Robot 6

The lesson of the comiXology blackout

ComiXology-Free1sMarvel

ComiXology had a sale and all I got was this JPEG

The crash of comiXology’s servers over the weekend brings home a nagging detail to digital comics that deserves renewed attention: the lack of a file for consumers to keep.

The current model for most digital comics providers is to offer access to files through a proprietary reader available through their apps or websites. It’s essentially a leasing arrangement, granting temporary access with an open-ended term limit. You can “download” a local copy, but this isn’t a true download. The file is returned to the provider’s cloud storage after a short period of inactivity, although access remains through your library on the reader.

All things being fine in the universe, that hasn’t caused many problems. There have been a few incidents of comics being yanked back into the archives either because of an inadvertent early release or because a publisher no longer wishes to sell a certain title, but by and large there haven’t been any issues with the current model. Some previously voiced reservations about that arrangement, yet theoretical concerns are often ignored or quickly forgotten until they become a reality. And they became a reality over the weekend.

ComiXology’s servers crashed right after the announcement at South by Southwest of a free offering of 700 Marvel comics. It was an exciting idea for a sale and promotion, and I have no doubt everyone involved had only the best of intentions. However, demand surpassed server capacity. Access to comiXology’s comics reader and cloud storage was unavailable for an extended period — essentially, the front door to comiXology’s vaults couldn’t be opened because everyone was pressing up against it, so no one got anything.

What makes this incident such a valuable, but unfortunate, example is that even people going to comiXology to buy and/or read comics unrelated to the Marvel promotion were affected. Perhaps more damaging was that this blackout also prohibited sales of every publisher and creator with content distributed through comiXology. It was the equivalent of Diamond Comic Distributors having a power outage, causing every comic book store in North America to go dark. And then a Diamond representative showed up at everyone’s house and threw a tarp over their comic collection, preventing us from reading comics we’d already bought. The cascade effect reveals the delicacy of this system. The infrastructure comiXology uses puts immense responsibility and burden on itself, but it doesn’t have to be this way.

The original call to arms for digital comics was that the comic book industry needed an iTunes. As most people know, buying music from the iTunes Store provides you with an MP3 or m4a, or some other music file for your computer. Originally there was a limitation on how many computers could play each song file, but this restriction was eventually removed. While Apple recently began providing a cloud storage service, you can opt out of it. A similar structure is used for digital books. The file format EPUB also allows the option of digital rights management (DRM) to limit the number of computers that can read the file or other sharing restrictions.

This is the model that needs to be adopted for digital comics. When I listen to music from my iTunes library, I’m not taxing Apple’s or Amazon’s servers, or those of any other digital music provider, unless I choose to keep music on their cloud storage. And if iTunes or Amazon go down, I can still play the music I’ve purchased: iTunes gives me a file to use however I wish in exchange for my money. I still use iTunes to play my music and keep track of my library. The same scenario can exist for comiXology and other digital comics providers by using .PDF, .CBR, .CBZ or some new file type. To comfort concerned intellectual property lawyers, these files can have DRM limitations so they can only be read on a set number of computers or devices, just like MP3s and EPUB files. I would prefer no such limitations, I’m willing to compromise if it will free us from this faux-download structure.

Publishers were originally nervous about handing over digital files for unfettered use, fearing they would end up on illegal file-sharing sites. The truth that I hope everyone knows by now is that those file-sharing sites will always be there. They’re still there for music. But usage has dropped considerably because, as has been proved through studies, when most people have a legal and official method to buy products, they’ll choose that over the hassle and risks of illegal channels. The more inconvenient you make it, the more they’re likely to turn to quick, free and illegal. In case it isn’t clear, having the whole infrastructure go dark for days falls under inconvenient.

Yes, it’s only happened once, but it will happen again. Playing it conservative on marketing events so another crash doesn’t occur isn’t the answer, as that would be a terrible way to run a business. More servers and bigger servers aren’t the answer either, although that probably wouldn’t hurt. The bigger solution is changing the infrastructure. Switching to a system of truly downloadable comics with a cloud storage option lessens the stress on the system, increases the value of the product, and demonstrates trust in your customers.

Now is not the time to handicap our potential for success and growth. The comics industry is finally on the upswing again thanks in part to the work done by comiXology and other digital providers like iVerse, as well as their publishing partners. They’ve helped bring in new readers, bring back lapsed readers, and increase print sales. That kind of innovative leadership mustn’t miss this opportunity to allow for future success.

