Current Transmissions

Nothing says ‘meditative’ like a Zen Judge Dredd statue

zen-dredd-cropped

Although I have my doubts as to the calming, meditative qualities of a character whose signature line is “Hulk SMASH,” I’m not immune to the appeal of these 3D-printed Buddha sculptures of an assortment of pop-culture characters, from the Star Wars cast to Batman to Judge Dredd to Groot (with Rocket Raccoon, naturally).

The statues, which come in three sizes — 2 inches, 4 inches and 6 inches — range in price from $7.99 to $27.99. You can see some of the pieces below, and the full selection on Chris Milnes’ Etsy page.

Continue Reading »

Suspect in plane bomb hoaxes used webcomic for Twitter handle

Zortic last panel

Being a webcomics creator has its challenges, but here’s one you don’t see too often: finding out the title of your long-running strip is being used by someone who tweeting bomb threats to airlines. That’s the surreal situation Mark Mekkes found himself in on Saturday.

Mekkes is the creator of the long-running Zortic, which he describes as “a weekly science fiction, comedy adventure comic with a lot of parody and popular references.” The comic has been running for 14 years, but on Saturday, Mekkes noticed a spike in traffic and social media mentions. He didn’t think too much of it until he got a phone call from his brother-in-law, who had seen “Zortic” mentioned on the national news. The reason: Somebody using the Twitter handle “King Zortic” had tweeted bomb threats to Delta and Southwest airlines, resulting in two planes being escorted by fighter jets to Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta and then scoured by bomb squads. The threats were ultimately determined to be a hoax.

Continue Reading »

Celebrate Chris Evans-Chris Pratt Super Bowl bet with charity tee

teefury-chris v chris

The good-natured Super Bowl rivalry between Captain America star Chris Evans and Guardians of the Galaxy star Chris Pratt has moved beyond a charity bet to inspire a charity T-shirt.

As CBR noted last week, Boston native Evans and Seattle resident Pratt dug in for their own Civil War:  If New England wins Super Bowl XLIX, Pratt will don a Patriots jersey and make an appearance at Christopher’s Haven in Boston, which provides a home away from home for young cancer patients and their families while they undergo cancer treatments at nearby hospitals. but if the Seahawks win, Evans will dress as Captain America and visit Seattle Children’s Hospital while carrying a 12th Man flag.

Continue Reading »

In ‘Avengers 2: Step Up,’ reluctant heroes were born to dance

avengers2-step-up

In an alternate, sunnier reality, the sequel to Marvel’s Avengers wouldn’t be about Tony Stark unintentionally unleashing a homicidal robot bent on eradicating humanity. Instead, it would center on one flexible man with a plan: to forge a group of heroes with broken dreams into … Earth’s Mightiest Dance Team.

Hey, it could work, as PistolShrimps demonstrates in the parody video Avengers 2: Step Up, which has a little fun with footage from the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Continue Reading »

Robot Reviews | ‘March,’ Book Two

march_book_two_72dpi_lgThe second volume of Rep. John Lewis’ autobiographical trilogy March is darker than the first one, both literally — artist Nate Powell fills many panels with almost unbroken blackness, as he depicts smoke, night and noxious fumes — and figuratively, as it shows human cruelty at its worst. Even in its lighter moments, Book Two shows the flaws as well as the triumphs of the Civil Rights movement. As this era recedes from living memory to history books, it’s in danger of dwindling to a series of inspirational images and iconic figures. Book Two of March is a bracing antidote to that.

March‘s first volume focused on Lewis’ youth and his involvement with the Nashville lunch counter sit-ins of 1959-1960, his first experience with nonviolent social action. In Nashville, the protestors were mostly students, their leaders were mostly religious, and they took the principle of nonviolence seriously. The refusal to answer violence with violence, whether verbal or physical, was integral to their actions. While there are violent moments in Book One, the story doesn’t dwell on them.

In Book Two, on the other hand, Lewis jumps right in with an attempted murder: The manager of a diner not only refuses to serve Lewis and a colleague, he sends his staff away, turns off the lights, turns on a fumigator spraying insecticide gas, and locks the door. The opposition has moved from harassment to deadly force, and while Lewis was rescued by firefighters (who must have been called by someone), it’s clear from the start that the stakes have been raised.

