Robot 6

Jesse Moynihan and Luke Pearson lead Nobrow’s 2014 lineup

FormingII

U.K. publisher Nobrow has been making serous inroads in North America, thanks largely to a colorful, lively and diverse lineup of titles that appeal to a variety of ages while showcasing the strengths of the comics medium.

The new year might possibly be the company’s breakthrough into the American market, as it’s not only making a push with a new U.S. office, but also has a lineup of intriguing comics planned. Readers can expect to see a new book in the increasingly popular Hilda series from Luke Pearson, the second volume in Jesse Moynihan’s ongoing Forming storyline, an all-ages account of Shackleton’s journey to Antarctica, a comic about neuroscience and more.

Check out details about Nobrow’s upcoming releases, as well as some swell cover art, below.

WorseThingsHapenAtSea

Kellie Strøm flexes his drawing muscles and comes up with a monster of a concertina book. Inspired by stories of mythical sea creatures and the tall tales of doomed voyages passed down from sailor to son, Strom brings us a rich tapestry of wonderment. Historical ships are attacked, enveloped and engorged by monstrous creatures surfacing from the deepest depths of the darkest oceans. Covering 20 unparalled panels of crosshatching, each measuring 13.8 cm by 23.5 cm, the image unfolds in front of you like a foreboding fable from the cracked lips of an old sea captain.

Apart from the fantastical beasts Strom shows us some of the most beautiful vessels to ever grace the seven seas, Greek galleys, Arab dhows, Chinese junks and Portuguese sailing ships to mention only a few.

FormingII

Forming II by Jesse Moynihan

Civilization, but not quite as we know it, has started to take shape. And now, in the continuing chaos, the world and most of its inhabitants have brandished their swords and, in various fashions, charged onto the battlefield.

If Forming I hailed the birth of a civilization and mapped out the genesis of life, mass, time and space, then Forming II is the raging war that ensues in the universe’s years of belligerent adolescence. Epic confrontations between gods and mutants, philosophical reflections, hilarious dialogue and powerful artwork make for an impressive sequel of galactic proportions. Forming II is as funny, sophisticated and mind-glowingly beautiful as the first part of Moynihan’s unique trilogy.

Neurocomic

Neurocomic by Hana Ros and Matteo Farinella

A genre-splicing collaboration between a neuroscientist and a comics artist (who also happens to study neuroscience) about the way our brains work. Neurocomic is a visually captivating adventure through the brain, populated by quirky creatures, bizarre landscapes and famous neuroscientists. Our nameless protagonist evades vindictive colossal squid, negotiates mysterious trap doors, battles Boschean narcotic demons and navigates forest of neurons to take you on a rapturous journey through the most complex organic structure in the universe. With shout-outs to Scott McCloud and fisticuffs included at no extra cost.

ShackletonsJourney_cover

Shackleton’s Journey by William Grill

First time author William Grill’s impeccably researched take on Ernest Shackleton’s legendary story of survival by way of teamwork, leadership and toughness hits the page in colored pencil. Looking like nothing else, Grill’s vibrant colors and cheerful illustration are a brilliant juxtaposition to the awesomeness of Shackleton’s achievement, and a joyous reminder that determination and will doesn’t have to look like anger.

HildaBlackHound

Hilda and the Black Hound by Luke Pearson

In Hilda’s new adventure (which will debut at TCAF in 2014!), she meets the Nisse: a mischievous but charismatic bunch of misfits who occupy a world beside — but also somehow within—our own, where the rules of physics don’t quite match up. Meanwhile, on the streets of Trolberg,a dark specter looms …

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Comments

2 Comments

A new Hilda book! HURRAH!

I need to get my hands on new Hilda and Forming. It is important.

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