Brigid Alverson, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 4 of 160

Professor cosplays as coral—for a cause

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Northeastern University professor Mark Patterson is at Comic-Con International to talk about his experience as a real-life Aquaman, living underwater in the Aquarius lab in Florida and as part of Fabien Cousteau’s Mission 31 project. He really got into the spirit of things in San Diego yesterday as he attended the con in cosplay—as a coral polyp.

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SDCC: Scholastic announces graphic novel by actor Greg Grunberg

Scholastic Dream Jumper
At Scholastic’s party Thursday night at Comic-Con International, the pubblisher announced the latest addition to its Graphix line of middle-grade graphic novels: Dream Jumper: Nightmare Escape, by actor Greg Grunberg (Heroes, the upcoming Star Wars: The Force Awakens). It will be illustrated by Lucas Turnbloom, creator of the comic strip Imagine This and a contributor to both the Axe Cop graphic novels and the Team Cul de Sac anthology.

The book will feature a foreword by Grunberg’s longtime friend, director J.J. Abrams.

Dream Jumper is a story about a boy who jumps into the nightmares of his friends in order to rescue them from a monster who tries to keep them from waking up. “Lucas and I met at San Diego Comic-Con. We hit it off immediately and knew we wanted to create something together,” Grunberg said in a statement. “When my 12-year-old son Ben described a dream he had about a boy who could jump in and out of his friends’ nightmares to help them fight off bad guys and monsters, it sounded like a really relatable and exciting world to build a graphic novel and I immediately thought of Lucas,” Grunberg said.

Dream Jumper will be released in June 2016.

No disclaimer for college graphic novel course

persepolisA course on graphic novels as literature at a California college won’t carry a disclaimer after all, despite a statement by the school’s president that one would be included in response to a student’s complaint about adult content in some of the required reading.

According to Redlands Daily Facts, a Crafton Hills College spokeswoman said the disclaimer was never mandated, and Professor Ryan Bartlett, who teaches the English 250 course, ultimately decided against one.

“College is supposed to be a place where students can have real exchanges about sometimes difficult topics,” Bartlett said in an email. “An English major will have to read works in the literary canon (for example Shakespeare, Chaucer and the Bible) which include similar issues present in the chosen graphic novels. If we put a disclaimer on this course, then we should put a disclaimer on all literature courses, and I do not feel comfortable going down that slippery slope.”

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‘Palomar’ returns to library shelves at New Mexico high school

palomarGilbert Hernandez’s graphic novel Palomar will be available in the Rio Rancho (New Mexico) High School library when classes resume in the fall, but there’s a catch: Students under the age of 18 will have to get a parent’s signature before they can check out the book.

Parent Katrina Lopez turned to the local news media in February after her 14-year-old son checked out the mature-readers book, reportedly thinking it might be manga. When Lopez leafed through the pages, she saw images she characterized as “pornographic.”

While a school district spokesman initially called the book “clearly inappropriate for students,” a committee chosen by the superintendent later voted to keep the book in the library, saying it met the standard of the Rio Rancho School Board’s Library Bill of Rights.

Lopez said at the time she would appeal the decision.

The Comic Book Legal Defense Fund wrote to the school board in March to defend Palomar, and accused the TV station that aired the initial story of biased reporting.

SDCC, Day 0 | Annual ZombieWalk: San Diego canceled

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There’s no quiet before the storm: Even as attendees and exhibitors prepare for Preview Night, there’s already plenty of Comic-Con International-related news unfolding. Here’s just some of what we found this morning.

