Brigid Alverson, Author at Robot 6 | The Comics Culture Blog | Page 3 of 168

Angouleme: The Obstacle Race continues

"The Obstacle Race," by Germaine Greer

“The Obstacle Race,” by Germaine Greer

I was an art student in 1979 when Germaine Greer’s The Obstacle Race was published. As it happened, most of the art majors that year were women, and we all read the book and spent late nights in our studios discussing it. Women had been completely absent from our art history courses, and Greer’s book opened our eyes to that fact and the reasons behind it — not a lack of talent, but a lack of recognition and encouragement — and often the deliberate placement of obstacles.

That wasn’t difficult to believe. The university I attended had only admitted women for five years and limited them to 25 percent of the student body at the time.

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Comics A.M. | The convention market ‘is starting to saturate’

New York Comic Con 2015

New York Comic Con 2015

Conventions | ReedPOP Senior Vice President Lance Fensterman looks back at New York Comic Con 2015, which drew 167,000 people over four days; the increase came from making Thursday a full day, he says. Fensterman also offers some thoughts on conventions in general, saying the market is starting to become saturated, but not in terms of fans, who will always go to a cool show: “I think the saturation is more so on the side of content, and by content, I mean exhibitors, brands, guests, studios,” he says. “They don’t need that many shows.” Dealers will always show up, but, Fensterman says, “Fans don’t want to pay a ticket price to come in to spend money. There needs to be content that is engaging, exciting and unique. And there’s a limited quantity on that.” [ICv2]

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Under fire, Angouleme will leave Grand Prix to the ‘free will’ of voters

Sarah McIntyre's cartoon commentary on Angouleme

Sarah McIntyre‘s cartoon commentary on Angouleme

Angouleme International Comics Festival this morning responded to mounting backlash to its men-only pool of nominees for the Grand Prix with a revised shortlist that included six women creators — only to promptly remove it. Now organizers have announced they won’t propose any names for the festival’s lifetime achievement award, and will instead allow academy members to vote for whomever they like.

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Angouleme to add women creators to list of Grand Prix nominees

angouleme

Saying “We cannot rewrite the history of comics,” organizers of the Angouleme International Comics Festival nonetheless announced today that they will add women creators to the longlist of nominees for this year’s Grand Prix d’Angouleme. None of the creators already on the list will be removed.

The original list of 30 nominees for the festival’s prestigious lifetime achievement award contained only men, sparking a call for a boycott by the French women creators’ organization BD Egalite. As of today, 11 of the nominees, including Brian Michael Bendis, Chris Ware, Milo Manara, Daniel Clowes, Bill Sienkiewicz and Joann Sfar, had withdrawn their names from consideration for the prize.

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10 creators withdraw names from Angouleme Grand Prix list [Updated!]

Julie Maroh's drawing from the BDEgalite website

Julie Maroh’s drawing from the BDEgalite website

Ten comics creators have withdrawn their names from consideration for this year’s Grand Prix d’Angouleme, in protest that the list of 30 nominees doesn’t include a single woman.

As of this morning, Daniel Clowes, Chris Ware, Charles Burns, Riad Sattouf, Joann Sfar, Milo Manara, Pierre Christin, Etienne Davodeau, Christophe Blain and Brian Michael Bendis have indicated, personally or through their publishers, that they are joining the boycott launched by the French group BD Egalite.

Meanwhile, Franck Bondoux, executive officer of the Angouleme International Comics Festival, defended the choices in the French newspaper Le Monde, saying the Grand Prix is a lifetime achievement award for artists who have reached a certain age. “Unfortunately, there are few women in the history of comics,” he said. “That’s the reality. Similarly, if you go to the Louvre, you will find few women artists.”

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Angouleme Grand Prix’s male-only long list sparks call for boycott

angouleme

The French group BD Egalite is calling for a boycott of voting for the Grand Prix d’Angouleme because not a single female creator is included on this year’s list of 30 candidates. Cartoonist Jessica Abel provides a translation, and some context, on her Facebook page.

The Grand Prix is a lifetime achievement award, and the winner is named president of the following year’s Angouleme International Comics Festival. In the event’s 43-year history, just one woman, Florence Cestac, has been awarded the Grand Prix. Marjane Satrapi (Persepolis) and Posy Simmonds (Gemma Bovery, Tamara Drewe) have been among those nominated in years past.

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Artist charged in alleged ‘Kung Fu Panda’ shakedown

kung fu panda

A Massachusetts cartoonist has been charged with fraud and perjury stemming from his failed 2011 copyright-infringement lawsuit against DreamWorks Animation involving the 2008 blockbuster Kung Fu Panda.

According to an indictment unsealed just before Christmas by the U.S. District Attorney in Boston, artist Jayme Gordon claimed the studio had stolen the characters and story for the 2008 blockbuster, and filed a lawsuit “as part of a fraud scheme designed to obtain a multi-million-dollar settlement” from the company.