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Comments

31 Comments

I’ve been saying this for some time now- comic book rentals are not the same as an iTunes purchase. If you bill it as purchasing, then, as a consumer, you should OWN it. Anything else is false advertising. If you go to a website such as DriveThruComics, where independents publish their stuff, you get an actual copy of the book, in pdf form. Maybe not the best way to read a comic but at least you own it. If for any reason you lose internet access you can still read your books. Or if you like a high-speed connection. As a purchaser, it is FAR more convenient when you can just open up your computer and read as opposed to having to log on to a site and do it that way. Personally, the ONLY digital comics I have purchased are ones that I will OWN.

I’d love to know just what sorts of conversations suddenly happened at comics publishers about the problem of having only a single digital distributor for their new releases.

@The One True b!x – Are you talking about true open competition with another provider carrying all content? Because Comixology seems to have seen off the competition by having a better product. Commercial darwinism at it’s finest… The flipside is the Dark Horse model I guess but i forget a lot about DH because they aren’t in the virtual store when i go browsing on new comic day…

Does anyone have the same compliants about the various movie/tv streaming services or is that just apples and oranges?

Also isn’t this returning this to the disposable medium comics used to be? I’m buying a lot of stuff digitally but in sales. And for 50 – 75% of it I’m never going to care if I don’t read it again… Anything real good i’ll store in tablet memory or by in paper but at least i don’t have the ‘forgotten’ stuff taking up space.

That’s not to say i wouldn’t like a file for keeps. I have a healthy and earned distrust of the cloud and network coverage and prefer local storage for most things…

IMHO

Servers crash. Houses burn down. People get stuck in traffic. Sometimes people might misplace their copy of “The Watchmen”. Irony.

The “leasing arrangement” for comic titles offered by comixology is most likely here to stay, and I’m all for it. It protects the material. It protects the livelihoods of all the very hard-working professionals in the industry, and it prevents piracy. It’s the future business model.

Does anyone want to download anything anymore anyways? Why collect gigabytes of image files on your hard drive when you can access them in cloud storage? In those rare times when the server crashes ( in this case, once ), there is that clause in the comixology agreement that stipulates that you understand what may happen when you purchase the service. I’m pretty sure everyone gets that by now.

If you really want 24/7 access to your comic, go buy a copy in print and be responsible for it yourself. Then carry it with you everywhere you go. You can’t have your cake and eat it too. Unless you’re a thief. Which is what all this really comes down to.

What’s this guy talking about? I could access all my purchased and downloaded comics during the entire crash on my tablet. I just couldn’t read the ones that weren’t downloaded before the crash. I also couldn’t buy anything. That’s it. Robot 6 is just making a lot of noise.

Leasing prevents privacy? How many new titles do you think are on Comixology that couldn’t be already found on any torrent site within 24-48 hours of release?

Personally, I only buy print. But if I’m going to be paying the same, or close to the same, for a digital representation that is costing the publisher a hell of a lot less, then I should own the bloody thing. By all means give people the choice of either cloud or localised storage, but it should be mine.

To recycle an analogy in the article, why doesn’t Marvel come around and take my print issue everytime I’m done reading it, and then deliver it back to me when I want to reread it, and then take it again, ad nauseum. Ignoring legality, there’s not much stopping me from scanning that and distributing it to everyone now that it’s in my possession.

There’s always a way around piracy prevention (as video games have often proven) so DRM becomes a kick in the grapes to loyal customers rather than a deterrent to potential buccaneers.

“Does anyone have the same compliants about the various movie/tv streaming services or is that just apples and oranges?”

It is apples and oranges because with those movie/TV streaming services, you’re usually renting the movies or TV shows. With Netflix and Hulu, you pay a subscription fee to access their content. If you rent a movie from iTunes or Vudu, you can stream it or you can download it and you have a certain amount of time in which you can watch.

But if you buy movies from these services, you download the file. Sure, if you have a streaming device, you can stream it from the servers. But you also have the option of a permanent download.

“The “leasing arrangement” for comic titles offered by comixology is most likely here to stay, and I’m all for it. It protects the material. It protects the livelihoods of all the very hard-working professionals in the industry, and it prevents piracy. It’s the future business model.”

