Robot 6

Quote of the day | Robert Kirkman, on darker elements in superhero comics

Robert Kirkman (by Megan Mack/GQ)

Robert Kirkman (by Megan Mack/GQ)

“When I was reading comics when I was 15, Superman didn’t deal with rape so much, you know? There weren’t a lot of dark elements to mainstream superhero comics. I think that it’s pretty obvious that one of the things that’s hurting comics is that the subject matter is so inappropriate for a mass audience. You know, Marvel just did an intercompany crossover which was supposed to be something all of their readers can read, and it had guys ripping each other in half and intestines were flying all over the place. That’s the kind of thing that you would see in a Walking Dead comic. I don’t want to see Spider-Man swinging around, tripping in intestines going, ‘Aw, crap! What a mess!’ That’s not the kind of thing that’s going to get Billy down the street off of his Xbox. I think part of the problem is that the writers and artists that are doing these books want to write them for themselves, instead of for the audience they should be writing to. And I think that’s a real problem. […] I think it’s cool to see superheroes rip people in half. Because if superheroes really had superpowers, that’s the kind of shit that would happen, just on accident, you know? And so I created a book called Invincible that isn’t meant for a younger audience, and has superheroes ripping each other in half. But I didn’t try to take Superman and turn it into that book. I did my own book. I think that’s the key.”

– writer Robert Kirkman, on the gradual darkening of mainstream superhero comics

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48 Comments

I’m pretty sure intestines is EXACTLY what will get Billy down the street of his X-Box.

Also, off has two F’s. Billy probably can’t spell that well either.

You know what, he’s right.
But, he’s wrong too.

Meanwhile, Billy down the street is on his XBox360 blowing people away in Modern Warfare, or kicking that hooker one last time in Grand Theft Auto.

Kirkman’s full of himself, tooting his own horn, as usual. If it’s such an important think, why hasn’t he done something like he’s talking about?

Aside: Having a Superman story that deals with rape as subject matter isn’t the same as having Spider-man stumble over entrails or someone get ripped apart in Invincible. I don’t see the connection there.

Two Of My Earliest Comic Memories:
X-Men: God Loves, Man Kills opens with Purifiers killing two kids and stringing them up for other kids to see that they were dirty Muties.
Vigilante 17 and 18, Alan Moore’s two parter about Carl Linnaker, ex cop ex con who it is implied had sexual relations with his pre-pubescent daughter, and in the comic murders his ex-wife, a woman who had tried to help his daughter.

I was 10, 11 when I read these comics. They opened up an entirely new world to me. I saw things that resonated with me, not because they were comics or because they were dark, but because they were in their own savage way, real. I was a kid, but I wasn’t unaware of the world around me. Maybe I wasn’t a typical kid, but I never read ‘children’s fiction’ much, I can’t think of any young adult type stuff I ever read either, I went from Dr. Seuss to comics to Stephen King.

Anyway, I don’t disagree with the basic sentiment, but he’s taking random shots at Marvel and DC characters but he doesn’t offer up anything himself. So, y’know, put your money were your mouth is Kirkman. All I hear is a bunch of jabber and cheap shots.

When you try to get writers to write for a specific audience, that leads to all sorts of problems. Stan Lee has talked about this sort of thing a lot in interviews. Whenever he’s asked how he was able to write comics that were so resonant among young people, he says that he wasn’t writing for them — he was writing for himself, and he just hoped someone else would find it interesting. That was the whole Marvel ethos in those days, really; the writers and artists did what was pleasing to them, rather than pandering to convention and doing the same “kiddie” stuff the industry had been churning out for decades.

If a writer isn’t writing what appeals to him or her, then it shows and it’s not worth reading. If what appeals to certain writers today is intestines flying through the air…then so be it. It may not appeal to everyone, but it’s better than the alternative.

Intestines flying around isn’t what keeps Siege from being accessible to the mainstream, non-comic reading public, which is who I’m assuming that’s who he thinks they should be writing for.

This would be more believable coming from him, except that he’s doing the same type of violent thing in Invincible, his superhero comic.

Oops, skipped the last line of his quote. Nevermind.

One more reason why Kirkman should be the last-word creative gatekeeper at one of the Big Two (preferably DC).

Also, exactly what “intercompany” crossover is he talking about? That word means that it’s a crossover between two companies (Marvel and DC, Marvel and Image, etc.). If he’s talking about Siege or Ultimatum or something, he should have used the word “intracompany.”

