. [Tokyopop, via About.com]

Creators | Cartoonist Guy Delisle discusses his travelogues and his current work, about living for a year in Jerusalem: “I’m just a normal guy wandering around. I collect information and mix it with my impressions.” [Global Times]

Creators | The alternative weekly in Salt Lake City, Utah, interviews Top Cow artist Tyler Kirkham. [City Weekly]

Creators | Mike Perridge chats with Kevin Colden, creator of Fishtown and I Rule the Night. [mpd57]

Manga | Katherine Dacey provides some pointers for reviewers who are unfamiliar with manga yet are assigned to write about it. Or, “If You’re Going to Hate on Manga …” [The Manga Critic]

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Comments

8 Comments

Matt Ampersand

March 12, 2010 at 8:21 am

“Perlmutter, who’s No. 616 out of 1,011 billionaires”

Alright, that’s a pretty damn funny coincidence.

I’m sure Ultimate Universe Ike will rank higher on next year’s list.

Yeah, that 616 coincidence is lovely synchronicity, isn’t it?

I’m sure Mr. Perlmutter enjoys living in that “reality”… I would!

The Amazon prices arent nearly as big a loss as people make out. Yes, omnis retail for $100. Does Amazon sell them at that price? No. When something is sold out, it goes back up to near retail value, but the standard pricing for an omnibus on Amazon is about $30-50, depending on just how high the RRSP was.

As Amazon.com is still sorting out the omnibii, Amazon.ca is a good metric to judge prices if you were interested. Canadian prices RRSP something like Brubaker’s Daredevil at $94 and Amazon.ca’s Day 1 price that is still up there right now is at $49.50. That’s a ~45% savings without any kind of discount and CAD prices on omnis are always a solid $10-15 more than the US prices,w hich would have put the standard US version on Amazon.com at about $35-40 US.

So, saying Amazon lost $85 selling the omnibus at $15 the other day is sensationalized to say the least and only padding numbers in an attempt to make it look worse. Non-omnibus, such as Nextwave Ultimate TPB were on Amazon.com for $19.99 US and dropped to $14.99 during the sale. That’s $5, but calculating it with the RRSP of ~$30-35 gives you a much larger “loss” on Amazon/Diamond’s part than it actually was. Similarly, the Ultimate trades that were on sale were all $19.99 on for $14.99.

Was there a large loss on the sale of many of these? Yes, but not to the extent that is being made out either, especially with the nullifying effect of limiting orders to one copy of each omnibus (many retailers ordered upwards of $10,000 worth of books that were basically killed on the spot) and the later selling out of product. Calling it 80-90% off retail price is correct, but it’s not 80-90% off Amazon prices, which is the biggest mistake these dollars and cents calculations are making. It’s an additional 10-25% off, which is a nice discount, but not somethign that will be more than a tiny blip on Amazon’s radar, though will still hurt Diamond if it’s their burden to bear.

Has it been proven that the Amazon and B&N glitches were Diamond’s fault? I know that the theory has been pushed around that DBD gave them bad data, but is that actually true or still just a theory?

If it does turn out to actually be Diamond’s fault, then I can just hear all the LCS owners yelling at the top of their lungs “TOLDJA!” to the book stores now having to deal with their shenanigans.

Don’t see how this cost Diamond anything. Amazon only sells books they have on hand. And Amazon isn’t selling on commission. They buy from Diamond, then sell to customers. Diamond is under no obligation to sell additional copies to Amazon at prices based on the error pricing.

The pricing glitch with Amazon is exactly why companies have Errors & Omissions insurance. Realistically the only cost to Amazon is slightly higher premiums, but nothing compared to the “estimated” $100,000 – $400,000.

Molly Crabapple is all sorts of hot.

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