Robot 6

Comics A.M. | Sony’s PSP Comic Store to close Oct. 30

PSP Comic Store

Digital comics | Sony is shutting down its PSP Comic Store as of Oct. 30. After that, readers will no longer be able to purchase new comics from the store, although they will be able to download at least some previously purchased comics until January 2013. After that, the whole thing is just gone. Sony pulled something similar in Japan, but its new PS Vita store includes a manga service. The PSP doesn’t seem to have been a very popular medium for reading comics in the United States, but it’s too bad that those who did take a chance on it have no way to permanently preserve their comics in a way that isn’t dependent on an aging piece of hardware. [Engadget]

Publishing | The Brooklyn Daily chats a bit with Sean Howe, the writer of Marvel Comics: The Untold Story, whose book includes an account of Marvel founder Martin Goodman, a Brooklynite who gave Stan Lee his first gig but was barely remembered by the company when he died. [Brooklyn Daily]

Conventions | Local journalist Cate McKissick turns in a very nice con report on the Hershey Comic Con, interviewing a number of local creators and fans, avoiding cliches, and acknowledging non-superhero comics. There’s a nice gallery of cosplay photographs, too. [PennLive.com]

Conventions | Morgantown will play host this weekend to the first West Virginia Popular Culture Convention, whose guest list includes Kyle Higgins, Ron Frenz, Billy Tucci, Robert Tinnell, Neil Vokes, Bo Hampton, Mark Wheatley and James Patrick. [The Associated Press]

Comics Code Authority

History | Paul Gravett writes about the history of the Comics Code Authority, the anti-comics hysteria that preceded it, and its gradual demise as publishers pulled out one by one. [Paul Gravett]

Creators | In an interview that’s liberally sprinkled with his whimsical drawings, Ben Hatke talks about his new book Legends of Zita the Spacegirl, his work process and his other comics. [Seven Impossible Things Before Breakfast]

Creators | Tom Spurgeon interviews Adrian Tomine at length about his comics and illustration work, his relationship with Drawn and Quarterly, and his new book, New York Drawings. [The Comics Reporter]

Creators | Joshua Dysart discusses his work on Valiant’s relaunch of Harbinger. [Sequart]

C. Spike Trotman

Creators | In an interview conducted at the Small Press Expo, Patrick Smith talks to hard-working cartoonist C. Spike Trotman about Templar, Arizona, Poorcraft and the Smut Peddler anthology. [Spandexless]

Creators | Also at SPX, Smith interviews Wizzywig creator Ed Piskor. [Spandexless]

Creators | Artist Nate Powell marks the 20th anniversary of his first comic, the self-published D.O.A., which was sold via a local comics shop and also via Nate’s backpack at school, in North Little Rock, Arkansas. [See My Brother Dance]

Advice | Gene Luen Yang has some advice for aspiring cartoonists, and it’s not the usual — he suggests they figure out whether they place a higher value money or self-expression and choose their path accordingly; also, it seems to take about ten years to become financially self-sufficient as a comics creator. [Gene Luen Yang's blog]

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Comments

14 Comments

Well Goodman did try to topple Marvel and raid all their best talent with his ill fated Atlas/Seaboard publishing group. Guess that resentment ran pretty deep. Shame though. His business savvy and ruthlessness went a long way to making Marvel number one.

“The PSP doesn’t seem to have been a very popular medium for reading comics in the United States, but it’s too bad that those who did take a chance on it have no way to permanently preserve their comics in a way that isn’t dependent on an aging piece of hardware.”

But…but…I thought digital comics were the utopian dream come true, which would surely appeal to millions of kids who like video games. At least, endless editorials suggested as much for years and years, their authors shaming anyone who suggested that anyone who tried to temper their pathologically gullible idealism had to be a mean old reactionary technophobe.

EDIT: I meant “…their authors suggesting that anyone who tried to temper their pathologically gullible idealism had to be a mean old reactionary technophobe.”