If you’re going to do a monthly comic book, it has to be a serial. It doesn’t work any other way. And if you’re going to do a super hero universe, you’re going to have people who feel out of the loop. If you’re too much of a wimp to jump into a story because it’s not the Very Beginning, or Easily Digestible, I don’t know if you want to read anything. You sound kinda dumb. It never bothered me to start reading a comic on issue 480, or even part 2 of 3, if it looked good I tried it.

Now, if you wanted to refocus on self contained novel type stories, I’d be all for it, 4 Superman GNs a year, 6 Batman, etc, you stagger publishing schedules, you produce high quality worth stockpiling books, you could save this industry from it’s advertising reliant junk culture status. But they still think they can push pamphlets and do trades.

Cut out the middle man, especially when the middle man wastes time and paper.

Sorry, man, I just don’t see the point in wasting all that time on monthlies, I’d love to a see a comic world rid of the format altogether.

Does it matter that he did “Invincible” in his own book? It still has all of the “problems” he talked about (I don’t think they are problems per se, but let’s just go with the logic).

And I actually LIKE Invincible, but calling other people’s work out for something that you do yourself is not very professional is it?

I’m glad other people said what I wanted to before me, so now I can just agree without putting in that much effort. ^_^

I agree with what Kirkman says. Here’s the thing. A lot of you are probably looking at this as an 18+ year old reader. I look at comics now primarily as a parent with kids ages 5-16 who love super heroes and comics. Stan Lee wrote stories for himself, yes, but he still wrote stories that could be enjoyed be anyone, whether they were 5 or 105. The same cannot be said for the writers of the mainstream characters today. There was a time if your kid wanted a book with Spider-Man or Superman in it, you didn’t need to preview it first. It’s too bad I have to limit my children’s super hero comic options to the Marvel Adventures and DC Kids lines. At least Brian Clevinger and Scott Wegener get it right with Atomic Robo.

The problem with the big company crossovers is not that they have intestines, its that they require you to read books across several titles and aren’t decipherable to anybody trying to jump-on as a new fan. All Kirkman’s arguments are specious at best, and while I don’t like gritty/dark for the sake of gritty/dark (Infinite Crisis, ug), I do feel like a writer should chase down what excites him about whatever character(s) he’s writing, and find what is provocative to him so that he can actually have stake in the story, I think writing just for an audience specifically is sort of the worst advice you can give a creative person.

Kirkman is a bad writer with some neat ideas in his comics, and for the most part he’s just way off base here.

5-16 is a pretty broad range, there. And 16 year olds can read any comic put out by Marvel or DC, if they can’t handle that stuff at 16, they’re at the very least mildly retarded. Sorry, there’s nothing in those comics a 13 year old hasn’t seen in a movie or a video game.

Wost of all is the flat out lie he propagates that there aren’t Spider-Man or Superman comics for kids.

There are comics for kids. Period. He’s acting like NO ONE puts out comics for kids. It’s a specious argument. Marvel and DC BOTH put out comics for kids. My nephew reads those digest size Marvel Adventures books.

And again, if it’s so all fired important, why hasn’t Kirkman done it? He’s just out there taking cheap shots. When HE KNOWS Marvel has their Adventures line and DC has their Johnny DC line.

He’s reaching Erik Larsen territory.

You’re right, the 16 year can read whatever. But why can’t his little brothers enjoy the same titles? I realize I’m in the minority here, and you’re right, Kirkman does neglect the fact that both of the big two have All-Ages titles. I just long for the time when every title was an All-Ages title. I know that puts me in the “old-fogey, get over it and move on” category. Honestly, though, how many of us would be reading comics today if we hadn’t started reading them when they were All-Ages books? How many people will be reading comics in 20 years if they can’t start reading them now because the All-Ages titles are so few and confined to the dark, dusty corner of the comic shop?

@MadMikeyD: You’re right in that superhero comics during Stan Lee’s time were generally suitable for all ages. But there are plenty of comic books today that are the same way, and for those that aren’t, that’s why ratings exist. If parents don’t pay attention to them when they buy comics for their kids, whose fault is that? It’s the exact same argument you can have about movies and video games: no one is forcing you to buy your 10 year-old the newest Grand Theft Auto game, so whatever happens when you do is your own fault.

On a different note, I take issue with Kirkman’s idea that high levels of sex and violence are anything new in comics. One of the first Spider-Man comics I read had Peter Parker beating his wife, for crying out loud! If anything, I think the major companies are showing a lot better judgment in the way they market and label these things than they have in the past.

