Robot 6

Comics A.M. | Two Japanese men arrested for uploading manga

Gin Tama

Gin Tama

Legal | The Hiroshima, Japan, police arrested a 36-year-old man on Monday for illegally uploading the manga series Gin Tama to the Internet; he was charged with copyright infringement. This comes just a few days after the arrest of another unemployed man for uploading a volume of Berserk. In both cases, the publisher and the creator of the manga involved have sued the suspects. [Crunchyroll]

Creators | Batman writer Scott Snyder talks about the women of Gotham City. [Comicosity]

Creators | In the first part of a two-part interview conducted at WonderCon, writer Kelly Sue DeConnick discusses how she grew up reading comics in the 1970s, her work for Tokyopop and Marvel, and what Carol Danvers means to her fans. [Toucan]

Furious #1

Furious #1

Creators | Bill Baker talks to Victor Santos (Mice Templar, Polar) about his first superhero comic, Furious. [Comics Creator News]

Creators | Wexford, Ireland, artist Nick Roche is particularly happy to be drawing the Marvel comic Deaths Head, as it was a favorite of his growing up. [The Independent]

Comics | Emily Hoosier pops in during Ladies Night at a Washington, D.C., comics shop and finds an avid group of female fans, many of whom first found each other on Tumblr. [The Washington Times]

Awards | Rodrigo de Matos, a Portuguese editorial cartoonist who lives in Macau, has won the Press Cartoon Europe Grand Prix for a cartoon of a poor man being handed a soccer ball instead of soup, which appeared in a Portuguese newspaper. [The Macau Daily Times]

Conventions | A teenager who was bullied in middle school but found inspiration in Peter Parker now organizes mini-comics conventions for local teens. [The Tampa Tribune]

Retailing | John Hill, owner of the newly opened Hills of Comics Auburn, Washington, started reading comics as a child when he was diagnosed with dyslexia, and his mother was told to encourage him to read anything—anything at all: “The school told her to get me reading, saying, ‘If he wants Playboy at 8 years old and he’ll read it, get it.’ I chose not to read Playboy, though, I chose to go with comic books.” He started dealing comics at age 13, and when the opportunity came up, 30 years later, to open his own store, he grabbed it. [The Auburn Reporter]

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Comments

One Comment

“The school told her to get me reading, saying, ‘If he wants Playboy at 8 years old and he’ll read it, get it.’

Now that’s MY kinda school!

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