Robot 6

Bring out your dead: DC Comics cancels two more all-ages titles

Billy Batson and the Magic of Shazam #21

Billy Batson and the Magic of Shazam #21

Less than a week after the final issue of Super Friends hit shelves, DC Comics has announced the cancellation of two more titles in its all-ages imprint.

The publisher’s October solicitations, released yesterday afternoon, reveal that Billy Batson and the Magic of Shazam will end with Issue 21 and Batman: The Brave and the Bold with Issue 22. As Johanna Draper Carlson notes, that leaves Tiny Titans, which begins a three-issue crossover with Little Archie, as the lone remaining superhero title in the Johnny DC line. The other comics are based on Warner Bros. animated properties: Cartoon Network Action Pack, Scooby-Doo, Where Are You? and Looney Tunes.

The DC Comics section of KidsWB.com is a memorial to recently departed all-ages superhero books, with “free reads” of the first issues of Justice League Unlimited (2004-2008), Supergirl: Cosmic Adventures in the Eighth Grade (2009-2009), Super Friends (2008-2010) and, now, Billy Batson and the Magic of  Shazam (2008-2010) and Batman: The Brave and the Bold (2009-2010).

The demise of Batman: The Brave and the Bold seems odd, and perhaps only temporary, considering the apparent popularity of the Cartoon Network animated series and the planned release in September of the video game. Then again, Super Friends‘ connection to a Mattel toy line didn’t save that comic from the ax.

News From Our Partners

Comments

21 Comments

unbelieveable. Billy Batson and the Magic of Shazam is the best interpretation of Captain Marvel and co. in years!

Really too bad. Now when I take my kids to the comic shop their only super hero choices are the Marvel Adventures line. They loved Brave and the Bold and Super Friends.

Well there go any DC comics I buy for my daughter.

Remember folks, new comics readers just naturally occur and comics material for kids are an unnecessary vestige of the good ‘ol days.

I can hope that this was done as a preliminary step in launching a new all-ages imprint, or better yet, just putting out all-ages content without a banner on it that’ll drive “serious” comics readers away. I can hope that, but I’m not holding my breath.

I’m really disappointed with the Billy Batson and the Magic of Shazam cancellation. The big Red Cheese is my all time favourite superhero and this was the only way to get my fix of the character…. :(

Boooooooo… the publishers should be attempting to get new readers, not the other way around.

For profit companies tend not to cancel products that are making them money. That goes for products for kids too.

But, there will probably be other titles to replace the ones cancelled.

This is disappointing because I’ve seen kids in public places with some of the comics being canceled. Taking away the comics kids liked really could effect the future of the business.

Brian Winkeler

July 20, 2010 at 7:42 am

Super Friends, Billy Batson and Brave & The Bold are my seven-year-old’s three favorite comics. Now that those are gone, I can’t think of ANY mainstream DC titles that would be appropriate for him to read. Luckily we’ve still got Tiny Titans and the Marvel Adventures line (or whatever they’re calling it these days).

It’s a tough time to be a kid who wants to read new comics these days.

Wow. Boneheaded move. There is such a demand for these age-appropriate titles out there. I know, because I constantly have friends with kids asking me what comics to get for their kids, and Super Friends (along with Tiny Titans) is tops on the list.

My main problem with these titles, and the ones cancelled before them, is the mandate to follow a kidified style of art. This is doubly true in those titles that must replicate the art styles of their cartoon counterparts.

There has to be a middle ground between Disney comics and “grown up” superhero comics. Artists like Karl Kerschel, Ben Caldwell and more, if paired with “PG” scripts, could form a great gateway for the 7-10 crowd to get into comics.

Perhaps under the new DC leadership there’s an alternative plan for kids comics…? Maybe…? But, yeah, sad to see them go.

I hope Mike Norton has something lined up. His Shazam work is the best I’ve seen from him that isn’t “The Curse” or “The Answer”.

Awful news, both are great titles. B&B is especially terrific.

I just wonder if these books were being sold in the right places.
I wonder if they were being sold outside of the comic book shop.
I wonder if they should’ve placed comic book rack in the toy sections where the DC toys were being sold or in the DVD section where the DC cartoons were being sold.

Maybe a change a format would’ve helped these books survive.
Maybe release them as digest books instead of floppies.

I wonder if anyone in DC does a post-mortem on books like these or imprints like Minx.
Would be interesting to see that report.

“There has to be a middle ground between Disney comics and “grown up” superhero comics. Artists like Karl Kerschel, Ben Caldwell and more, if paired with “PG” scripts, could form a great gateway for the 7-10 crowd to get into comics.”

I’m sure there is, but why do we need to sacrifice Tiny Titans and Super Friends, which are G-rated comics, to get that? My son’s preschool friends were STARVED for superhero material that’s age appropriate.

Of course, who knows what DC’s future plans are, so maybe we’ll both get what we want.

My daughter’s going to be really annoyed when she finds out she won’t get any more Billy Batson. And it saddens me that I won’t be able to continue to instill the love of the character I have with her through a series that makes sense on every level.

But then they already did it to us once with the equally great Supergirl Cosmic Adventures in the 8th Grade.

Guys, don’t forget whenever DC cancels stuff in the kids line its usually because something new is coming up.

Odds are a Young Justice comic from Johnny DC is forthcoming. This doesn’t answer to me why these comics themselves are ending, but usually something does come along and replace them.

Brave and the Bold is definitely interesting unless we’re given any unfortunate announcements at SDCC regarding the cartoon.

My main problem with these titles, and the ones cancelled before them, is the mandate to follow a kidified style of art. This is doubly true in those titles that must replicate the art styles of their cartoon counterparts.

There has to be a middle ground between Disney comics and “grown up” superhero comics. Artists like Karl Kerschel, Ben Caldwell and more, if paired with “PG” scripts, could form a great gateway for the 7-10 crowd to get into comics.

________________________________________

I agree with everything you said.

Also, there used to be a “middle ground” between Disney comics and “grown up” superhero comics, they were the pre Quesada CCA approved Marvel superhero comics. Those pre Quesada CCA approved Marvel comics were (to quote John Byrne) “written in layers” so to appeal readers of all various ages on various levels. The only recent comics from the last several years that fall into this category that I can think of are THE FAMILY DYNAMIC,SPIDER-GIRL (and the other MC2 mini series),X-MEN FOREVER,X-FACTOR FOREVER,X-MEN FIRST CLASS,BIG HERO 6,CLAN DESTINE,FANTASTIC FOUR THE END,and the recently released THOR:THE MIGHTY AVENGER.

Are you KIDDING me? I just covered most of these titles on my site a week ago, and now they’re GONE?

My 6-year-old daughter is going to be crushed. DC Super Friends wasn’t as in-jokey as Tiny Titans and had really good pro-social messages. Maybe Super Friends was losing money for the company, but canceling it is short-sighted. Now, instead of continuing on with other DC titles as she grows older, we’ll be looking elsewhere for age-appropriate reads (Disney’s Princess and Tinker Bell Magazines, I guess) and staying away from DC, and our local comic stores.

It’s just sad. Way to go, DC.

Leave a Comment

 



Browse the Robot 6 Archives