Robot 6

A sneak peek into Abrams/SelfMade Hero’s plans for 2013

Continuing our look into what comics and graphic novels lie in wait for us in the year 2013, I thought I’d take a look at Abrams catalog, which also includes books from British publisher SelfMade Hero, which Abrams distributes in the U.S. Here’s what I discovered:

How to Fake a Moon Landing: The Truth Behind Science Denial by Darryl Cunningham. From the author of Psychiatric Tales comes this collection of essays examining various conspiracy theories on topics like whether vaccinations cause autism or whether fracking is safe. Cunningham methodically and judiciously shoots down holes in the arguments of those who deny the existence of evolution and climate change, so if you’re the type who doesn’t like your cherished truths to be blown apart by facts, you might want to avoid this. All others should check it out. Cunningham’s no slouch. April, $16.95

Raven Girl by Audrey Niffenegger. An original folk tale in the vein of The Crane Wife, about a postman and a raven that fall in love, and the half-bird, half-human child that results from their coupling. From the author of The Night Bookmobile. May, $19.95.

Good Riddance: An Illustrated Memoir of Divorce by Cynthia Copeland. Apparently a true story about the author’s discovery of her husband’s affair and how it led to the break-up of her marriage. Could be really good. Could be awful. Have to wait and see. May, $17.95

Bazooka Joe and His Gang by the Topps Company. Talk about timely. On the heels of Topps announcement that they would no longer be including comics in their bubblegum comes this coffee-table pean to the eyepatch wearing, joke-slinging character and his friends, with a special look at Wesley Morse, the original illustrator for Bazooka Joe. Expect to have bittersweet feelings reading this. May, $19.95.

Legends of the Blues by William Stout. Not to be confused with Robert Crumb’s series of trading cards, this is basically a series of portraits of classic R&B musicians like Muddy Waters and Bessie Smith. It’s more art book than comic book, but Stout’s a pretty amazing illustrator. May, $19.95

Out of Line: The Art of Jules Feiffer. I believe this was supposed to come out earlier this year, but it looks like it’s been pushed back a few months. Certainly if anyone deserves a career retrospective book, it’s Feiffer. May, $40.

SelfMade Hero

Hair Shirt by Pat McEown. The artist behind Grendel: War Child delivers this story of childhood sweethearts that try to reunite many years later but find their past secrets and memories make it difficult for them to reconcile. Looks interesting. March, $24.95.

Black Paths by David B. The man behind Epileptic gets all historical fictiony on us, with this tale of a fledgling romance set in a city that is trying to gain independence from the Austro-Hungarian empire circa 1919. I’ll buy pretty much anything David B. does. He won my confidence long ago. March, $24.95

When David Lost His Voice by Judith Vanistendael. The day David’s granddaughter is born he discovers he has cancer. He tries to soldier on silently, while the women in his life try to deal with the possibility of losing him. Expect a lot of heartbreak with this one. March $24.95

The Case of Charles Dexter Ward by H.P. Lovecraft, adapted by I.N.J. Culbard. Culbard adapts Lovecraft’s tale of a dangerous inmate that escapes a mental ward to the bafflement of the police. April, $19.95.

The Complete Don Quixote, adapted by Rob Davis. Miguel Cervantes’ classic is given the graphic novel treatment. April, $27.50

Sandcastle by Pierre Oscar Levy and Frederik Peeters. A group of tourists idling by an idyllic beach discover the body of a dead woman. And then things start getting weird. I didn’t care much for Peeters last work published in the U.S., Blue Pills, but this one certainly looks intriguing. May, $19.95

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Comments

3 Comments

Peters last work in US is not Blue Pills, but Koma (published by Humanoids). Peters is a great cartoonist and I believe Blue Pills won an award in Angouleme.

“so if you’re the type who doesn’t like your cherished truths to be blown apart by facts, you might want to avoid this.”

But isn’t this book supposed to be for those people?

I’m not sure why Selfmadehero books are so slow coming to North America, Black Path came out in the U.K. and Ireland in July 2011 and Peeters had another book released here in October, Pachyderme

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