“it’s too bad that those who did take a chance on it have no way to permanently preserve their comics in a way that isn’t dependent on an aging piece of hardware.”

Pirates, as always, are unaffected.

ADDING: Man, that Goodman piece is not very good.

“Story lines that have pitted hero against hero would surprise Goodman if he were alive”? Really? Yeah, because the X-Men and Avengers totally never fought each other in the 1960′s.

If Goodman were surprised by AvX, the surprise would be that it took more than one issue to tell it.

“Digital comics | Sony is shutting down its PSP Comic Store as of Oct. 30. After that, readers will no longer be able to purchase new comics from the store, although they will be able to download at least some previously purchased comics until January 2013. After that, the whole thing is just gone. Sony pulled something similar in Japan, but its new PS Vita store includes a manga service. The PSP doesn’t seem to have been a very popular medium for reading comics in the United States, but it’s too bad that those who did take a chance on it have no way to permanently preserve their comics in a way that isn’t dependent on an aging piece of hardware. [Engadget]”

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This is just more proof why digital isn’t the SOLE savior of the comic book industry.

the anti-digital hate in the comments here is interesting, don’t understand it–also, don’t really care either way, just curious about such biting feelings? Haven’t bought any digital stuff myself, just not my medium.
Also, I’ll say that the abstract seems to make this piece seem more about the platform than the digital format anyway; its not saying digital comics aren’t working, it’s saying the sps format hasn’t caught on.

The closing of the PSP comic store is heartbreaking to me. Even though I didn’t buy all my comics there, I rebought many of my favorites just so I could carry around a satisfying library right in my pocket. I think this is a real shame.

The anti-digital comments are funny; the PSP comics didn’t fail because of digital comics, but because of comics tied to a specific piece of hardware that had a tiny screen that everyone knew would age out and be replaced by PSP2 or whatever. If you’re in to comics and like digital, your viewer of choice was never going to be the PSP. This failure is not one of digital comics, but one of platform/presentation.

The real shock here isn’t that digital comics failed on the PSP. Madden failed on the PSP. No one suggests Madden is dead because of that.

No, the shock here is that people still use and buy PSPs instead of the hundreds of phones and tablets that do the exact same thing (most of which do those functions better) plus have other functions like being able to place phone calls or the wild ability of fitting in one’s pants pocket (obviously refering to the phones here), as well as having tens of thousands of games cheapers that even the PSP Minis. As to the regular games: who but the top 1% of the 1% would buy a $40-50 portable video game in 2012?

PSP devotees deserve to get screwed for wasting so much money on something so antiquated as a portable game sysytem in 2012 and expecting it to stay modern. Next you’ll be bellyaching because you can’t get Green Day on your 8-track.

Plus, even a lot of the people that support the idea of digital comics admit that only being able to access the comics from a database somewhere and not being able to just download the comics was going to have a high likely-hood of coming to bite the customers in the ass.

And the only reason I bought a PSP was so I can play PSX games.

@Me: I got a PSP3000 a year ago, after it was marked down to $130, and I’m pleased with my purchase. While I appreciate my phone as a gaming platform, some games do not lend themselves to touchscreen play, and while I can add an external controller to my phone, that rather negates the point of it being a device that fits in my pocket.

I think the PSP is a neat, versatile, hacker-friendly machine.

But I don’t know why anyone would want to read comics on it.

Or on a phone, for that matter.

Despite what kind of historical perspectives or angles can be studied about the “paranoia” of the CCA, Wertham’s opus set the tone of that, whether he intentionally did so or otherwise, advocated it or otherwise.

@ Me
No phone or tablet does what the PSP does (relating to gaming) better. When you’re not blocking your own view of the action with clumsy controls, you’re waving and tilting the tablet around or frantically swiping your fingers all over it like a moron. I have yet to be convinced that portable gaming (beyond Sony and Nintendo’s efforts) has any real depth. (e.g. Angry Birds is just Worms with the strategy ripped out).

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