Robot 6

Comics A.M. | Sparkplug to continue; Michael George in jail

Sparkplug Books

Publishing | Emily Nilsson, wife of Sparkplug Books publisher Dylan Williams, said she plans to continue running the publishing company after the death of her husband. “We need your support now as much as ever,” she said in a post on the Sparkplug blog. “We are grieving at the same time as we are trying to keep business afloat, and trying not to overstrain ourselves. We want to publish again soon but that is a step we will consider more once we get through the next few months.” Nilsson, Virginia Paine and Tom Neely will continue to run Sparkplug, with plans to continue online sales and attend conventions like the upcoming MIX in Minneapolis next month and the Brooklyn Comics and Graphics Festival in December. Williams passed away in September due to complications from cancer. [Sparkplug]

Legal | Michael George, the former comics retailer found guilty of murder for the second time, is in the Macomb County (Mich.) jail after his bond was revoked following Tuesday’s verdict. George was found guilty of murdering his first wife Barbara in the back of their comic book store in 1990. “The family’s ecstatic,” said Barbara’s brother Joe Kowynia. “There’s no way a jury is going to get this wrong twice. I feel sorry for my nieces, this is long overdue. Now that this is over, Barb can rest in peace. And we can move on and he can rot in jail.” [Detroit Free Press]

Creators | Brian Heater talks to Art Spiegelman about MetaMaus, his book about the making of Maus. [Publishers Weekly]

Marjane Satrapi

Controversy | Nessma TV president Nebil Karoui apologized for airing the animated version of Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis in Tunisia, as one scene from the movie led to an attempted arson attack by a mob at the station. The offending scene concerns an old, bearded image of God, of whom all depictions are forbidden by Islam. “I am sorry for all the people who were disturbed by this sequence, which also shocked me,” Karoui said. “I believe that to have broadcast this sequence was a mistake. We never had the intention of attacking sacred values.” [Independent Online]

Comics | Brian Truitt talks to writers Stan Lee and Terry Dougas about Romeo and Juliet: The War, their upcoming science fiction-via-Shakespeare graphic novel. [USA Today]

Comics | Fantagraphics publisher Gary Groth talks to Geoff Boucher about the publisher’s upcoming Carl Barks collections. [Hero Complex]

Robert Kirkman

Creators | Robert Kirkman discusses the upcoming second season of AMC’s The Walking Dead, the comic series, various Skybound projects and more. [Fangoria]

Creators | Mike Allred talks about his as-yet-unfinished and out-of-print Golden Plates series, which adapts the Book of Mormon into comic book form. [Slate]

Creators | Alan Moore discusses his current non-comics projects, including the novel Jerusalem, as well as his feelings on comics: “At the moment I feel an awful lot of my comic career is behind me, particularly all of the superhero stuff – the stuff that’s owned by American corporations. I want to distance myself from that, so the stuff I’m proudest of is what I own: From Hell, Lost Girls, The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen. I don’t read my earlier work because there are too many unpleasant associations with it. I don’t have a copy of Watchmen in the house. I’m glad the work is out there in the world, having an effect, but it’s like I’ve gone through a messy divorce.” [Metro]

DC Comics

Commentary | Tom Spurgeon shares nine thoughts on “potential advantages [DC Comics] might enjoy moving forward,” as they move into the second month of the New 52 relaunch. [The Comics Reporter]

Retailing | Caleb Goellner speaks with comics retailers about how they’re coping with the current marketplace and economic factors, and how customers can help shops remain stable during tough times. [ComicsAlliance]

Comics | The Washington Post’s Wonkblog has an early look at Health Care Reform: What It Is, Why It’s Necessary, How It Works, possibly the wonkiest graphic novel ever, written by MIT professor and health-reform architect Jonathan Gruber and illustrated by Nathan Schreiber. [Wonkblog]

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Comments

2 Comments

The cognitive dissonance of Moore griping about superhero comics and then talking up League of Extraordinary Gentlemen is like…well, the cognitive dissonance of Moore griping about sexual violence in comics and then talking up League of Extraordinary Gentlemen.

Michael George owned the comic shop I frequented in college. It still a but unreal to think of all this murder stuff.

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