Tearing intestines mean Billy’s parents won’t give Billy the money to buy the comic books. Also, I’m not sure Billy knows that someone got their intestines torn out. And finally, if intestines torn out is all that is offered, then Billy can just look at the panel online.

@Marc – I can agree with you on those points. That’s the purpose of the ratings system and I do use them, for comics, movies, games, TV shows, etc. I also agree there has always been a level of sex and violence in comics. These days it just get shown a lot more explicitly and grapically than it used to. Same thing in movies and TV. Maybe I have become just an old fogey. Maybe I am remembering things better than they really were. At any rate, I still believe Kirkman has some good points, and at least I know the whole family can enjoy Marvel Adventures, DC Kids and Atomic Robo.

While Kirkman may not take his own advice in his own books, I do know that he wrote at least one All-Ages story at Marvel than my kids and I enjoyed. It was the third Marvel Military Special, with the New Avengers and the X-Men. Yeah, that was the idea of the project, but still, it shows he is capable of doing All-Ages super hero material.

I forget was it Kirkman who had a character he created for Marvel Team-Up first be crippled then brutally beaten to death? And wasn’t one of Kirkman’s major books for Marvel Marvel Zombies, which I am sure involved someone tripping on some type of human remains? And didn’t he turn Ultimate Nightcrawler into a stalker that gave the impression he may have wanted to rape Ultimate Dazzler?

Everything Kirkman says is shaded by his creator manifesto. Everything not creator-owned is excessive or over-the-top. He is definitely Larsen-esque.

“One of the first Spider-Man comics I read had Peter Parker beating his wife, for crying out loud!” \

I’d like to see an issue number for that, if you don’t mind. I’m pretty sure the only place Peter Parker ever beat his wife was in Spiderman 3. This is an outrage!!!

When Pixar is capable of doing a Fantastic Four story (well without the F4 that is) that can appeal to all can’t the big two as well? Why do we need grim and gritty with porn traced artwork? We don’t, a good story by a talented writer is something that can be told without adult themes, there is no reason the entire line of superhero titles for kids needs to be handled with Johnny DC and Marvel Adventures. If anyone had the creativity or ingenuity it could be done company wide. You could still put out mature reader titles and titles with a bit more heft in terms of themes, but like him or not Kirkman makes a valid point.

Robert is absolutely right. I think, unfortunately, most adult fans confuse “all ages” with “kiddie.” “Lunch Box” properties like Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, Teen Titans, should be all ages monthly books. Violence isn’t the only issue that pushing this stuff out of the realm of all-ages, into decidedly adult territory. It’s the overall feel. Superhero books have mass appeal because of the awe, wonder and adventure elements that made them popular for 50 +years. Those elements are lost on older, jaded readers, who now only respond to SHOCK, and the only way to shock people is by relying on gore, violence and sexual depravity. There’s definitely a place for that sort of thing (lord knows I do it all the time in my Hack/Slash comic), but it shouldn’t be in mass appeal properties that have been aimed at all-ages readerships for half a century. ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, the current crop of Spider-Man titles…great examples of modern all-ages superhero stuff.
TIM

Doesn’t he write a Zombie book?

And isn’t this the same guy that wrote Nightcrawler turning into an obsessive psycho in Ultimate X-men?

Yeah, he’s not hypocritical at all.

When you try to get writers to write for a specific audience, that leads to all sorts of problems. Stan Lee has talked about this sort of thing a lot in interviews. Whenever he’s asked how he was able to write comics that were so resonant among young people, he says that he wasn’t writing for them — he was writing for himself, and he just hoped someone else would find it interesting. That was the whole Marvel ethos in those days, really; the writers and artists did what was pleasing to them, rather than pandering to convention and doing the same “kiddie” stuff the industry had been churning out for decades.

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True, However, what you and others don’t seem to realize or comprehend (or even want to admit) is that Stan wrote LAYERED all ages comics. Heck, up until Quesada became EIC, MOST of the interconnected MU superhero titles were written in a layered all ages manner. Those pre Quesada Marvel books were not “kiddy” books but were true all ages comics. Now the Marvel Adventure comics, those are “kiddy” books.

