Robot 6

Comics A.M.| Retailers on print vs. digital; Yang on comics, Christianity

Justice League #1

Retailing | Sacramento, Calif.-area retailers are relatively unconcerned about DC Comics’ newly launched digital initiative or an immediate threat to their bottom lines from digital comics. “I just see it as another way of kind of expanding the whole readership,” says Dave Downey, who runs World’s Best Comics. “If you missed an issue of Spider-Man, and you can’t find it anywhere, you can always go online and read it that way.” However, Kenny Russell of Big Brother Comics sees a time, “years off,” when that will all change: “It’s inevitable, and this is kind of the first step. In no time, iPads are going to be good enough, and it’s going to be easy enough, and it’s going to come out the same day where people are going to just read their comics on their iPads.” [Sacramento News & Review]

Comics | Gene Luen Yang explores the tangled history of comics and Christianity, both of which, he points out, were started by a bunch of Jewish guys who loved a good story. (Good-sized excerpt at the link; full article requires free registration.) [Sojourners]

Comics | Johanna Draper Carlson is unimpressed by DC’s New 52 relaunch, and she’s not afraid to say why: “Maybe because I remember buying the first and best of these ‘it’s all different now’ events, Crisis on Infinite Earths, off the spinner rack at the newsstand. Maybe because the death and destruction of Flashpoint made me cringe. But really, I suspect it’s because it’s the same old guys in charge now as were before, and they really don’t seem to get it.” She also has been reading a lot of other people’s work, so her essay doubles as a good link roundup of what folks have been saying lately. [Comics Worth Reading]

Habibi

Creators | Craig Thompson discusses the creation and themes of his new graphic novel Habibi: “It was born out of 9/11 in the sense that Islam was being vilified in the media, and I wanted to humanise it a bit and understand it, and focus on the beauty of Arabic and Islamic culture. My experience of speaking to Muslims was that they weren’t any different to the Christian communities I grew up in — they had the same morals and the same lifestyles, and the same stories that shaped their religions. Then also I got really inspired by the Islamic arts — Arabic calligraphy, geometric pattern and design, architecture, and a lot of those details infused the book.” [New Statesman]

Creators | Collaborators Greg Rucka and Rick Burchett discuss their new steampunk-adventure webcomic Lady Sabre & the Pirates of the Ineffable Aether. [The Long & Shortbox of It]

Creators | Shawn Martinbrough is profiled in the New York Daily News, pegged to his upcoming work with Robert Kirkman, Nick Spencer and others on Skybound’s Thief of Thieves. [New York Daily News]

Creators | James Kochalka sits down for an interview with The A.V. Club Philadelphia. [The A.V. Club]

Creators | David Hahn talks briefly abut his Image Comics miniseries All Nighter: “I have always liked writing female characters, usually because I like to draw them, but also because women in general are not physically confrontational.  It makes me make the character smarter, because brute force wouldn’t be an acceptable or realistic way for a female character to solve a problem or deal with an enemy. One thing that helps me in this is when I see what not to do, usually when I watch movies or TV. I hate seeing writing done on auto pilot, where a writer is making a character speak or act in a way that is congruent with how the writer has seen other similar characters act, and not thinking about how this particular character would behave.” [The Daily Blam]

Creators | Esther Keller talks to Carla Jablonski, creator of the graphic novel trilogy Resistance, which follows the adventures of several young people in Nazi-occupied France. [Good Comics for Kids]

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Comments

7 Comments

“I have always liked writing female characters, usually because I like to draw them, but also because women in general are not physically confrontational. It makes me make the character smarter, because brute force wouldn’t be an acceptable or realistic way for a female character to solve a problem or deal with an enemy.”

I get it. Women tend to have smaller statures then men. But to say it isn’t “realistic” or “acceptable” for a woman to use “brute force” in solving problems is sexist (Um, Wonder Woman and She-Hulk?). Plus to say that he enjoys writing women so he can draw them just digs him in a little deeper. Woman are worth writing so you get to draw their slammin’ bodies…please.

You should enjoy writing and drawing women to blow these types of stereotypes out of the water. How many times have we seen physically inferior women with their breasts heaving out of their low cut outfits feature a power that uses their mind (telekinesis, telepathy, magic, etc.)?

Challenge yourself as a writer and us as readers. You might be surprised.

Thanks for the link, Brigid. You’re right, that post started as a link roundup, but then I found myself ranting, so I went with it. More balanced coverage of the New DCU 52 is coming later today at the site from KC.

“You should enjoy writing and drawing women to blow these types of stereotypes out of the water.”

I’m not sure that saying “you should enjoy” is ever really helpful; folks like what they like, and I can’t think of anything wrong with liking to draw pretty girls.

Jump to conclusions much, Comicredux? I actually read the interview (from the thoughtfully included link), and I didn’t catch any reference to “slammin’ bodies”. And judging by the illustrations from All Nighter (which is all in the world I know about his work), he doesn’t exactly specialize in spandex-clad cheesecake super heroines.
So, he likes to draw women. Hey, some people like to draw buildings; some like to draw trees. What do you make of that?

“In no time, iPads are going to be good enough, and it’s going to be easy enough, and it’s going to come out the same day where people are going to just read their comics on their iPads.”

People are reading comics on their iPads today! Get your head out of the sand. Android tablets work great, too.

@Kirk Teeters: Really because i read the article too & that was exactly what they were saying. This constant bullship that we keep on hearing about female characters in comics has to stop… Do you know the only differents between male characters in comics & female characters in comics? One has Boobs… Thats it.

Beyond that, the writer was just making incredibly sexist sweeping generalizations about both genders. There is nothign intrinsicly non combative about women… Anyone who spent any time time observing them can tell you that.

@Jay Seaver: There is nothing wrong with appreciating the female form and depicting it in imagery. The first amendment protects everyone’s right to free speech and I encourage Hahn to exercise his by drawing women the whole live long day. I used the word “should” to show how I wished we were striving toward an ideal: a depiction of woman free of gender stereotypes.

@Kirk Teeters: I read the interview as well and I see no need for you to be so condescending to me. Also, if you noticed I didn’t put slammin’ bodies in quotations, you know, those things you use to show a direct quote from source material?

As for my referencing “spandex-clad cheesecake super heroines,” I was doing so to illustrate the fact that this is a pervasive problem that is in the medium’s highest selling genre. Therefore, in more “subtle” creator owned work like All Nighter, I look for something more.

For an example of an awesome female character, take Casey from Morning Glories. She’s hot. She smart. But make no mistake, she’ll kick your ass. Then we have Hunter. He’s a little goofy looking. He’s not the brightest. Just about anyone can kick his ass. Here are gender stereotypes flipped on their heads and it makes for damn fine reading. And not one of them are wearing an inch of spandex…

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