Do me a favor and go to any torrent site. Do a search for comics. Look at how many torrents there are, some of them uploaded even before the digital releases. Then tell me with a straight face that this system prevents piracy. This isn’t the future business model, this is growing pains.

“Does anyone want to download anything anymore anyways? Why collect gigabytes of image files on your hard drive when you can access them in cloud storage? In those rare times when the server crashes ( in this case, once ), there is that clause in the comixology agreement that stipulates that you understand what may happen when you purchase the service. I’m pretty sure everyone gets that by now.”

As a matter of fact, yes. I want to download. Why collect gigabytes of image files? Because I paid for them and I want access to them whether I’m connected to the Internet or not. I download all my music and movies I buy from iTunes and store them on external hard drives. Memory is cheaper now than it has ever been. Several years ago, a 320 GB external hard drive cost around $100. Today, I can get a TB drive for that price.

You don’t want to download, that’s fine. But your situation is not everyone’s situation. No one’s saying get rid of cloud storage, but also offer local downloads for those who want it.

“If you really want 24/7 access to your comic, go buy a copy in print and be responsible for it yourself. Then carry it with you everywhere you go. You can’t have your cake and eat it too. Unless you’re a thief. Which is what all this really comes down to.”

I don’t have the option of buying a copy in print. I live abroad, there are no stores for miles around that sell American comic books. I either have to pay exorbitant shipping costs for new comics or I have to wait until the TPBs are released and stocked in the Amazon Japan store. Calling anyone who wants to actually own the product they’ve paid full price for a thief is an extreme position.

“I don’t have the option of buying a copy in print. I live abroad, there are no stores for miles around that sell American comic books. I either have to pay exorbitant shipping costs for new comics or I have to wait until the TPBs are released and stocked in the Amazon Japan store. Calling anyone who wants to actually own the product they’ve paid full price for a thief is an extreme position.”

Um, when I said “thief”, I meant a thief. Like someone who downloads it without paying for it, or steals a copy off the shelf and shoves it in their pants. If you pay full price for it, how can you be a thief? Sorry you can’t get the American comics in print that you want in Japan. Sorry you can’t get digital downloads from comixology. Is your solution then to rip them off torrent sites?

Plain and simple the only reason I haven’t made the full jump to digital comics from print is because I don’t actually own anything for my money when I buy a digital comic. I own permission to view a file and that permission can be taken back by Comixology at any time.
Until they allow me to download an actual file that can be stored locally on my hard drive, so as to avoid debacles like this past weekend, I won’t support Comixology or their business model. And that’s a shame because I would LOVE to go 100 percent digital.

i read nearly all my digital off marvel unlimited. its servers arent connected to comixology. it’s nice having alternatives to comixology. and marvel unlimited advertises itself as a netflix like model. i’m under no pretension i’m buying a comic. just paying annual membership fee for access to a cloud.

comixology comics seem too high to pay. Even $1.99 for month old marvels and dc new titles seems pricey for a digital cloud comic. also power goes out in my area and i travel overseas often enough that i consider the cloud something that goes down whenever i need it the most.

“Um, when I said “thief”, I meant a thief. Like someone who downloads it without paying for it, or steals a copy off the shelf and shoves it in their pants. If you pay full price for it, how can you be a thief? Sorry you can’t get the American comics in print that you want in Japan. Sorry you can’t get digital downloads from comixology. Is your solution then to rip them off torrent sites?”

No, my idea of a solution is what was stated in the article and what I said in my comment: make it like mp3s and allow people to download the comics to their hard drives and their own libraries. I don’t pirate anything, I’ve just stopped reading comics. But until the publishers wise up and put a sensible system in place, they won’t get any money from me. And they certainly won’t stop piracy.

You got (some of) your facts wrong, they are true downloads and one can read them even while being offline, at least, when talking about comixology and Marvel for mobile devices (android and ios),. The apps have a size limit (it seems default is at 500mb) so when downloading new comics, the less read stuff will go missing, but there’s an option to set it to unlimited (but then it would depend on the capacity of the device)

The Marvel Digital Comics Unlimited, is cloud based with nothing downloaded (well, technically, everything has to be downloaded one way or the other, but the flash app prevents one from storing it or something), but that is a monthly fee rental thing, just like netflix..