Continue Reading »

Excelsior? Stan Lee thinks the world will probably blow itself up

stan-lee-steve-aoki

With collaborators like Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, Stan Lee dreamed up futuristic technology and alien civilizations, but he still marvels at the advancements he witnesses in our world.

I always knew new inventions and new things would come along,” he tells music producer Steve Aoki the latest edition of Wired’s “Neon Future Sessions.’ “I didn’t think it would happen so fast. I didn’t think in my lifetime we’d have things like navigators in automobiles, that we’d have smartphones that can talk to you, but, boy, science is moving so fast. They’re actually managing to keep up with me.”

Continue Reading »

‘Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service’ gets omnibus treatment

kurosagi

Dark Horse is expanding its omnibus line with oversized new collections of The Kurosagi Corpse Delivery Service.

Created by Eiji Ōtsuka and Housui Yamazaki, the frequently gory horror manga centers on five young graduates of a Buddhist college, each with a special skill — dowsing, embalming, channeling an alien intelligence, etc. — who form a company devoted to delivering the dead to where they need to go to move on to their next reincarnations. It’s not pleasant or easy work, and it doesn’t always pay, but it beats a 9-to-5 job.

Continue Reading »

Wizard World adds Fan Fest Chicago for March

fan fest chicagoJust a week after announcing the acquisition of Pittsburgh Comicon, Wizard World Inc. has added another event to its rapidly expanding roster — the awkwardly named Wizard World Comic Con Presents Fan Fest Chicago.

Set for March 7-8 at the Donald E. Stephens Convention Center in Rosemont, Illinois (longtime location of Wizard World Chicago), Fan Fest Chicago is billed as “a ‘thank you’ to loyal Wizard World fans.”

The admission price for Fan Fest Chicago will be considerably less expensive than most Wizard World conventions, at $25 for the weekend or $15 for either day. Additionally, those who have purchased VIP or four-day passes to the Aug. 20-23 Wizard World Chicago will be admitted for free to Fan Fest.

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Heavy Metal to base its comics line in Portland

Hoax Hunters

Hoax Hunters

Publishing | Portland, Oregon, will be the home base for Heavy Metal’s new line of comics, which was announced in October, following the company’s sale to David Boxenbaum and Jeff Krelitz. “I think it’s being closer to the talent,” Krelitz said. “If you wanted to be a painter in the early 20th century, you went to Paris. The comics line launches in March with the second season of Michael Moreci and Steve Seely’s Hoax Hunters. The company plans to be publishing eight original series by the end of this year and another 12 next year, building up to 50 in five years. “We’re positioning to be a premier publisher,” Krelitz said. [The Oregonian]

Passings | Editorial cartoonist R.K. Laxman, who maintained a running commentary on Indian politics for almost 60 years, has died at age 93. The younger brother of novelist R. K. Narayan, Laxman got his start illustrating his brother’s work as well as doing drawings for local newspapers. He became an editorial cartoonist for the Times of India around 1947, about the time India became an independent country, and stayed there until 2010. Laxman’s most famous creation was the Common Man, a character that stood in for the average Indian. As the official obituary in the Times of India said, “His Common Man, created in 1957, was the symbol of India’s ordinary people, their trials and tribulations, their little joys and sorrows, and the mess they found themselves in thanks to the political class and bureaucracy. But despite the sobering reality of this, there was never any rancour in Laxman’s cartoons. His humour was always delightful, and no one could hold a candle to his brushstrokes.” [Times of India]

Continue Reading »

Designer mixes classic game characters and NBA teams

phoenix-pikachus

Combining two loves — professional basketball and video games — graphic designer Mark Avery-Kenny has created a series of logos that mash together classic characters like Pac-Man, Pikachu and Mario with NBA franchises.

While some of the combinations make perfect sense — King Hippo and the Sacramento Kings, for instance — others aren’t nearly as logical. But they’re all fun and well-executed. Check out just some of them below, and the rest on Avery-Kenny’s Instagram page.

Continue Reading »

Anti-Islam bus ads defaced with images of Ms. Marvel

Via Street Cred - Advertising For the People

Via Street Cred – Advertising For the People

Controversial ads on the sides of San Francisco buses that equate Islam with Nazism have been defaced with images of Marvel’s Kamala Khan, accompanied by slogans like “Stamp Out Racism.”