• With a trial looming following the car crash that marred last year’s ZombieWalk: San Diego, organizers have announced that the popular annual event has been canceled. “The event is on indefinite hiatus due to legal matters stemming from the vehicular incident following last year’s walk,” they posted on their Facebook page. A woman was injured last year when driver Matthew Pocci drove through the crowd of spectators; Pocci, who is deaf, claims his family was frightened by the walkers. A judge has ordered him to stand trial on charges of felony reckless driving. [NBC 7 San Diego]

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Comics A.M. | Bechdel’s ‘Fun Home’ soars up bookstore chart

From "Fun Home"

From “Fun Home”

Graphic novels | The 70th volume of Naruto topped the June BookScan graphic novel charts, followed by Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home and the 23rd volume of The Walking Dead.  The rise up the chart by Bechdel’s celebrated 2006 memoir can probably be chalked up to its musical adaptation, which opened in January on Broadway and earned five Tony Awards. [ICv2]

Conventions | Lisa Halverstat rounds up some facts about Comic-Con International, including the number of attendees at the first Comic-Con (100), the number of scheduled events (2,040) and the amount of money con-goers are expected to spend in San Diego ($80.4 million, or $619 per person). [Voice of San Diego]

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Comics A.M. | Audience ‘hungry’ for diverse characters, DiDio says

We Are Robin #1

We Are Robin #1

Comics | In advance of a radio show titled “White Men in Capes,” to be broadcast Tuesday, BBC News looks at diversity in comics and finds it lacking; as DC Entertainment Co-Publisher Dan DiDio says, there “doesn’t seem to really be a proper representation of ethnic characters across the entire industry.” He talks about DC’s efforts to bring diversity to its line, and he explains why: “There’s a very hungry audience, excited audience and the reason why we know that exists is because we go to the conventions and we hear from our stores and you hear the make-up of the people shopping in those stores.” [BBC News]

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Comics A.M. | Tokyopop announces publishing relaunch

Tokyopop

Tokyopop

Manga | Tokyopop announced Thursday at Anime Expo that it will return to publishing new manga from Japan, and it has also acquired some anime licenses. In addition, it is launching an app, PopComics, that will allow users to upload and share their own comics. Tokoyopop was the largest manga publisher in the United States at the height of the manga boom, but it closed down its publishing program in 2011. In the past few years it has been making a slow-motion comeback, selling some of its properties as e-books and print-on-demand books and publishing three new volumes of Hetalia: Axis Powers. [Anime News Network]

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Comics A.M. | Scott Chantler named university’s cartoonist in residence

From "Two Generals"

From “Two Generals”

Creators | Scott Chantler, creator of Two Generals and the Three Thieves series of children’s graphic novels, will be the first-ever cartoonist in residence at the University of Windsor, in Ontario. [Our Windsor]

Cosplay | Alyssa Salazar, who runs the Tumblr The Hijabi Lolita, talks about combining frilly dresses and headscarves: “There’s really no difference, because Lolita is fairly modest to begin with. I could wear this without a scarf.” And don’t get creepy with her, because she carries pepper spray. [Vice]

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Comics A.M. | Comic-Con expected to inject $136M into local economy

Comic-Con International

Comic-Con International

Conventions | San Diego’s Convention Center Corp. has adjusted its estimate of how much money Comic-Con International pumps into the local economy, down from last year’s $178 million to $136 million, because of possible double-counting and other flaws in methodology. [Voice of San Diego]

Passings | Leonard Starr, who wrote and drew the comic strip Mary Perkins On Stage, died Tuesday at age 89. Starr started his career in 1942, when he was a student at New York’s Pratt Institute, and he worked for most of the early comics publishers: Funnies, Incorporated, Timely (now Marvel), Fawcett, E.C. and DC. He also did work for the Simon and Kirby studio, and both Joe Simon and Jack Kirby were admirers. When comics publishing began to decline in the mid-1950s, Starr began working on newspaper comics and crafting his own strip, Mary Perkins On Stage, which ran from 1957 until 1979, winning a Reuben Award in 1965. After Mary Perkins ended, Starr took over as writer and artist of Little Orphan Annie, bringing new energy to that legacy property until his retirement in 2000. He also wrote a series of graphic novels, Kelly Green, and was the main showrunner for the ThunderCats animated series. [News from ME]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Naruto’ spinoff manga to end next week

From "Weekly Shonen Jump"