Robert is absolutely right. I think, unfortunately, most adult fans confuse “all ages” with “kiddie.” “Lunch Box” properties like Spider-Man, Batman, Superman, Teen Titans, should be all ages monthly books. Violence isn’t the only issue that pushing this stuff out of the realm of all-ages, into decidedly adult territory. It’s the overall feel. Superhero books have mass appeal because of the awe, wonder and adventure elements that made them popular for 50 +years. Those elements are lost on older, jaded readers, who now only respond to SHOCK, and the only way to shock people is by relying on gore, violence and sexual depravity. There’s definitely a place for that sort of thing (lord knows I do it all the time in my Hack/Slash comic), but it shouldn’t be in mass appeal properties that have been aimed at all-ages readerships for half a century. ALL-STAR SUPERMAN, the current crop of Spider-Man titles…great examples of modern all-ages superhero stuff.
TIM
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I agree with pretty much everything you said. However, I disagree with you about the current crop of Spider-Man comics being great examples of modern all ages superhero comics. Those Spidey books, despite the A rating are not suitable for all ages. However, A rated Marvel comics like X-MEN FOREVER,NEW MUTANTS FOREVER,SPECTACULAR SPIDER-GIRL,X-MEN FIRST CLASS,THOR:THE MIGHTY AVENGER,and the last BIG HERO 6 mini series are all examples of what I would call LAYERED all ages comics.

My favorite thing about it, is that this article is sitting on top of one for a “‘Hardcore violent’ Suicide Squad video game.” I hope Billy buys it.

You know, I’m calling BS on this. Read Batman comics from around 1985 — before Watchmen or Dark Knight supposedly darkened mainstream comics. Consider, for example, the cover to Batman #399:

http://www.coverbrowser.com/image/batman/399-2.jpg

(also note the telling corner box message)

And yeah, kids hate gory comics. That’s why EC was never a commercial success, right?

“I’d like to see an issue number for that, if you don’t mind. I’m pretty sure the only place Peter Parker ever beat his wife was in Spiderman 3. This is an outrage!!!”

Well, he sort of threw her. During the Clone Saga. Might have been while she was pregnant, in fact, but I don’t remember for sure.

And anyway, Hank Pym beat his wife years earlier.

I can’t comment on how other people were raised or raise their own kids, but I read old Image titles when I was about 10 like Shadowhawk or Savage Dragon when they were brand new and I see little in most current Marvel Comics that even come close to the level of violence or sexuality that I saw when I was reading those early Image titles. Yeah, occasionally the Sentry rips people in half, but for the most part there’s WAY too much exaggeration in how gruesome modern Marvel comics have become (can’t comment on DC, I only read Morrison’s Batman and Vertigo[or a few Krul or Robinson books that hear are particularly awful]). Out of the HUNDREDS of books Marvel has published since Sentry ripped Ares in half, how many horribly violent instances have their been? How many made you think “Oh that’s so much worse than Kraven’s muder-suicide attempt back in the 80s!”?
Go read the online comic Axe Cop. It’s written by a 5 year old and there’s more death, destruction, and decapitation per page than just about anything Marvel puts out. And if their isn’t any actual death in the page then most likely there is the threat of Axe Cop cutting someone’s head off at least.
Or check out http://kidscomicbooks.blogspot.com/ in which a 9 year old reviews (kids talk, father writes) comics like Amazing Spider-Man or Blackest Night and just about every comic they review gets at least an 8 out of 10.

And he decided to write Marvel Zombies because…..?

I agree with pretty much everything you said. However, I disagree with you about the current crop of Spider-Man comics being great examples of modern all ages superhero comics. Those Spidey books, despite the A rating are not suitable for all ages. However, A rated Marvel comics like X-MEN FOREVER,NEW MUTANTS FOREVER,SPECTACULAR SPIDER-GIRL,X-MEN FIRST CLASS,THOR:THE MIGHTY AVENGER,and the last BIG HERO 6 mini series are all examples of what I would call LAYERED all ages comics.

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Crap, I used my newsarama and The Beat user name “Wraith” instead of my CBR user name Blade X in my last few posts. If it’s not too much trouble, could the mods edited my user name from my last several posts in the comment sections on this blog from “Wraith” to “Blade X”. I believe that their is another Wraith who posts on these threads and I don’t want to get confused with him or vis versa.

I don’t agree with Kirkman usually, but I think he’s right on the money here. What he’s talking about is independent, privately-owned characters, like he’s doing at Image, versus the major tentpole franchises of Marvel and DC that were written to appeal to a large age range from their creations through the mid-90s.

I don’t think he’s talking about the implied violence that has been the backbone of super-hero comics and adventure fiction since the beginning, but the graphic depiction of violence and gore that’s become the norm over the past ten years. Take Rise and Fall of Arsenal. There’s a huge difference between seeing the graphic brutality of somebody having his arm ripped off and the implied violence of the same act just in silhouette. I’ve been reading a lot of Essentials and Showcases, and I was amazed at the LACK of violence. A lot of the stuff we’d physically see on the page today instead either happened off-panel, in silhouette, or mostly implied. Today, when Jonah Hex shoots somebody, we may see the bullet rip through the person and burst through the other side leaving a trail of blood (and don’t get me wrong–I love Palmiotti & Gray’s Jonah Hex). But in the 70s, we wouldn’t see a bullet or even a bullet hole normally, much less spurts of blood.

What Kirkman’s talking about here, I think, is the intentional injection of adult images and themes onto franchises that the writer grew up with. And when I say “adult,” I’m not talking just about porn or graphic violence, but stories that are structured and have themes which are specifically written for an older audience and simply wouldn’t appeal to a younger one.

I think it was Steven Grant here at CBR who said that modern super-hero stories are essentially bad fan fiction. I just read today at CSBG that Geoff Johns was petitioning for Lex Luthor to be Superboy’s co-father for years before Johns worked for DC. In this case, it was a great idea, but I think most writers grew up with these characters, and they are just writing the basically the same stories they made up when they were 13.

And most 13 year olds can’t write.

I know this marks me as a colossal stick in the mud, but I believe that if you accept the honor of writing something like Superman or the Fantastic Four, you have a responsibility to the character, the company, and the fans to write for as wide an audience as possible.

I wholeheartedly agree with Wraith with his choices of great all-ages reads.

Personally, I blame the editors. Sure the writers are the ones creating the stories. But the editors are the ones who are actually the guardians of these characters’ legacies. But between bowing to superstar writers whims, trying to make headlines for the ever-dwindling fan community, and corporate mandates for massive crossovers, the editors are just allowing the writers to take any direction they want with a property, hoping it will work.

Intestines? Was Kirkman referring to Sentry cutting Ares in half with his bare hands in Siege?

The sad truth is that most comics today are written ” by ” middle-aged immature assholes, ” for ” middle-aged immature assholes, and it’s been that way for a long time now.

Now, go ahead and tell me I’m wrong, and tell me about all the kiddie books available. But then ask yourself, “What is the percentage of all ages material available?” Pretty small I’d bet. How accessible is it? Nothing is being done to grow this stagnating hobby, and every year the sales shrink a little more.

Most of you don’t give a shit. You want Green Lantern and Spider-man and the rest, all to yourselves. And the only way you can still dig it at your advanced age, is if it is filled with brutal violence and sex, and swearing and drug use. You love superhero comics so much, that like a jealous lover, you’d rather see them dead, than in the hands of another generation. Well, you’re gonna get your wish.

What does it matter how many comics are out there for kids if they DO NOT BUY THE ONES THAT EXIST. What the HELL do you want publishers to do throw good money after bad trying to sell monthly comics to kids who DO NOT want to go to a comic shop once a week and get their fix.

The monthly comic format is built for nerds. It’s not built for kids as they exist now. My nephew wouldn’t know what a comic book look liked, He reads the Marvel Adventures Digests. He loves them. He loves Hulk, Spider-Man, the Avengers.

But he would probably think a comic book for $4 is a rip off when he can spend $9 and get 4-5 times as much material (Story and art) without intrusive advertising.

And again, Kirkman had Marvel wrapped around his finger, he was able to get The Destroyer published, almost no one besides him remembered or cared about the Destroyer.

You can’t tell me this guy couldn’t have gotten a book like he talks about published at Marvel or DC. He just didn’t want to. He’s as much the problem as anyone else. He had the chance and he never even considered it (too busy making that nerd pleasing money), anyway, the point here is simple: Comic book magazines are an expensive and stupid format, and Kirkman is full of crap.

You sell to the audience that buys. You can’t force kids to buy $4 32 page pamphlets when they get $10 120+ pages of story with no advertising in a nice sturdy little pocket sized book.