According to SFGate, these banners — only the latest purchased by blogger Pamela Geller’s American Freedom Defense Initiative — went up on buses on Jan. 9, and feature an image of Adolf Hitler and Palestinian Muslim leader Haj Amin al-Husseini, who opposed Zionism. With the headline, “Islamic Jew-Hatred: It’s In The Quran,” the ads encouraged an end to aid to all Islamic countries.

Continue Reading »

Stan Lee was the first to upload video to LiveJournal

stan lee-livejournal

The nearly 16-year-old LiveJournal last week finally introduced video hosting, and 92-year-old Stan Lee was the first to give it a whirl.

The legendary writer partnered with the social media platform in November to not only launch a blog but to also kick off a contest to find his biggest fan. So of course his video was a reminder to submit entries by the Friday deadline.

Continue Reading »

DC solicits ‘Legends of the Dark Knight: Norm Breyfogle’

batman465Amid efforts by relatives and colleagues to raise money for veteran Batman artist Norm Breyfogle‘s medical care, DC Comics appears to have rushed solicitation of Legends of the Dark Knight: Norm Breyfogle, Vol. 1.

The 54-year-old artist was hospitalized in mid-December following a stroke that paralyzed his left side, including his drawing hand. Breyfogle has no health insurance, and his savings was eaten away by the hospital stay, leading his brother and sister-in-law to launch an online fundraising campaign to help pay for months of care and physical therapy.

To date, the effort has generated nearly $86,000 of its $200,000 goal.

Related: On Norm Breyfogle: What Would Batman Do?

DC Comics had no comment about the collection or its timing, but the blog Collected Editions notes it hadn’t part of the publisher’s 2015 releases.

No details are known beyond the Amazon listing, which specifies a 520-page hardcover, set for release on July 7 for $34.35.

A fixture of DC from 1987 to 1995, collaborating with writer Alan Grant on Detective Comics, Batman and Shadow of the Bat. The folks at Collected Editions speculate what storylines might be included in the hardcover.

Viz Media brings back ‘The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past’

legend of zeldaViz Media is bringing Shotaro Ishinomori’s manga The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past back to print for the first time in 20 years.

Arriving in May from the publisher’s Perfect Square imprint, the full-color edition will collect the loose adaptation of the original game’s story, which was originally serialized in 1992 in Game Power magazine. The story was re-released as a trade paperback the following year.

The story by Ishinomori, creator of Cyborg 009, Kamen Rider and Hotel, followed the overall story arc of the game, but included new plot twists and characters, including Link’s fairy guide Epheremelda and a descendent of the Knights of Hyrule named Roam.

“Many older fans recall eagerly awaiting each new issue of Nintendo Power magazine back in the ‘90s for a new monthly chapter of A Link to the Past,” Beth Kawasaki, Perfect Square’s senior editorial director, said in a statement. “While it followed the overall story arc of the original Super Entertainment System game, creator Ishinomori also added new plot twists and characters that made this a stand-alone favorite among multiple generations of fans.”

‘Leaving Megalopolis’ was bestselling comiXology Submit title of 2014

leaving-megalopolisComiXology has announced the 25 bestselling comiXology Submit titles of 2014.

Launched in 2013, the self-publishing portal allows independent creators to upload their comics and graphic novels for sale worldwide, with profits split evenly between comiXology and the creator.

Although comiXology doesn’t provide any details about number of downloads, the list still makes for interesting reading, as it’s a mix of titles you might expect — Leaving Megalopolis by Gail Simone and Jim Calafiore, Testament by Douglas Rushkoff & Co. — and some that don’t have that level of creator name recognition, like Benjamin Rivers’ Snow and Beto Skubs and Rafael de Latorre’s Fade Out: Painless Suicide.

While Leaving Megalopolis and Testament: Omnibus top the chart, Joe Benitez’s Lady Mechanika claims three spots. It’s also an incredibly diverse list, where the mystery Watson and Holmes is found alongside the “world’s sexiest anthology” Smut Peddler, and the gay superhero title The Pride is nestled between the Western Moth City Preludes: The Reservoir and the pirate adventure Annie Bonnie.

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives