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Moebius and more populate this week’s Shelf Porn

01 pano porn

Happy Saturday and welcome to Shelf Porn, where each week we feature one fan’s collection. Today’s shelves come from Austin Tinius, comics creator and publisher at Bogus Publishing.

If you’d like to see your collection right here on Robot 6, you can find complete details at the end of this post.

And now let’s hear from Austin …

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Small Press Expo 2014 from two perspectives

The SPX room before the show started.

The SPX room before the show started.

As is usually the case, the 2014 Small Press Expo was a whirlwind affair, full of panels, hurried greetings, bumping into people while walking along the aisles and comics, comics, comics everywhere you looked.

Both Brigid Alverson and I were there, although we never actually managed to meet up (while SPX isn’t a large show by national standards, it’s still easy to miss people). Rather than write separate stories, we thought it might be fun to post a back-and-forth dialogue, similar to our MoCCA report from a few years back. Be sure also to check out Brigid’s great photos from the Ignatz Awards if you haven’t already done so.

Chris Mautner: How many times have you been to SPX before this, Brigid? What’s your previous experience with this particular convention been like?

Brigid Alverson: This was actually my first SPX, which surprised a lot of people — clearly this is a show that you come back to over and over. I have been going to MoCCA and TCAF for the past couple of years, so I’m familiar with a lot of the artists and the work. I felt there was more commingling at SPX, partly because everyone is staying in the same hotel where the show is, and also because the organizers made the effort — there was a meet-’n'-greet for exhibitors and press the evening before the show, and the Ignatz Awards/mock wedding on Saturday. Maybe because of that, I really got a sense of community from this show.

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Brian Bendis shuts down his long-running message board

Marvel mainstay and Powers co-creator Brian Michael Bendis has shut down his long-running message board, effective immediately. Previous posts are no longer accessible and all incoming links to the board direct to a note from the Eisner-winning writer, where he states his reason for the closure and invites fans to interact with him via his Twitter and Tumblr accounts.

“This looks to be one of the most exciting years I will ever have with the debut of the Powers TV show and so many other big surprises coming in the next few months,” Bendis wrote. “It is important, now more than ever, that I focus as much of my attention on my work and family.”

The Bendis Board, as it was.

The Bendis Board, as it was.

The Bendis Board took many forms at multiple different homes across the Internet over the years, dating back to the writer’s pre-Marvel days. In addition to his own board, Bendis hosted forums for other creators (collectively known as the “Jinxworld Forums”), which are also now redirecting to the closure message.

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‘Spawn’ fan film may make you forget that other Spawn movie

spawn-fan-film

Todd McFarlane has long talked about “complete reboot” of the 1997 film Spawn, envisioning a low-budget supernatural thriller that has more in common with The Conjuring than with current superhero blockbusters. For inspiration, he may need look no further that director Michael Paris’ fan short Spawn: The Recall.

The bulk of the nearly eight-minute film was shot in a day and two nights in a supermarket after business hours, using a limited cast and crew (post-production took two years, with the visual effects rendered on a single computer).

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The ironic awfulness off ‘Sweet Bro and Hella Jeff’

Screen Shot 2014-09-16 at 12.15.12 AMNot too long ago, I became aware of something called “seapunk.” After steampunk and deiselpunk, I had initially thought this was another strange technology-based trend based on the legitimate “cyberpunk” where geeks were far more interested in the aesthetic qualities rather than anything making sense. As it turns out, “seapunk” is far less serious.

Unlike the other variations, seapunk leans far more heavily on the “punk” part. There’s a ton of bright colors — teals, purples and greens — plus mermaids, dolphins and other aquatic life.

There’s also the inherent silliness, which includes ’90s nostalgia. Search “seapunk” on Tumblr (the alleged breeding ground for this microculture) and you run into the sorts of jerky animated GIFs and visual callbacks to Windows 95. While it may not necessarily be aesthetically pleasing, its off-putting, incongruous visuals are part of the charm.

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Terry Gilliam explains the Church of Batman the Redeemer

batman-the-redeemer

Sometime in the near future — although, alas, not the one depicted in DC Comics’ Futures End — people will worship at the altar of the Dark Knight. At least that we’re told by Terry Gilliam’s new film The Zero Theorem, in which we glimpse an enormous ad that declares “The Church of Batman the Redeemer Needs YOU.”

With its U.S. release today in select theaters and on VOD, the director has of course been making the press rounds, discussing a cinematic world overtaken by technology, and precisely why people would follow the Caped Crusader.

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‘The XII’ takes us into familiar wastelands

The XII TemplateThere’s a theory that the American obsession with the apocalypse stems from Manifest Destiny: As settlers pushed west, they encountered things that would strain the threads tying them to civilization. Storms rolling across the flat plains could be seen from man miles away, and they posed a considerable threat to the livelihoods of entire communities. During the pitch-black night, there would be ominous noises — frightening howls, thunderclaps, maybe even the unexpected sound of a human voice.

There would be precious few things you can do in a world where law is stretched thin, except keep a well-stocked cellar and a loaded shotgun.

That may explain why a lot of North American post-apocalyptic fiction tends to look like the Wild West. While we may think we’re too cool for cowboys and Indians, it may have just morphed to satisfy the primal survival instincts of modern thrill-seekers. After all, aren’t armored, nomadic warlords just bandits and desperadoes with a shiny new coat of paint? It’s probably no accident that The Walking Dead‘s Rick Grimes dressed a lot like a frontier sheriff, or why the women in Katniss Everdeen’s district look as if they stepped out of a little house on the prairie.

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Petition calls for life-size statue of Wolverine in Edmonton

death of wolverineOnline petitions are typically met with an eye roll, but it’s difficult not to like this one: Two residents of Edmonton, Alberta, want the city to erect a life-size statue in honor of one of the provinces native sons … James “Logan” Howlett. Yes, Wolverine.

“Not many popular or exciting fictional characters are born Canadian, but superhero and adventurer Wolverine isn’t just Canadian, he’s an Albertan too,” Jesse Seitz writes on Change.org. “I think it would make a lot of people really proud to live in Edmonton and raise morale to erect a life size statue of this character in City Hall, or even perhaps Churchill Square or the Alberta Legislature Grounds.”

His friend Christopher Olivier adds, “Wolverine has been a staple of Marvel Comics for the last 40 years, the X-Men film franchise for 15 and is now considered as popular as The Avengers and Spider-Man. We believe a statue of the X-Man will only draw more people to the city if not just to see it and would make fans of the character beam with pride.”

If Metropolis, Illinois, can have a 15-foot-tall statue of Superman, then why shouldn’t Edmonton have (a decidedly shorter) one of Wolverine? And what better way to memorialize the character’s impending death?

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Long Beach Comic Con announces Dwayne McDuffie Award

Dwayne McDuffie

Dwayne McDuffie

Long Beach Comic Con organizers have announced the Dwayne McDuffie Award, named in honor of the influential comics and animation writer who passed away in 2011. Details will be revealed Sept. 27 at the convention.

“Dwayne’s influence on comics is incredible, and we look forward to helping preserve his legacy through this award,” convention co-founder Martha Donato said in a statement.

Donato will be joined for the official announcement by fellow co-founder Phil Lawrence, and Neo Edmund, Joan Hilty, Joseph Illidge, Heidi MacDonald, Glen Murakami, Eugene Son, William J. Watkins, Len Wein, Charlotte Fullerton McDuffie and Matt Wayne.

Co-founder of the pioneering Milestone Media, McDuffie’s comics work ranged from Marvel’s Damage Control and Fantastic Four to Milestone’s Static and Icon to DC’s Justice League of America and Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight.

His animation credits include Static Shock, Justice League, Justice League: Crisis on Two Earths, All-Star Superman and Justice League: Doom.

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There’s a new world record for largest gathering of Batmen

Photo courtesy of Nexen

Photo courtesy of Nexen

While the rest of us were busy Thursday with humdrum activities like work, classes and household chores, 542 employees of Nexen Energy were being awesome by gathering outside the company’s Calgary headquarters to set a Guinness World Record for the Largest Gathering of People Dressed as Batman.

The previous record was a paltry 250. It marks the second time Nexen employees have set a world record: In 2011, 437 of them came together to establish the Largest Gathering of People Dressed as Superman.

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Comics A.M. | Roz Chast discusses her National Book Award nod

Roz Chast

Roz Chast

Creators | Cartoonist Roz Chast talks about her memoir Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? landing on the 2014 longlist for 2014 National Book Award. It’s the first time a graphic novel has been nominated in that category, and Chast is the only woman on this year’s list. When The Wall Street Journal noted that, between this nomination and Alison Bechdel’s MacArthur “genius grant,” “it’s a good day to be a female cartoonist,” Chast replied, “I totally agree. Actually my first thought was just it’s good for cartoons, for the graphic form.” [Speakeasy]

Creators | Alex de Campi talks about her pioneering digital comic Valentine, widely regarded as the first long-form comic to make extensive use of digital techniques. She doesn’t think the medium has come too far since then: “We’re all still in the shallow end, congratulating each other for getting our feet wet. There’s been no significant innovation since us. The DC and Marvel stuff is still based on half-page increments so it can go to print. The Madefire stuff I have seen (not a lot, maybe it’s gotten better) is just embarrassing motion comics. It pisses me off because there is so much more to be done. And I want to do it. But it would take an investor, or a very daring multi-media entertainment company. And big entertainment companies are many things, but daring is not one of them.” [Digital Spy]