I think what Kirkman is ignoring here is it’s not just about whether there’s gore or the like. It’s how appropriate that subject matter is to the material at hand. For example, his own book, Invincible, which I used to really love, has become pretty much a serious gorefest of late. I enjoyed Invincible because it could do that, but didn’t do it excessively. But I think Kirkman has fallen victim to the fallacy of “I should because I can” with the gore. And I don’t think it’s inappropriate because it scares off kids. Kids are as diverse, or moreso, than adults. It’s inappropriate because the gore detracts from the quality of the book. There’s less story and more splatter with every passing issue, and it seems like every cover now is someone with broken bones and a pulped face. Graphic violence is good in some cases because it provokes shock and horror. If overdone, it becomes empty blood porn.

Crap, I used my newsarama and The Beat user name “Wraith” instead of my CBR user name Blade X in my last few posts. If it’s not too much trouble, could the mods edited my user name from my last several posts in the comment sections on this blog from “Wraith” to “Blade X”. I believe that their is another Wraith who posts on these threads and I don’t want to get confused with him or vis versa.

COMEEEEEEEDYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY

I, for one, thought it was an excellent interview.

All comics writers these days need to be forced to sit down and watch every episode of the new DOCTOR WHO so they can see how “all-ages” entertainment can work. Moffat’s episodes especially.

Ron from up North

August 8, 2010 at 2:41 pm

I agree with Mr. Kirkman. I grew up reading DC and Marvel. My kids won’t.

First, if you need to read up in continuity or feel the need to bone up on continuity before you can understand a single issue of the comic book the two possibilities are that you are insane as an OCD case or the comic book is written poorly.

A well-written comic book is one that you can pick up for the exciting cover concept and no matter how much back story could be read to enhance the enjoyment, at minimum the only thing you need to know ahead of time is how to read. When I started reading comics I was four or five. I’m 28. My first comic books were published in the seventies and the forties. They had as much continuity as “who the hell is the Green Lantern in a cape?” or the 15 years that came before the Spider-Man comic I was reading at the time.

Be it 15 years or 40 years, if you think you need to read more comics before you can read the comic you are holding, then there is a problem with the comic you are reading or you are literally crazy.

Second, pamphlet comics are too expensive to waste on children these days unless you have a nickel-or-dime-or-quarter-used-comic-book source. Children won’t spend that kind of money. I won’t waste it on a kid with kid’s hands. They’re not delicate instruments and if you spend that kind of money on this scrap paper it elevates the scrap paper in “keep-it” value.

Third, lunch box heroes should never be the forum in which certain topics are explored…. except for Batman and I think Batman is one of the few characters that can do dark violent and all-ages.

I think Kiddy Batman comics are stupid and unreadable and if Brave and the Bold were a kiddy show I’d be annoyed. It’s not a kiddy show and has something for me…. the guy who has been reading 45 years of Batman in the scope of 25.

Fourth Anyone who calls Kirkman a hypocrite for the misuse of lunch box heroes in rape-n-gore stories while Kirkman uses his obscure non-lunchbox heroes characters for horror and hyper-violence never read the last paragraph where he mentions the freedom of not using characters that children love. And those people should have failed high school given this huge flaw in reading comprehension.

Fifth…. lunch box heroes…. these are children’s characters even if the comics are all-ages because they are what they are. If you don’t think it’s possible for Darkwing Duck and Mickey Mouse to start committing acts of genocide in an official Disney comic…. then you simply have to wait for Disney legal standards and practices to stop caring. Anything is possible with any character as long as enough people want to do it or do not care. People should take more care.

“Kirkman is a bad writer with some neat ideas in his comics, and for the most part he’s just way off base here.”

I Feel the exact opposite, i think hes a pretty good writer as far as reaching the reader but everything hes done in invincible has been pretty much “Ultimate everything already done” . It seems like his versions of already popular characters for the most part, shit he even lifted Starro.
That being said im totally into invincible, but yeah he talks about how he feels about these things and kinda forgets thats these are merely his opinions. Spiderman tripping through intestines wont get a 14 year old off his xbox? theres no way he can be that out of touch, does he know any 14 year olds?

Wait didn’t he right Marvel Zombies and Marvel Zombies 2 that had ultra violence on every page? He’s guilty of his own complaint.

DrunkJack said: “I was 10, 11 when I read these comics.”

Then DrunkJack grew up to be “DrunkJack.”

Am I wrong to question the impact reading such things at that formative age may have on a person’s world-view? We’re an awfully jaded generation here, after all.

That said, the best reason for following Kirkman’s advice is that it might get mainstream comics back into venues where considerably more ten year old kids actually have access to them. Repairing parents’ perception of the medium at this point might not be so easy, though…

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