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Comics A.M. | Comic Market draws 520,000 over three days

Comic Market 89 catalog

Comic Market 89 catalog

Conventions | The winter edition of Comic Market (aka Comiket), held Dec. 29-31 at the Tokyo Big Sight, drew 520,000 attendees across three days, down from 560,000 last year. (Note that figures are based on the number of visits to the convention site over the three days, rather than individual attendees.) The largest comic convention in the world, Comic Market is held each year in August and December. [Anime News Network]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Charlie Hebdo’ to mark anniversary of attack with special issue

 

Publishing | French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo will release a special double-size issue on Jan. 6 commemorating the one-year anniversary of the  jihadist attack on its Paris office by that left 12 people dead. One million copies will be produced of the issue, which will feature drawings by the cartoonists killed in the massacre, as well as illustrations by current staff members. A special “survivors issue” released after the attack sold 7.5 million copies worldwide. [The Guardian]

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Comics A.M. | Comics, diversity and the ‘Asian superhero’

Silk #1

Silk #1

Comics | Keith Chow, editor of The Nerds of Color, responds to the New York Times opinion column that questioned the very concept of an Asian superhero, pointing out that there have actually been a number of successful Asian superheroes, several of whom debuted this year; that contrary to what the writer Umapagan Ampikaipakan says, there are a lot of superheroes in manga; and that the story of Superman, the original superhero, was essentially an immigrant story. “Coincidentally, Ampikaipakan derisively refers to Kamala Khan’s storyline in ‘Ms. Marvel’ as ‘merely another retelling of the classic American immigrant experience,’ and therefore not worthy of the universality of the superhero archetype,” Chow writes. “I guess immigrant experiences only matter so long as the immigrant isn’t brown.” [NBC News]

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Comics A.M. | The state of the newspaper comics page

Evil Inc.

Evil Inc.

Comic strips | The end of Edge City has generated a conversation about newspaper comics in general. As co-creator Ray LaBan says, creating a comic strip was his childhood fantasy, and he got to do it, “But I got to do it when everybody stopped paying attention.” This article takes a broad view, looking at the fact that newspapers’ budgets for comics, like everything else, are shrinking, online portals are providing alternatives, and readers’ strong preferences for legacy strips like Beetle Bailey and Blondie, as well as safe topics, are limiting the opportunities for new strips. Universal UClick launches one new strip a year, according to president John Glynn. On the other hand, creator Brad Guigar is taking his comic Evil Inc. out of the Inquirer because he can do better with a more mature version, published online and supported through Patreon. With interviews with the syndicates, a newspaper features editor, and creators, this piece is a well rounded look at the current state of syndicated comics. [The Philadelphia Inquirer]

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Comics A.M. | Charting the growth of the graphic novel market

"Drama," by Raina Telgemeier

“Drama,” by Raina Telgemeier

Publishing | Calvin Reid and Heidi MacDonald assemble a roundtable of comics insiders to for a detailed discussion of how the graphic novel market has evolved over the past 10 years, how their own business models have evolved, and what challenges they expect the future to bring. “Graphic novels are now firmly established in the book market worldwide in every genre: superhero, creator-owned, kids, middle-grade, young adult, webcomic, media tie-ins … etc,” says Kuo-Yu Liang, vice president of sales & marketing for Diamond Book Distributors. “While the overall book business is flat, most retailers are reporting comics/graphic novels and related merchandise as one of the few segments growing.” [Publishers Weekly]

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‘Saga,’ ‘Ms. Marvel’ and ‘Nimona’ among Angouleme finalists

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 1

The 43rd Angouleme International Comics Festival takes place next month, and the organizers have released their list of nominated works in four categories: the Sélection Officielle (the general category), Sélection Jeunesse (young people), Sélection Patrimoine (classics and reprints) and Sélection Polar (mysteries and thrillers).

These graphic novels are eligible for the juried prizes at the festival, and they also make a pretty good reading list that spans the range of graphic novels being made today in Europe, North America, and Japan. As is usually the case, many have been published in English, so I’ll include the English titles, where they are different from the French titles, in parentheses.

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Comics A.M. | Store employee foils theft of $114 in comics

JHU Comic Books employee Dani Ward (via JHU Comic Books)

JHU Comic Books employee Dani Ward (via JHU Comic Books)

Crime | An alert employee of JHU Comic Books in Staten Island helped foil a would-be shoplifter who was trying to make off with $114 worth of comics in his pants. According to police, Dani Ward noticed that Nicholas Perciballi, 22, was acting nervous, and she suspected he might be up to something, so she kept her eye on him as he shopped. Sure enough, as he was leaving the store, he allegedly dropped some comics from underneath his shirt. Ward reportedly called out and ran after Perciballi, then called the cops, who picked him up about 20 minutes later. When he was searched, police say they found four packets of heroin and a number of comics hidden in his clothes. Perciballi has been arrested three times in recent months on drug charges, and he allegedly told police, “I’m selling to support my habit and to cover my court fees from my last case.” [New York Daily News]

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Julia Wertz goes time traveling in New York

Bottle Beach

Julia Wertz, creator of the wry graphic memoirs The Fart Party, Drinking at the Movies and The Infinite Wait, has turned her hand to a different sort of subject matter: little-known aspects of the history of New York City.

The comics run in The New Yorker under the title “N.Y.C. Mystery History Hour,” and the subjects so far include Fiorello LaGuardia’s ban on pinball machines, the story of Bottle Beach in Dead Horse Bay, the fate of the uniquely designed lampposts made for the 1964-45 World’s Fair and, most recently, the Hess Spite Triangle. She has also done a fascinating then-and-now piece on the theaters of Greenpoint, Brooklyn.

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