Robot 6

Comics A.M. | No new bidders for Borders; CCI sets 2012 prices

Borders

Retailing | A Sunday deadline passed without additional bidders for the bankrupt Borders Group, leaving a group of liquidators as the only suitor for the second-largest bookstore chain in the United States. However, The Wall Street Journal reports that the bookseller will likely entertain offers right up until Tuesday’s scheduled bankruptcy auction. The newspaper contends Borders was in negotiations late Sunday with Books-A-Million in hopes of striking a deal that  would save what remains of the company, which once operated more than 1,000 locations. [The Wall Street Journal]

Conventions | Comic-Con International has released information on prices for the 2012 San Diego Comic-Con. Adult four-day passes will no longer be discounted compared to the prices of single-day badges; an adult four-day pass without the option to attend Preview Night will cost $150, while buying individual adult tickets for each day would cost $143. Adult four-day tickets with Preview Night will cost $175. Per the CCI website, “We hope that this change will encourage people to purchase only the days they will actually be attending, leaving additional badges for others who want to attend Comic-Con.”

Attendees at this week’s San Diego-Comic-Con can purchase 2012 tickets at the Douglas Pavilion at the Manchester Grand Hyatt; a 2011 badge will be required to purchase them. [The Beat, CCI]

Conventions | Upcoming Action Comics writer Grant Morrison shares thoughts on the San Diego Comic-Con, “a place where the boundary between fantasy and reality happily surrenders to the carnival spirit and anything can happen.” [Hero Complex]

Shel Dorf Awards

Awards | The second Shel Dorf Awards, which will be presented at Detroit Fanfare in September, have opened up voting to fans and expanded the number of categories. [Comics Worth Reading]

Creators | Megatokyo creator Fred Gallagher sits down in front of the camera for a video interview at Anime Expo, where he was one of the guests of honor. [Anime Diet]

Creators | Lynn Johnston talks about For Better or For Worse in a video of her presentation at the Charles Schulz Museum earlier this year. [The Daily Cartoonist]

Digital | Eric Burns explains, in detail, why DC is doing it wrong with their digital strategy, including the new 52. (tl;dr: As a series gets older, trades, discounts, and ultimately the secondhand market make it possible to read the story in print at a fraction of the price of the single issues in digital form. The obvious solution: Bundle them and discount them.) [Websnark]

Webcomics | Shaenon Garrity presents a short history of webcomics, from FetusX to Girls with Slingshots. [The Comics Journal]

Review | Paul Karasik reviews Joyce Farmer’s Special Exits. [The Comics Journal]

Teen Titans, by Bill Walko

Webcomics | Following a piece by ComicsAlliance on why Marvel and DC should be making superhero webcomics, Lauren Davis asks several webcomics creators what they would pitch to the two mainstream companies if given the chance. [Gamma Squad]

Newspaper comics | Creators Jim Scancarelli (Gasoline Alley), Marcus Hamilton (Dennis the Menace), Alex Saviuk (Spider-Man) and Joe Staton (Dick Tracy) discuss the challenges of taking over a legacy newspaper strip in this audio recording from a panel at HeroesCon. [The Daily Cartoonist]

History | Ken Quattro reads the FBI files on the investigation of publisher Lev Gleason (Daredevil, Crime Does Not Pay) as a suspected Communist. There’s more background in this story from The Comics Journal that ran last year. [The Comics Detective]

Movies | Sean Kleefeld recounts his experience on a casting call for extras for the upcoming Avengers movie. [Kleefeld on Comics]

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Comments

2 Comments

boarders might as well face it their time is drawing to a close unless a miracle buyer happens in the next few days. and amazed to see that given how dc and marvel want to use the internet to increase their fan base they never looked into web comics of their characters.

Besides the impact of e-book readers, maybe they shouldn’t let people flop for hours on end reading books in the store and drinking an expresso. Buy and leave! They allowed people to treat them like the free public library, which is one reason why they went under and nobody wants to buy their culture of not making money.

This is the only retail store I’ve been to where they let people open the product and use the product, while sitting on the floor in the aisles where other people are trying to shop, all without paying a dime.

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