Robot 6

The big deal behind Gail Simone’s firing from Batgirl

NY Times Best Seller Batgirl: The Darkest Reflection

The Internet hand-wringing was set to overdrive when it was announced writer Gail Simone had been summarily dismissed from Batgirl. By email, no less. Virtually every comics news site and blog chimed in, usually followed by a flurry of reader comments. However, freelance creators are let go from comics all of the time. Sure there’s usually disappointment, and it’s never good when someone loses her job. But what made this the event of the week?

There’s a history to this that adds an extra layer of emotion.

Simone is a well-liked creator with a spirited fan base, and she has described Batgirl as a dream job for her. This is the character that hooked her into comics. This is the character she’s always wanted to write. Her dream came true, and now it’s being taken away. So any human being with at least an average level of empathy is going to feel like this is an unfortunate turn of events for her. This was also largely unexpected, as the series was performing well; Batgirl #14 was No. 17 on Diamond Comic Distributors’ November sales chart with an estimated 77,468 copies, although previous issues sold in the 40,ooo to 50,000 range. That’s where some shock and indignation comes in. It seems like an unfair decision (although it is of course fully within DC Comics’ rights to hire and fire whoever it wants).

Going further back, it becomes clear why this is such a hot button. First is the character herself: When DC announced its lineup last year for the New 52, Batgirl first seemed like a doomed book. It took a well-liked character, the wheelchair-bound Oracle, and restored her ability to walk that she viciously lost at the hands of the Joker in The Killing Joke. This felt like an insensitive move when the disabled in the real world are still waiting for their retcon. “But Professor X regains the ability to walk every other year,” some retorted, in the newest version of “everyone does it.” Representation in media is an issue that can apply to more than just gender.

The awkwardness of the announcement was eased somewhat by news that Batgirl would be written by Simone. A woman would be writing a comic book with a female lead. Yes, this was actually a big deal and a big relief for fans of the character and for female readers. You see, another issue during the big launch of the New 52 (and there were quite a number, weren’t there?) was the serious lack of female creators, which had dropped from 12 percent to 1 percent. That 1 percent basically consisted of Simone herself (artist Amy Reeder was announced as an alternating artist on Batwoman and wouldn’t debut until Issue 6). The issues around gender became so heated, it resulted in a tense interaction between DC Co-Publisher Dan DiDio and a fan at a comic book convention, a flurry of editorials, and eventually DC issuing a statement promising to be more sensitive to the issue. More women creators were eventually announced, but interest in how Batgirl would perform remained.

So with all of that pent-up tension, Batgirl actually turned out to be pretty good. It launched with strong sales and positive reviews. Simone’s handling of the cured paralysis was actually sensitive, addressing post-traumatic stress disorder, and well-informed, pulling from real-life cases treated in South Africa. That an entertaining superhero comic could come out of all that controversy and debate was probably a miracle and spoke volumes to Simone’s skills as a writer. For those that were so invested in the discussions, it seemed like a validation of sorts.

In the end, it really wasn’t just another freelance job. Batgirl represented a monthly victory in the ongoing fight against institutionalized sexism in mainstream comics.

But it’s not the end for Simone. So instead I choose to celebrate the coming of the graphic novel Leaving Megalopolis by Gail Simone and Jim Calafiore. Fortunately, the odds of Simone firing herself from her own book are low.

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Comments

57 Comments

Got to say, I agree with a lot of this, but it’s ridiculous to point to sales as being strong while providing the sales number for issue #14: A cross over with Batman that doubled the sales of Batgirl. The title was selling approximately half of that level prior to the cross over and those are the numbers that should have been reflected in this article.

I’ll take the blame for that; I inserted that tidbit without realizing the issue was part of a crossover. I’ve expanded to include the range of the previous issues, which were 40,000-50,000 — still solid by today’s standards for a “non-core” title. (Sorry, Corey!)

One thing that was left out of this article was Simone’s history with Barbara Gordon dating back to “Birds of Prey.” Now this is a double-edged sword, because on the one hand, Barbara Gordon has become as attached to Simone as Daredevil had become to Miller, *but* unless sales are at the top, the idea of Simone *still* writing Batgirl isn’t going to set the world on fire or draw in new readers. The powers that be are always going to want to shake things up as a way to boost sales and getting a new writer is one of the standard ways that it’s done.

Being fired by email, though – that’s a bit cold…

“In the end, it really wasn’t just another freelance job. Batgirl represented a monthly victory in the ongoing fight against institutionalized sexism in mainstream comics.”