From “Weekly Shonen Jump”

Manga | The Naruto spinoff Naruto: The Seventh Hokage and the Scarlet Spring, which is running simultaneously in the Japanese and American versions of Shonen Jump, will end in the July 6 issue. [Anime News Network]

Fandom | Rob Salkowitz presents results of a recent survey of convention-goers conducted by the online ticket platform Eventbrite. Interestingly, they found almost complete gender parity (48.9 percent female, 48.7 percent male, and 3.1 percent non-binary/other) among convention-goers in general but much bigger skews in individual categories: “Comics, toys and gaming are predominantly male, while media, anime/manga and sci-fi/fantasy fandom are predominantly female.” A typical con-goer spends between $100 an $500, with comics fans being the biggest spenders and prints and original art the most popular thing to buy. There’s a lot more detail in the article about what people like and don’t like (biggest beef: lack of wi-fi an connectivity in convention centers). The survey updates and expands on a similar survey conducted last year. [ICv2]

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Comics A.M. | Maine governor jokes about shooting cartoonist

Maine Gov. Paul LePage

Maine Gov. Paul LePage

Political cartoons | While speaking to a youth leadership group, Maine Gov. Paul LePage was asked by Nick Danby, the son of Bangor Daily News cartoonist George Danby, what he thought of his father’s work. LePage’s response: “I’d like to shoot him.” The audience laughed, but the joke triggered a storm of criticism in the media, coming as it does in the wake of the Charlie Hebdo shootings. The elder Danby certainly didn’t find it funny, saying that while he is critical of the governor, it’s well within the boundaries of satire. And, he added, “My other thought was, what if this was reversed? If I had made a comment. I’d be in big trouble today.” [The Huffington Post]

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Comics A.M. | Sonny Liew’s controversial GN scores third printing

The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye

The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye

Graphic novels | Sonny Liew’s graphic novel The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye has sold through its second printing in Singapore and is heading into a third, just weeks after the country’s National Arts Council abruptly withdrew funding. The graphic novel traces the career of pioneering Singaporean cartoonist Charlie Chan Hock Chye through 60 years of the country’s history and includes satirical portrayals of Lee Kuan Yew, the first prime minister of Singapore, and his rival Lim Chin Siong. An NAC official said it “potentially undermines the authority or legitimacy of the Government and its public institutions.” The graphic novel has already sold 2,500 copies, making it “the top-selling local fiction title so far this year.”

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Comics A.M. | ‘Attack on Titan’ as a reflection of Japan’s politics, history

Attack on Titan, Vol. 1

Attack on Titan, Vol. 1

Manga | Vernieda Vergara examines the way Attack on Titan reflects Japanese politics and history as well as the current sense of social anxiety experienced by young people of creator Hajime Isayama’s generation: “One of the biggest criticisms levied against Japan’s youth is that they lack the ambition of previous generations. But if the majority have no hope of advancement due to a corporate wall, why is that a surprise? In the manga, most people are content to live inside the walls. It’s safe. But as the manga’s protagonist, Eren, says, that’s like living in a cage. There’s no hope for something more. Eren, along with his allies, don’t accept this fate as easily. They fight against it actively.” [Women Write About Comics]

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Comics A.M. | Spider-Man toy inventor disappointed by ruling

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Legal | Inventor Stephen Kimble, who was dealt a final loss Monday by the Supreme Court in his years-long fight with Marvel over royalties for a Spider-Man toy, is of course disappointed by the 6-3 decision. However, he seems hopeful that there might be a legislative solution to the outdated patent law. “We can take this opinion, go to the legislators … and say, ‘Look, the court is saying that if this needs to be changed, you’re the guys to change it,’” he said. “And there is a huge body of evidence out there that this needs to be changed.” [Tucson Sentinel]

Manga | Kathryn Hemmann looks at the ways publishers courted female readers in the early days of manga, and how their strategies led to permanent changes in the comics landscape. [Contemporary Japanese Literature]

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