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Nexus, by Steve Rude

Creators | Renowned artist Steve Rude and his family are in danger of losing their home, so the co-creator of Nexus is auctioning art in hopes of raising the money to meet a Nov. 15 deadline. [Steve Rude's Facebook, The Comics Reporter]

Publishing | Retailer news and analysis site ICv2.com suggests Bryan Lee O’Malley’s Scott Pilgrim series could close out 2010 as the No. 1 graphic-novel property of the year, surpassing the top-selling adaptation of Stephen Meyer’s Twilight. [ICv2.com]

Digital comics | David Brothers wonders how the rise of digital comics might change comics “culture,” and the Wednesday ritual. [4thletter!]

Comic Book Guy

Retailing | Some 20 years after the character’s debut, the Boston Herald asks retailers what they think of The Simpsons‘ Comic Book Guy. “I love the fact that my occupation gets the Simpsons treatment, an over-the-top stereotype,” says Larry Doherty, owner of Larry’s Wonderful World of Comics in Lowell, Mass. “If your occupation doesn’t get the Simpsons treatment, maybe it’s irrelevant.” [Boston Herald]

Creators | Tucker Stone talks with Darwyn Cooke at length about his adaptation of The Outfit. [Comics Alliance]

Creators | Douglas Wolk chats briefly with artist Doug Mahnke. [Techland]

Creators | Dartmouth’s student newspaper covers a lecture by Fun Home cartoonist Alison Bechdel. [The Dartmouth]

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Comments

14 Comments

Horrible news about Rude. The guy is such an incredibly talented artist, it’s hard to believe that he’s in such dire straits. Surely there’s work to be found for him? A Nexus/Silver Surfer team-up (vs. Thanos) would be awesome to behold.

Ugh, yeah, that’s awful about Rude. It’s not right.

If an artist like Steve Rude can’t be well off from comics work there’s no way in hell i’m gonna let my son pursue a career in that field sheesh.

I would think that Steve Rude would be able to make quite a bit of money illustrating covers for any comic book company out there. I know he is not the fastest artist in the world, but covers would seem right up his alley. Why are Marvel, DC, Dark Horse, Image, etc. etc. not knocking down his door?

Maybe there’s something else going on behind the scenes, but the fact that an industry legend like Rude is about to lose his house is an injustice (though, sadly, it is not unique for comic industry veterans to have money trouble).

He also needs to partner with a company that can handle the business side of things so he can focus solely on the creative.

^^^ I know “the man” is always an evil, devil monster out to get everybody, but why do the two commenters above me assume “the industry” is to blame for Rude’s current state of arrears? I read the Spurgeon article and found nothing to suggest that. Not saying this is necessarily the case with Rude, but you know, there are people who are bad with money.

I don’t know his sitch, but I’ve been a nexus fan forever, though grew very disillusioned with the Dude over time. What is the last comic project he finished in under 2 years time? I don’t recall ever seeing his last start on Nexus completed, or X-Men Children of the Atom, a six issue series which he dropped out of after issue 3.

Covers would seem to be a great way for him to go. His covers were always ridiculously cool in my book.

Dlope

Tragic news.

I think this trailer for a documentary on Steve Rude makes it pretty clear why he’s not doing well financially.

http://www.comicsalliance.com/2010/09/13/rude-dude-documentary-steve-rude/

Don’t forget that Rude suffers from major depression which can make it hard to work which is why his last Nexus project took so long.

hope Rude gets back on his feet soon!

Why Rude isn’t doing covers or licensing art for DC or Marvel is beyond me.
Besides his own dynamic style, he’s able to match other artist’s styles spectacularly.
(The box art he did for the last batch of 1960s Marvel Super-Heroes videos from Fox were dead-on to Kirby, Ditko and Heck!)
But apparently using artists over 50 (except for George Perez and Keith GIffen) is a no-no at the big companies.
Just ask Herb Trimpe or Gene Colan.

I feel really bad for Rude. Such a great, great artist. I kind of wish that dire financial straits would motivate him to do interior work in a timely manner*, however, instead of selling off his art. I could afford to buy a new series he might do, but original art is out of my price range.

*This may sound cruel, but I remember reading an interview with Simonson where he said that he works slowly now because he’s in a comfortable financial situation, whereas he was able to do monthly books in the past because he needed money to keep afloat. If Rude went this route, his home could be saved, and we could be blessed with new Rude pencils!

@Peter:

It doesn’t sound cruel. However, it does sound wildly ill-informed.

I’ve read several interviews with Rude over the years and it’s very clear that his slow pace is not a matter of choice or sloth. He’s a perfectionist who requires a significant amount of time, thought, preparation, and execution to complete his work. That’s simply who he is. If “working faster” was as simple and easy a solution as you so breezily suggest, don’t you think he would have figured that out years ago and avoided his current situation?

Think before you type.

I know that Rude suffers from RLS and depression, as well as perfectionism. I am also aware that his current situation is due largely to the failure of his publishing company, and certainly not laziness. But I’m sure we’ve all felt more motivated to do work when it’s crunch time, so to speak. I’m sorry for my poorly worded and inconsiderate comment.

I met The Dude at SDCC in 2006 and was thrilled. I tried to get a commissioned piece from him but he said he was backlogged on work and could not squeeze anything else in.

His work is incredible. I would buy anything and everything he puts out, esp Nexus.

Good luck Steve.

Maybe cranking out some autographed prints ? That would seem to be fairly easy with previous artwork or even a benefit art book or portfolio.

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