That’s quite some ridiculous hyperbole.. Batgirl represented just another Bat book, one that apparently wasn’t doing as well as a Bat book should.

Does no one else think it’s somewhat telling that every story involving Simone has to be about sexism in the comics industry? Doesn’t that put an unfair pressure on anyone judging her work on it’s own merits?

Sometimes, a mediocre writer with a small but loud following is just a mediocre writer with a small but loud following, regardless of gender, race or creed.

I would question the idea that Batgirl seemed like a “doomed book” when the new 52 launched. As a store owner, my thought was that it would be a very solid seller, bringing back a version of the character that customers had been clamoring for for years. I don’t know of anyone who was surprised by the success the title had.

It sucks for Simone, sure. But to state the firing of her is another example of “institutionalized sexism” is ridiculous. The book wasn’t selling as well as DC wanted it to, and while Simone is a good writer, that’s all she is. The difference between her and the litany of other mediocre writers fired from books is the fact she has ovaries.

The problem I have with the whole “there aren’t enough women in comics” thing, is that there aren’t that many GREAT female writers. Part of this could be due to the possibility of women only just starting to enter the field so the numbers are low, or maybe female writers just aren’t interested in writing cape and cowl books. The idea that someone gets a better chance at a job because of their gender (which is what is happening with the whole “more women in comics” thing) is sexism.

A book staring a female lead doesn’t NEED to be written by a woman in the same way a book with a male lead doesn’t need to be written by a guy. And you don’t need to have the same genitalia as the book’s lead to enjoy the story, regardless of what countless people claim.

@Daniel

Thanks for taking the time to tell the rest of us what this wasn’t about. Your expert opinion is surely appreciated.

I don’t know, Daniel, mediocre writers don’t write series like Secret Six. As for not doing as well as a Bat book should, it did show a late increase in sales, beyond the crossover issue itself, and it wasn’t performing as poorly as, say, Batwing.

@richard

The book was selling just fine by all accounts.

But thanks for enlightening us all on the plight of the female writer and what it takes to write female characters effectively.

I’m confused. Why was she fired?

Pirahna Plant, you’re mistaking expertise with just plain common sense.
And no need to thank me for offering my opinion. That’s what these comment sections are for :)

#17 is nothing to balk at–especially since it was one of DC’s few victories amid a Marvel dominated top-sellers list. Simone deserved a phone call at the very least.

The real shock isn’t that it was her, that she’s a female, or that she’s a women writing a female character and was fired.

It’s that nobody deserves to be fired by email, regardless of their gender or (perceived) performance.

The book was not selling well by any account. It was the lowest selling book with the word Bat in it in October other than Batwoman, and this before the crossover goosed its numbers. These are some basic facts that get ignored in the frenzy about “institutionalized sexism” in comics, a claim I have yet to see backed up by any evidence. Simone may be the “best female writer in comics” but she is still just an average writer. Batgirl was not a doomed book. Quite the opposite, this is a book about a beloved female character who had never had her own series but who anchored a team book for a decade and was launching as part of the high selling Bat family of books. DC surely expected that these advantages would result in sales and when the first issue came out it was one of the hardest issues to find due to demand. But then as the series continued sales dropped, and that has to be on the creative team. So while the manner of her dismissal was stupid, the reasons behind it aren’t. This is not “institutionalized sexism”, this is a creator who happens to be female not delivering the goods and like Rob Liefeld before her, she is deservedly gone. It really is that simple

Aaron, I haven’t read Secret Six, I’m afraid.
By then I was already too weary of Simone to give another book her try. For someone who made a name for herself early on by targeting established pros with accusations of misogyny and sexism, her initial outing felt incredibly exploitative and heavy on the cheesecake. And the writing was not that impressive imho, so I didn’t remain a reader for long.

DC was around for decades before Simone got there and will be around long after she’s gone. The one clear message in all of this is that no one..NO ONE is indispensable. Also, I find it amusing that those who are most outraged by all of this were the ones who were calling Simone an “ableist” , “sellout” and “company woman” after taking on Batgirl when the Oracle character was axed. So spare us the crocodile tears and the hypocrisy.

is anyone looking at this in the context of other editorial/creative fiascos in DC’s 52, such as the problems with George Perez, Rob Liefeld, etc?

A female creator that was writing a fairly female accessible title in the male dominated genre of superhero comics and getting solid sales is a big deal and worth noting. Her getting canned via email over what sounds like editorial whatever is a big bag of bullshit. Especially when the longevity and health of comics as a medium is better served by opening inroads for non-traditionally targeted readers (ie: women) — even in the superhero genre.

It’s seems a very silly, short-sighted move.

Er, what I meant to say is, “Dis ain’t sexism, Simone suxxorsz, lololol41. Batman.”

ThatGuyWhoSaysStuff

December 12, 2012 at 1:28 pm

“Barbara Gordon has become as attached to Simone as Daredevil had become to Miller,”

This is a bit of hyperbole. Daredevil has run for years on fumes from Miller’s seminal run, one that is collected and cherished even today. I don’t think people are going to be talking about Simone’s work 30 years later.

Lol. I’m in a wheelchair and “This felt like an insensitive move when the disabled in the real world are still waiting for their retcon” is way more patronising than anything from any comic book. I obviously don’t speak for very person in a wheelchair but the idea ‘we’ would all be upset by this is farcical. Who cares? If anything I’m like “good for her.” People handling the infirm and disabled with kid gloves is much bigger problem.

Piranha – her solid sales are barely at twice the level when a big 2 book gets cancelled. This is a bat book about a decades old beloved character who appeared in the famous Adam West TV show. You have to do better than this to keep your job

Simone at the very least does have a vocal fanbase, but the only reason this was a big deal was that she was female and people thought it was an outrage to fire her by email. Yet I would be far happier to be fired by email than in person, especially considering in this particular profession, that’s the way most of these creators interact. It would have been a far bigger slap in the face to have her travel to New York (or L.A.) and fire her after that trip. Anyway, I think sales as well as the fact that she did one of those Kickstarter campaigns, is what led to this. Everyone thinks Kickstarter and crowdsourcing in general is the answer to everything these days, and in some cases it absolutely is, but people are going to learn that there’s a price to be paid for thinking your best option is to go that route. The question that hasn’t been asked is whether or not Simone offered “Magalopolis” to DC first, or simply decided to Kickstarter it. She was a creator who’d done that kind of project within the DC fold in the past. Although her fans were always vocal, she was never a creator whose name sold itself to casual fans. That may be one of the problems, whether or not you personally think she was a brilliant or mediocre writer (personally, I don’t think she was always inspired, whether or not her ideas stood out). To call “Megalopolis” the erstwhile sequel to a book she’d done for DC was a way for her to begin the distancing process herself. To my mind, DC came to the natural conclusion of this way of thinking.

@richard

Wishing for more female creators is not sexism, it’s more like trying to reach a more equitable balance of gender perspective-ism. No one is saying that publishers and editors should be forced into hiring unqualified female writers and artists. But have you ever considered that maybe (just maybe) some qualified female talent is being overlooked simply because of tradition, stereotyping and other misconceptions. When 90% of comics are written and drawn by men, I think something other than skill is keeping women from occupying those roles. Gail Simone getting turfed by DC wouldn’t be AS big a deal, if the creator gender breakdown was closer to 50/50.

“Fortunately, the odds of Simone firing herself from her own book are low.”

Well, I’m self-employed, and I think about firing myself all the time on the basis of my poor attitude, inconsistent schedule and primadonna theatrics.

Unfortunately I’m just not sure I could sucker anyone else into working for such insulting wages. :D

Quite frankly, I glad that there’s gonna be new writer. And while Simone’s Secret Six was great title her “dream jobs” tend to be lackluster at best and painfully dull at worst – that was case with WW, second coming on BoP and with Batgirl. She simply so much better with black humor series that consist of characters she can build from the ground.

When 90% of the comics audience is male, it is not a surprise that 90% of the creators are too. I am all for equality of opportunity but not an artificial equality of results. The best female creators have all passed through DC’s doors at some point so the opportunity is there. With DC in particular, the company has been run at one level or another by women for some time, from Jeanette Khan’s decades long run to Karen Berger running Vertigo to what’s her name running DC now for Warner’s. This hardly seems like an environment that has institutionalized sexism. The majority of talent is make but reports to women.

When a male writer gets fired, it’s business. When a female writer gets fired, it’s INSTITUTIONALIZED SEXISM! ZOMG~!

Theflyingdachshund

December 12, 2012 at 2:14 pm

I read in these comments that someone mentioned Batgirl as the lowest selling title with the word “bat” in it…. Doesn’t that honor belong to Batwing?

PS- @Jenn

“Gail Simone getting turfed by DC wouldn’t be AS big a deal, if the creator gender breakdown was closer to 50/50.”

You just proved Richard’s point. Congrats.

@Jeff_14 “When 90% of the comics audience is male, it is not a surprise that 90% of the creators are too. I am all for equality of opportunity but not an artificial equality of results. ”

Where’s the source for your statistic?

@Theflyingdachshund Batwing already had a creative change.

Last laugh – this is based on my observations if who buys comics at stores, who goes to conventions, who posts on message boards, etc. where is your evidence that its wrong?

I mentioned Batgirl being the second lowest title with the word Bat in it. All low selling Bat titles have had creative changes. This is just part of a trend

MAN, there are a lot of DC staffers here posting under assumed names. Wow.

Percane – I think there are a lot of people who are looking at it in that way. I wrote an article exploring the idea that DC’s biggest mistake wasn’t Simone’s firing itself, but how it was handled (abruptly, by e-mail, via the new editor rather than one with whom she had a relationship, less than a week after Karen Berger left). All of that speaks to a short-sightedness on the part of upper management that ties in with many of the other problems we’ve heard since the relaunch.

I assume that’s an example of irony “Mark Waid” ;)

Do you blink the fact that there’s so few women in comics has something to do with, say, I don’t know, the fact that so few women read them in the first place? Some guy said 90% of readers are male and I’d guess that was about accurate. I in 10 people who are buying comics are female. There does need to be more amen writers and artists but

a) Only if they’re good enough

and

b) Only if they’re good enough.

Saying that there’s plenty of bad male writers and artists in the industry at the moment so I suppose it’s only fair they get some bad female ones too. I definitely don’t think it’s sexism. There have been plenty of women in high ranking positions at Marvel and DC over the years. Are people really insinuating DC were like, “SHE’S A WOMEN, BOOOO!” There have been plenty of people getting kicked off books recently and she’s one of them. I’ve bought Simone’s Batgirl since issue one, and the book’s fine, but it’s far from outstanding. I think Batwing is all round a better book and that’s selling fewer issues. I’m definitely not punching the walls because of her exit. I feel sorry for her but she’ll get another gig instantly.

@DiRT
“You just proved Richard’s point. Congrats.”
Ah. no. richard’s point was as follows: hiring females just because they are female is sexist.
I specifically stated that publishers shouldn’t be forced to hire unqualified female creators. And if there were more gender parity in the industry, (specifically from the Big Two), then firing one female creator (regardless of her talent, accolades, etc.) wouldn’t be AS big a deal (note the emphasis on “AS”; it would still be newsworthy). However, it’s a huge deal when there are so few women currently working on the creative side. Based on the actual numbers of male vs female creators currently working, if a publisher was considering hiring one of two creators of equal talent, one male, one female. Take a guess as to which one would likely be chosen. History clearly shows that the man wins most of the time.

@Jeff_14 The worst thing about anecdotal evidence is that it’s different for everyone. Granted, the gender breakdown in my LCS is mostly male, but it’s closer to 60/40 than 90/10. Also, 2 of the 4 staffers there are female and are big comic book geeks.

I’ve been going to a lot of comic book stores in my 25 years in the hobby and talked to a lot of people about this and haven’t seen any evidence of female participation over 10-20%. Find me some evidence that this is wrong.

What is your evidence of this theoretical 1 man vs 1 woman for the same job and the man always winning? Are there any published stats on this or are you just saying something you want to believe is true?

For those mentioning Batgirl wasn’t selling as well as a Bat-title should and that is (perhaps) the reason Simone was let go, then why wasn’t the same done to J.H. Williams III? Batwoman sells less than Batgirl! Check the sales reports.
There are other issues involved in the firing. Sales numbers was definitely not one of them. If DC believes they are going to do substantially better with someone else at the helm, I believe they will find themselves to be sadly mistaken. There may be a very short term bump up (as happens sometimes when a new creative team takes over a title), but that correction will quickly be erased.

Well I gotta say, her writng was seriously slipping to look back at secret six it was way better than firestorm, and i didnt batgirl was any good so i dropped i. With characters like gretel the book felt very generic

Zombie, how can you say sales was “definitely” not part of the problem? It is indisputable that Batgirl is near the bottom of Bat titles in terms of sales. This is the most recognizable bat character other than Batman and Robin and who is famous from the Adam West series on. Batwoman by contrast is virtually unknown. Only dedicated comic fans have ever heard of her and this incarnation is completely different from the original character who had next to no recognition at all. This is why Batwoman us in the doldrums even with creators recognized for their quality. Batwoman was recognized as being the most striking book last year and even this has not kept it off of life support. Due to its low sales it probably will be cancelled soon. Batgirl though is a franchise character so DC is justifiably willing to switch talent to salvage the book

In October, Batgirl was the best-selling Bat title that didn’t feature Batman and wasn’t a #1 (Talon). Batgirl outsold Nightwing, Catwoman (who I would argue has more recognition to the general public than Batgirl, based solely on the fact that she was just in a blockbuster movie a few months ago), Batwoman and Batwing … plus it outsold Wolverine and the X-Men, Green Lantern New Guardians, Fantastic Four and Wonder Woman, all of which probably have more name recognition with the general public than she does. Wonder Woman is one of the most recognizable female heroines, if not *the* most recognizable. Wonder Woman’s creative team remains intact.

I don’t think the sales theory holds water, and I don’t think that the theory that Batgirl should be some kind of sales juggernaut because she was on TV 50 years ago does, either. If sales were the only reason they made this change–and we’re only speculating here because DC hasn’t given a reason–then there are a lot of other books selling less than Batgirl that have intact creative teams.

If I were Mr. Waid, I’d concentrate less on comments about Simone and more on why the first issue of Hulk was such a snooze. I’d also acknowledge that I swiped much of the content in the first issue of Hulk from What If volume one #2. Some of us have memories as long as you, Mr. Waid. Tsk tsk.

“In October, Batgirl was the best-selling Bat title that didn’t feature Batman and wasn’t a #1 (Talon). Batgirl outsold Nightwing, Catwoman (who I would argue has more recognition to the general public than Batgirl, based solely on the fact that she was just in a blockbuster movie a few months ago), Batwoman and Batwing … plus it outsold Wolverine and the X-Men, Green Lantern New Guardians, Fantastic Four and Wonder Woman, all of which probably have more name recognition with the general public than she does. Wonder Woman is one of the most recognizable female heroines, if not *the* most recognizable. Wonder Woman’s creative team remains intact.”

Once again the fact that Gail’s army of message boards warriors always ignore when they scream about unbelievable succes of the series, October’s issue was a part of super-hyped Death in the Family Bat-event with cut-out cover. If you look at last “normal” Batgirl issue – August’s #12 – the sales were 43,804. And if you look at sales of Nu52 Batgirl debute – 107,055 – you’ll see that “astonishingly popular and adored by anyone with half-of-a-brain” Gail’s year-long tenure resulted in lose of 59% of readership or 63,251 copies.

“And while Simone’s Secret Six was great….. ”

But (unlike Batgirl) didn’t sell. As Simone herself has stated.

Repeat after me, folks:

DC does not care about female characters.

DC does not care about female readers.

DC does not care about female creators.

Why on earth is anyone surprised by this firing? What, did you think a decade of abusing female characters showed that DC was a GOOD place to be a woman writer? Did book after book full of sexualized violence make people think, boy howdy, I bet the folks who published this crap really want to hold onto women writers?

DC has published more female characters and used more female talent than Marvel ever has. How long do female character books last over there? They try She-Hulk and Captain Marvel every few years and that’s about it. DC has regularly published Wonder Woman, Supergirl, Catwoman, Black Canary and Batgirl (in some form, either on their own or in a female team book with each other) for decades. DC has been run by women at some level for decades. DC has had Simone, Amanda Conner, Amy Reeder, and others on books regularly for years to appease those that seem to make their buying decisions based on the gender of the writer. Women writers have clearly not been able to deliver what sells, even when they have the ability to tell stories that don’t feature “sexualized violence”. So DC does a great deal. What the supposed legions of female readers don’t do apparently is put their money where their mouth is. They must be reading at the library or in the store.

As for Batgirl outselling Wonder Woman, I note that Wonder Woman has been a perennial sales laggard for decades. Its current sales are actually high for that title on average, whereas Batgirl, as has been observed repeatedly, is one of the top 3 Bat characters in comics and despite the advantages of being the first solo series about Barbara Gordon and being written by “comics’ greatest female writer”, it can’t sell despite starting off very strong unless it crosses over with Death of the Family.

There is quite a lot of evidence for whty she was let go over sales. Whereas when I ask for evidence of this conspiracy against women that surely must be the real reason I hear chirping crickets. It’s actually frightening how readily some people can just fling accusations about the evil motives of men and their “sexist” character without even a shred of evidence. It sounds like Fox News in here

DC is far more female friendly than Marvel. They put out a She-Hulk or Ms. Marvel book every few years and that’s about it. DC has published Wonder Woman, Supergirl, Catwoman, Black Canary and Barbara Gordon (either on their own or together) continuously for decades. DC has had women running things in upper managements for decades. Female creators like Simone, Amanda Conner, Devin Grayson, Amy Reeder, Jill Thompson, Louise Simonson have all had regular work from DC for those who seem to base their buying decisions on the gender of the writer.. DC does its part. It seems the “legions of female readers” won’t put their money where their mouth is and buy the books. Must be reading at the library or in the store.

And Batgirl outselling WW is not unusual. WW has historically been a sales laggard. I believe its current sales are higher than avergae for the last decade or so. Whereas Batgirl has plummeted in sales under Simone’s watch despite having the built in advantage of being the third most recognizable Batman character, despite this being the first ever solo Barbara Gordon series, and despite having “comics’ greatest female writer”. It only does well when it ties in to someone else’s story.

I am concerned with how readily some people on here toss around accusations about men and their “obvious” prejudices without a shred of evidence to back it up, whereas I can find all sorts of practical and logical business reasons for why she was let go and somehow that seems less credible than these conspiracy theories about secret cabals of men trying to keep women down. It’s getting to be like Fox News in here.

Sorry about the double post. My browser didn’t show the first one for a while.

I’ve already stated my opinion on this matter in Robot6s previous article on this matter, but regarding the whole sexism thing:

Pretty much ALL fashion publications around the world are lead by female editorial staff with a healthy audience of readers who are male (a minority of which are even straight) and these publications still have higher sales numbers and ad revenue than comics books. The fact that there have always been more men in the comic industry is factually due to the nature that a larger percentage of boys and men gravitate towards these kinds of publications just as a larger percentage of women gravitate towards fashion publications.

I’m pointing out this fact as someone who is very supportive (and who will always be vocal) about positive female representation in comics — both in the page of them and behind the scenes.

@ Mark Waid. I figured as much, They’re not foolin’ anyone

“In the end, it really wasn’t just another freelance job. Batgirl represented a monthly victory in the ongoing fight against institutionalized sexism in mainstream comics.”

How sad… I don’t think Batgirl did that at all. Wonder Woman? Yes (for the first time in a long time). Supergirl? Yes (for the first time in long time). Batwoman? Uh, hell yeah. Sword of Sorcery? Yep.

But Batgirl? Batgirl was a mess from the beginning. A grown woman going back to calling herself Batgirl is silly but forgivable. But every issue had to remind you that Barbara’s been victimized in the past to assert her strength now. Instead of just moving on, Gail dragged it down into that cesspool of shallow psychology, dollar store grotesque, and terribly uninventive plots.

It did nothing for Batgirl.

“In the end, it really wasn’t just another freelance job. Batgirl represented a monthly victory in the ongoing fight against institutionalized sexism in mainstream comics.”

Hahahahahaha, no.

I’m sorry, but there is no more institutionalised sexism in comics, then there is in the rubbish truck driving industry. An absense of women in the industry doesn’t represent sexism, it represents a combination of lack of interest and/or skill.

Of course that isn’t all that suprising considering the majority of super hero comic book readers are male… Kind of like how romance novels are written primarily by women, which correlates with the fact that the majority of romance novel readers are female.

As for Gail herself, she was not fired. She was removed as the writer of Batgirl… Its not like there haven’t been half a dozen other writers over the last 24 months at the big two, who haven’t also been removed from writing duties on particular books for different reasons.

So lets stop being hyperbolic. Its a freelance job, DC doesn’t owe Gail, nor fans of Gail anything. Atleast take the situation with some the same level of grace Gail did.

the book stinks. out of 300 million people, only 30 to 40 thousand read this book, its a non entity in the world.the whole relaunch is pure crap. ive read comics for 40 years, and the relaunch has got to be the biggest bunch of garbage ive ever seen. saving me money tho, since im buying less then ever. evey issue of earth two we have to be reminded that allen snot is gay, every issue of bratgirl, we are told she was shot. its all crap. just garbage comics that will be forgotten way sooner than you think

“It was the lowest selling book with the word Bat in it in October other than Batwoman”

“out of 300 million people, only 30 to 40 thousand read this book”

Poor reasoning.

Crossovers are hardly exclusive to Batgirl. They are a realty of comics. As is Simone coming back to a strong selling book in this case. Not liking something is fine but using Bizarro World logic just makes critics look bitter or desperate.

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