Robot 6

Comics A.M. | The comics Internet in two minutes

Chapel Hill Comics

Chapel Hill Comics

Retailing | Ada Price surveys six retailers from across the United States about weathering the tough economy, what’s selling (and what’s not), and the effects of price increases and “event fatigue.” “Event titles brought people in last year, both long-time fans and new readers, but [this year] people are suffering from event fatigue,” said Eric Thornton of Chicago Comics. “The last year and a half [crossover] events didn’t bring people in, and catered to people who are [already] fans.” [PW Comics Week]

Publishing | Manga sales in Japan fell 6.6 percent to $4.63 billion in 2009, the largest annual decline in market history. The Tokyo-based Research Institute for Publications points to fans reading in manga cafes instead of buying in bookstores because of the recession, and the release of fewer hit titles. [Anime News Network]

Wandering Son, Vol. 1

Wandering Son, Vol. 1

Publishing | Matt Thorn, editor and curator of Fantagraphics Books’ recently announced manga line, reveals plans for four releases a year with print runs of 6,000 to 8,000 copies each. [PW Comics Week]

Legal | The vote by the Tokyo Metropolitan Assembly on the proposed legislation to restrict sexual provocative “visual images” of characters that appear or sound to be younger than 18 years old apparently will be postponed until June. The amendment, which would affect manga, anime and video games sold in metropolitan Tokyo, was protested earlier this week by manga creators. [Anime News Network]

Conventions | Reed Exhibitions Group Vice President Lance Fensterman discusses the debut Chicago Comics & Entertainment Expo, set for April 16-18. There’s also a brief preview of the Diamond Retailer Summit, which will be held April 14-16 in Chicago, in conjunction with C2E2. [ICv2.com]

American Vampire #1

American Vampire #1

Creators | The American Vampire promotional tour continues as writer Scott Snyder discusses working with Stephen King, and why he focuses on vampires, rather than, say, zombies or werewolves, for the new Vertigo series: “What’s so scary about vampires is that they are the same people — they just come back from the dead and they have this infection, this abomination of the blood that makes them into something that’s unnatural. For me they were always the scariest creatures for that reason. Scary zombies are sort of No. 2, where your father can come back and try and kill you. Vampires come back and are actually knowledgeable. It was the people around you turned into these monsters — the people you trusted like your neighbors in Salem’s Lot, or the people who live in the trashy trailer next door in Near Dark, or the kids you look up to in Lost Boys.  It’s that idea of someone you care about or somebody you trust coming back and being this evil version of themselves that Stephen King does so well.” [USA Weekend]

Madman Gargantua!

Madman Gargantua!

Creators | Brandon Burpee posts a video interview with Mike Allred from last weekend’s Emerald City ComiCon. [Multiversity Comics]

Creators | Stumptown Trade Review has audio interviews with Jeff Lemire and Terry Moore from Emerald City ComiCon. [Stumptown Trade Review]

Creators | Bob Fingerman discusses From the Ashes, the End of Days, his upbringing and more. [Heeb]

Creators | Brian Heater talks with artist Ryan Alexander-Tanner about his Xeric-winning book Television #1 and his collaboration with Bill Ayers on To Teach: The Journey, In Comics. [The Daily Cross Hatch]

Comics strips | Greg Evans’ syndicated strip Luann turns 25 years old today. [North County Times]

Comic strips | Olivia Putnal names seven comic strips, now in collected form, that deserve a second look. [Woman's Day]

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“Event titles brought people in last year, both long-time fans and new readers, but [this year] people are suffering from event fatigue,” said Eric Thornton of Chicago Comics. “The last year and a half [crossover] events didn’t bring people in, and catered to people who are [already] fans.”

To quote Didio event fatigue means people just don’t like you’re event, looking at how great BN is doing it’s clear that any event fatigue isn’t going on in DC because their event is doing great. On the other hand Marvel’s big event flopped and all of a sudden we see the even fatigue thing brought out and I don’t buy that for a second.

Thanks for the link to our Allred interview. Much appreciated!

@ EJ

Blackest Night is still not selling as well as Infinite Crisis or Final Crisis. Its selling well (just like Siege), but not as well as past events.

I know it may be hard to separate yourself from your party line (this idiotic loyalty toward companies fanboys tend to have), but look at it subjectively. Event comics in general are down.

“Marvel’s big event flopped ”

If having the #1 and #2 comics in consecutive months means something has flopped, the whole industry might as well fold. I guess it wouldn’t be comics commentary without hyperbole.

Thanks for the link to the piece at PW. That was a good read, and reflects a lot of what I hear from my lone remaining LCS (our other LCS in town closed for good in November).

“@ EJ

Blackest Night is still not selling as well as Infinite Crisis or Final Crisis. Its selling well (just like Siege), but not as well as past events.

I know it may be hard to separate yourself from your party line (this idiotic loyalty toward companies fanboys tend to have), but look at it subjectively. Event comics in general are down.”

No party lines here when I make a statement I back it up by facts, you’re right about Blackest Night not selling as well as Infinite Crisis but nothing for DC has this decade it’s their equivalent of Marvel’s Cival War.

But on the other hand Blackest Night has greatly outsold Final Crisis it’s not even close when you match up the numbers month to month but hey let’s just look at the numbers for comparion.

3/4 – FINAL CRISIS
05/2008: Final Crisis #1 of 7 — 166,641
06/2008: Final Crisis #2 of 7 — 134,114
08/2008: Final Crisis #3 of 7 — 123,881
10/2008: Final Crisis #4 of 7 — 115,666
12/2008: Final Crisis #5 of 7 — 109,181
01/2009: Final Crisis #6 of 7 — 123,345
01/2009: Final Crisis #7 of 7 — 103,292

1 – BLACKEST NIGHT
07/2009: Blackest Night #1 of 8 — 203,866
08/2009: Blackest Night #2 of 8 — 155,512
09/2009: Blackest Night #3 of 8 — 140,786
10/2009: Blackest Night #4 of 8 — 137,169
11/2009: Blackest Night #5 of 8 — 148,695
12/2009: Blackest Night #6 of 8 — 135,985
02/2009: Blackest Night #7 of 8 — 130, 613

As far as Siege goes that has done so poorly it hasn’t even been able to do Final Crisis numbers which were a disapointment as compared to what DC was expecting from that event. Add to the fact that Marvel event’s have routinelly outsold DC events by a good percentage (15% to 20%) it seems to me that it’s big seven year event in the making comic has been that companies biggest failure in maybe 15 years or more. Like the saying goes “men lie, women lie, but numbers don’t” no hyperbole needed when you actually study the numbers and know what they mean.

@ EJ dude
I thought the numbers would be higher considering Final Crisis was fairly self contained compared to Blackest Night.

“@ EJ dude
I thought the numbers would be higher considering Final Crisis was fairly self contained compared to Blackest Night.”

So did everyone else at DC, that’s why it was considered a disapointment DC thought it would give Secret Invasion a run for it’s money but in vastly underperformed against what was a very succesfull event by Marvel sales wise. But when you compared the Final Crisis numbers to Siege it blows that event out of the water, which is why it’s a flop Marvel has more fans and sells more comincs than DC by a nice margin when their big events put up such weak numbers all the spin in the world can’t change facts.

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