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Grumpy Old Fan | DC’s December: happy golden days of yore

...'Miss Gordon' if you're nasty

‘Miss Gordon’ if you’re nasty

There’s a lot to like in DC Comics’ December solicitations, most of it due to the return of some old friends and the uber-nostalgic glimpses at a traditional status quo. It’s not like the New 52′s changes are being rolled back — I have no illusions about that, and I’m not sure how it would work if it did happen — but DC is always best served when it can channel the familiar aspects of its past in vibrant new forms.

THERE YOU GO AGAIN

I am starting to think Secret Six is the comic Gail Simone was born to write, even more so than Birds of Prey. There’s always been a dark undercurrent running through her DC work, from BOP to Batgirl to The Movement, but only with the Sixers could she really cut loose. Indeed, as much as I enjoyed Scandal, Bane, Deadshot and the rest, I’m eager to see what she can do with six cryptically united strangers, most of whom will probably be new to us.

Those who believe the traditional, pre-New 52 DC Universe is still out there, somewhere in the Multiverse, can reasonably hang their collective hat on the return of the Keith Giffen/J.M. DeMatteis Blue Beetle and Booster Gold in Justice League 3000 #12. I’d go even further, and say this version of Beetle and Booster probably follows directly from the two “Super Buddies” arcs that Giffen, DeMatteis and Kevin Maguire produced in the mid-2000s. The second one, I Can’t Believe It’s Not the Justice League, ended rather pointedly with Beetle and Max Lord sharing a happy moment. That, of course, stood in stark contrast to the Countdown to Infinite Crisis special, in which Max shot Beetle in the head, and then (a few months later) successfully dared Wonder Woman to execute him. Therefore, the Beetle and Booster of JL3K hail from an Earth where things turned out quite differently — but ironically, they’ve been awakened in a dystopian future where the Justice Leaguers are darkly twisted versions of their old selves. Not that Giffen and DeMatteis can’t find some comedy there, but I’m having trouble summoning up a bwah-hah-hah.

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DC favorites make headlines in ‘Saturday Evening Post’ tributes

saturday-evening-zatanna-cr

Artist Juan Carlos Ruiz Burgos recently added the above Zatanna illustration to his deviantART gallery, drawing our attention to his occasional series of frankly amazing tributes to the classic Saturday Evening Post covers using DC Comics characters.

In addition to Zatanna, surrounded on stage by white rabbits, there’s a heartwarming depiction of Clark Kent casually reading The Daily Planet as a little boy gapes in awe at Action Comics #1, The Joker and Harley Quinn on the run like Bonnie and Clyde, Wonder Woman listening thoughtfully to a little girl, and an autumnal Poison Ivy piece that’s probably not safe for work.

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Tempers flare at school board meeting in fight about ‘Persepolis’

persepolisA school board meeting in Murphy, Oregon, turned heated Tuesday when a board member went head to head with parents about Marjane Satrapi’s graphic memoir Persepolis.

According to the Medford Mail Tribune, the parents object to the availability of the graphic novel in the Three Rivers School District’s high school libraries. Some contend teenagers shouldn’t have access to the book without parental approval.

Depicting Satrapi’s experience as a child and young adult in Iran during the Islamic revolution, Persepolis has received almost universal acclaim. The 2007 animated adaptation directed by Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud was nominated for an Academy Award. The graphic novel was at the center of a controversy in March 2013, when Chicago Public Schools ordered its removal, sparking protests from parents, teachers and student. That order was quickly rescinded, but CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett asked that Persepolis no longer be taught to seventh-graders, as it may not be appropriate for that age group.

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Dark Horse PR director Jeremy Atkins exits after 10 years

jeremy-atkins-badges

Jeremy Atkins, Dark Horse’s director of public relations, announced today that after a decade with the publisher, he’s accepted a job with Portland, Oregon-based brewery Rogue Ales.

“After ten years at Dark Horse Comics, where I have learned so much, made lifelong friends and been lucky enough to see the world preaching the four color gospel, I am moving on to the craft brewing industry,” he wrote on Facebook. “After this weekend’s Rose City Comic Con, I will join the marketing team at Rogue Ales! Their legendary Dead Guy Ale was one of the first to awaken my tastebuds to the glory of PacNW brews, and remains a favorite to this day. I am sad to say goodbye to my friends and family in comics, but excited for a new adventure and the chance to get back to writing. Look for Alex Cox and I’s comics creation to make it’s online debut in the coming months, and hopefully more to follow.”

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