Why would Comixology ever take back the permission to view a comic? Not a sound business model. They would hemorrhage customers and be finished. I’ve been digital for almost a year now. In that ENTIRE time, for a period of a day and a half I didn’t have access to comics that I didn’t have on my tablet. Big whoop. Unless the entire internet crashes, Comixology doesn’t need to change their model.

Torrenting for free is wrong wrong wrong wrong wrong. You deny the little guys pennies on the dollar, pennies that they need. That being said, it’s going to happen. As long as there is a way to cheat the system, it will be around. But making comics available digitally was the right solution and I don’t know why there is all the bellyaching about “owning” a digital file. How often are you at your computer and don’t have an internet connection? I would say, hardly ever. The way that Comixology puts together the comic, with the panel by panel view is most likely proprietary technology. I wouldn’t want any old joe schmoe to take it and begin selling it either.

And to those that think they should be cheaper, do you think that it’s any easier to put together a comic digitally than it is to ship it off to the printer? You have to pay the people who put the digital comic together, the people who run the servers, the distributors. It might be slightly less than print, but I want comic companies and the creators, from the writers to the letterers, to make a profit so they continue to put out a quality product.

I really don’t get the vitriol for a great product. The last straw for me was when Marvel downgraded their paper quality. Digitally, it still looks gorgeous. The model isn’t going anywhere.

There are some titles I follow digitally and others that demand print. And at first I was reluctant to buy anything off Comixology because I thought their prices were so high. But they do remove all the ads, so I guess it feels okay with the price tag.

Also, all the comics I had on my tablet were still there and still readable. Just the ones I was trying to download weren’t working.

Good thing I had bought Lil Gotham earlier that day.

“Why would Comixology ever take back the permission to view a comic? Not a sound business model. They would hemorrhage customers and be finished.”

One word: obsolescence. There are already other companies that have done just this. Who’s to say ComiXology won’t at some point in the future? And what if the problem is that ComiXology goes out of business? You would have lost all those comics because the company that granted you the license is now gone. If your local CBS goes out of business, you still have the comics you bought from them, they don’t disappear. The same can’t be said for ComiXology.

“Unless the entire internet crashes, Comixology doesn’t need to change their model.”

Because the entire Internet crashing is the only thing that would cause problems? ComiXology is completely immune to market forces? They will be around forever?

“But making comics available digitally was the right solution and I don’t know why there is all the bellyaching about “owning” a digital file.”

Because I’ve paid full price for it. And if something happens to ComiXology, I don’t want my money to have been wasted.

“How often are you at your computer and don’t have an internet connection? I would say, hardly ever.”

How often do you access the Internet while on a long flight? Or a long bus ride? Or a train? Lots of people use wifi tablets or laptops in places where they don’t have Internet access.

“The way that Comixology puts together the comic, with the panel by panel view is most likely proprietary technology. I wouldn’t want any old joe schmoe to take it and begin selling it either.”

Then to hell with the proprietary technology. I don’t care if I have to zoom in on individual panels.

“And to those that think they should be cheaper, do you think that it’s any easier to put together a comic digitally than it is to ship it off to the printer?”

The point is that if you’re going to charge the same price for two different versions of the product, except one product becomes your property and the other becomes what amounts to an undefined rental period, you are screwing your customer.

“It might be slightly less than print, but I want comic companies and the creators, from the writers to the letterers, to make a profit so they continue to put out a quality product.”

I do, too. And all I ask is that if I buy a product, I own that product. Otherwise, it’s greed and they won’t get a single cent from me. How’s that going to help the creators?

I have a growing collection of back issues in digital format via comixology. But it has always concerned me that at the end of the day imam at the mercy of someone else’s server instead of my own hard drive. Paying for leasing rights instead of ownership of a downloaded file. I think you hit it on the nose. We should be able to download purchased files just as we do with music files from iTunes.

Lazarus Pit Foreman

March 13, 2013 at 10:55 pm

I buy some digital, I buy some print. The reason I haven’t gone entirely digital is basically the price point — $3.99 for digital is a tough sell for me. If new releases were $1.99 I’d have no problem. I can live with the cloud system but would prefer an actual downloadable file that is restricted to x amount of devices/computers.

Saying all that though if they did drop new release prices on digital, I don’t think that’s fair to retailers.

This article has a lot of factual inaccuracies.

First the claim that you can’t truly download a comic, and that “the file is returned to the provider’s cloud storage after a short period of inactivity”. That is absolutely not true. The Comixology apps store a comic locally until you delete, and can keep storing comics until you completely fill your device’s storage memory with them (or until the app hits the limit you have set for it).

Second: “When I listen to music from my iTunes library, I’m not taxing Apple’s or Amazon’s servers”. You aren’t taxing any servers when you read a Comixology book either. Ironically, the Comixology app works exactly like iTunes. You can store as many comics as you can fit on your device, and read them whenever you want, regardless of a server or internet connection. Anything you can’t fit on your device can be left in the cloud–exactly how iTunes handles movies and music.

This is why during the server outage everyone could still read all the comics they had already downloaded.

I’m certainly not saying there aren’t DRM issues with digital comics (as are mentioned), but I feel like this article probably could use an update with how the Comixology app actually works, since it’s not just inaccurate, it’s flat wrong.

@Matt
It’s right about the situation on PCs/laptops.

@Percival Constantine
Well-said.

JRBirkhead said “And to those that think they should be cheaper, do you think that it’s any easier to put together a comic digitally than it is to ship it off to the printer? You have to pay the people who put the digital comic together, the people who run the servers, the distributors. It might be slightly less than print, but I want comic companies and the creators, from the writers to the letterers, to make a profit so they continue to put out a quality product.”

Are you new to comics or just a complete idiot? Every price increase for the past 30+ years has been blamed on the rising costs of printing and paper.

All this incident proved to me is that they need to upgrade their servers for higher capacity. I really don’t get a lot of what this article is talking about. As a few other people mentioned, I had access to anything that I had previously downloaded. I tend to download a lot and read a long run of a series all at once – kind of like getting a trade, but i get individual issues. I had no problems reading stuff over the weekend that I’d downloaded a long time ago. Also, when you purchase something it then downloads and tells you how big the file is. It certainly takes up memory on my device. I have a wifi-only iPad and don’t have a wifi connection at work. I still have no problems reading (on my break) what I have previously purchased. The only problem is connecting to get anything I don’t already have. When you delete an item, it lets you know that you did purchase it and can feel free to redownload it at anytime – so long as the servers are working.

I understand wanting to own a file of what you buy, but it seems like you do. You just have to use the comixology app to read it (as far as I know). And what’s the problem with that? You don’t buy a game on Playstation and try to play it on the XBox. You’d have to buy the XBox version of the same game.

i don’t know all the technical mumbo jumbo. I just know how it worked for me, which is contrary to what this article is saying.

I find it funny that people think physical books are somehow more permanent than digital copies.

It’s 2013. Barring the business itself shutting down, the Comixology servers going down permanently is no more likely than your house catching fire or getting hit by a tornado-destroying your print collection.

The servers being shut down permanently evokes some kind of apocalyptic scenario where electricity is a thing of the past. Honestly the last thing I would be worried about in said scenario is “how I am going to read Uncanny X-Men #271 now?!?”

You folks know that the pirates actually USE Comixiology and screen cap the comics to distribute them right? thats how they get the CMXHD files and release the HD versions. lol. All of you saying that leasing in any way helps is just igorance of what is actually going on.

@cich ComiXology has a Windows 8 app, which I assume works like the iOS and Android ones as far as being able to read purchased items without an Internet connection.

(But I don’t know for sure since I’m on a Mac and there isn’t one for that system. Even though the Mac App Store’s been around for a while.)

That’s very interesting Matt, I’ll definitely check it out when I’ll decide to upgrade to Win8.

I’m glad people were still able to read their purchased comics on Sunday when the servers had problems, but that wasn’t the experience I had. I hit the app shortly after the Marvel promotion started and was able to get six comics before it crashed. When it crashed, the app appeared to be hung up … I could see the last screen I was on but couldn’t go anywhere else. So I got out of it and tried to go back in, but the app kept crashing. Was it because of the server issues? I have no idea, because the app crashes enough in daily use that I kind of expect it now, but usually only when I’m reading a comic.

Eventually I was able to get back into the app, but the store screens would not load, nor would the screen that lists my comics. My comics came back after awhile and I made sure I could still read them … The ones that were still downloaded to my iPad were fine, while the ones that weren’t, obviously, I couldn’t get to. But yeah, there was a chunk of time when I couldn’t get to any of them.

I haven’t used comiXology’s website to access my comics before, but I did head over there on Sunday just to see if they had a statement up about what was going on. I couldn’t get it to load at all. Then I checked their Twitter feed, which told me to go listen to Enya to chill out. That’s not really a great response when your customers are frustrated. And sure, we are talking about comics here, which are entertainment and in the grand scheme of things it was a minor inconvenience, but any cloud service worth it’s weight should have a backup plan that minimizes downtime and can be implemented fairly quickly. That is poor planning on their part, but maybe this will lead to some internal policy changes that take care of that.

Comixology has been asked before about the ownership issue — if I bought a comic on your app, why can’t I download it to my computer or use a different reader to look at it? Have they ever given a decent answer to that question? Their terms of service pretty much say yeah, you are licensed to read it but you don’t own it, and even imply that if a publisher pulls the license from comixology you won’t have access to the book anymore. If I buy something, I don’t think it’s asking too much to be able to actually own it and do what I legally want to do with it … Like read it on my computer when my Internet is down or your servers are down. Their tagline is buy once, read anywhere, but that wasn’t the case on Sunday for a lot of their customers.

I think a perfect example of the possibilty of comixology going bust or closing down and customers being no longer able to access what they “bought” has just occurred with JManga shutting up shop. They offered a similar service but for manga rather than comics and they just announced they will be winding up later in the year. http://robot6.comicbookresources.com/2013/03/jmanga-digital-service-to-shut-down-may-30/

Somewhere along the way, I became a reader of comic books, not a collector. I rarely keep comics I’ve already read, even in print. So not having a file I can store on a drive other than my ipad isn’t something I need. So comixology works just fine for me.

If I’m going to be on a long flight or staying out of town where a wi-fi connection might not be guaranteed, and I want digital comics, I just download them beforehand. It’s easy.

Yes to this article. Yes, some of the details may be misleading, but the gist of it is accurate. The current model has no provisions for off-line storage of your books other than what’s already downloaded on a particular device. The current model has all of your purchases accessible through Comixology. If their servers crash, if your internet goes down, if they decide to revoke permission, if a publisher decides to revoke permission(?), if they go out of business, your purchases are gone. Some might remain on your device, provided you never upgrade your device, but otherwise there’s no back-up. In print I have many comics from publishers who now don’t exist. Those comics are 20+ years old. If I buy something today on Comixology, I will be surprised if I still have access to it 20 years down the road. My music collection, on the other hand, even though it’s also largely digital, is easily backed up and transferred to other devices. I don’t expect to lose that.

When I first got a tablet, I was ready to jump into digital comics, having given up my weekly trips to the local shop years ago. When I saw the business model, I balked. Four dollars to rent a digital issue for an unspecified amount of time is not a good deal. Still, when prices drop to 99 cents, my resolve weakens. That’s enough of a discount to make up for the shortcomings of this model. At least it has been so far. But then my buying habits change from Buy an issue, Download an issue, Read an issue, Buy the next… to Buy a bunch of issues and leave them in the cloud until I’m ready to immerse myself in that title. That works great until I finish the half of the series that I downloaded and find that I can’t download the rest for 2 days because the servers are down. It’s a reminder that I didn’t get ownership of anything. I got permission to read something, and I really only got permission to read it right at the point when I bought it. Permission can be revoked at any time, and I have no recourse. The model has a clear down side, but we don’t usually get to see it. The ease of use and lack of problems helps us forget, but a meltdown like this weekend’s reminds us that we’re pouring money into a company that provides no product nor guarantees. Even holding out for 99 cent sales, I’ve given them a fair amount of money and haven’t yet read all that I’ve paid for, so this weekend was definitely a reminder of the potential consumer-unfriendliness of this model.

I think comiXology should make a PDF version of our purchases available for download, if we want to download them. Seems like it’s an issue for some and not others. The PDFs can be just plain old art and words, no guided view necessary.

Personally, I refuse to “buy” digital copies I don’t own. When Marvel announced Marvel Unlimited, I immediately bought all the DVDs of PDF Marvel comics I could find that were available from the then-licensee (can’t remember their name anymore – I found all but 1). Consequently, for a few $100, I actually own 1000s of Marvel comics in digital format – yes, there are definitely others I’d like but I’m not leasing them.

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