Chris Arrant, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 2 of 53

Aardwolf launches Kickstarter for Dave Cockrum’s ‘Futurians Return’

header

Dave Cockrum passed away in 2006, but his life’s work lives on in the minds of his fans and in the epic contributions to Marvel’s X-Men, DC Comics’ Legion of Super-Heroes, and elsewhere. And now, Aardwolf Publishing is looking to raise funds to release a never-before-seen chapter in Cockrum’s creator-owned series The Futurians, titled aptly enough, The Futurians Return.

Cockrum created The Futurians in the early 1980s following the success of the relaunched Uncanny X-Men, jumping into creator-owned with an inaugural volume published by Marvel before releasing another three issues through an upstart publisher. The series follows a group of superhumans whose powers come via a transmission from the future intended to help prevent a major disaster. Led by a hobo-turned-businessman Vandervecken (or alternately, the Dutchmen), the Futurians are assembled and quickly tasked with confronting the threats they were empowered to stop.

Continue Reading »

All-star ‘Little Nemo’ anthology dreams up a Kickstarter campaign

header

Nearly a year ago, ROBOT 6 reported on a graphic novel anthology being created in tribute to Winsor McCay’s Little Nemo. Now that dream is closer, but the publisher needs some help to make it a reality.

Locust Moon Press’ Little Nemo: Dream A Little Dream boasts an undeniably impressive contributor list, with marquee names like Peter Bagge, Paul Pope, J.H. Williams III, John Cassaday and Craig Thompson. More than 100 artists are involved with the 144-page book, with contributor J.G. Jones describing it as “perhaps the most stunningly ambitious comic project I’ve ever seen.”

Continue Reading »

‘Kyrie’ sets out on a sword-and-sandal adventure

photo-main

Do you like your sword-and-sandal epics with a heaping helping of history? Then consider the upcoming comic Kyrie by Matt Crotts. Set in the third century CE in Roman North Africa, it follows a group of thieves on the run from Egyptian authorities for some mystical artifacts.

Kyrie is a blend of three of my passions: Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies, dynamic illustration, and compelling storytelling,” Crotts writes on the campaign’s page. “Though still a stand-alone short story, [this 16-page comic] is written as a functional prologue, and will exemplify the style, characters and scope of an upcoming long-form adventure epic, to be produced separately and further down the road.”

Continue Reading »

Korean publisher brings China’s literary classics to America

header

A Korean publisher hopes to introduce the Chinese classics to U.S. readers.

JR Comics made a splash last month at BookExpo America, giving away 6,000 graphic novels from its line adapting the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature: Water Margin (adapted as Outlaws of the Marsh), Romance of the Three Kingdoms (adapted as Three Kingdoms), Journey to the West (adapted as Monkey King) and Dream of the Red Chamber. They’re among the world’s oldest novels.

Continue Reading »

Quote of the Day | The economics of creator-owned comics

Rocket_Girl_5“Regarding single issue sales: they are incredibly important to a lot of Image creators. On Rocket Girl, it’s by far the biggest chunk (of course, we don’t have a tpb yet). And every reader counts. A few thousand copies can make or break a series. If Rocket Girl dips into the 8000s, we’ll start thinking about when to wrap it up. If it stays above 12,000 we can do it forever. At 12,000 copies I can make as much writing Rocket Girl as Hulk; Amy Reeder can make as much penciling/inking/coloring as she would on Batwoman. 8000 vs 12,000 is a significant difference in percentage, but it’s not a huge amount of readers. A lot of Image creators are in the same boat, albeit their individual line might be a bit higher or lower. Certainly collected editions and digital and ancillary media/merchandise contribute as well. But a lot of making creator-owned work is down to financing: and single issues have the biggest impact on cash flow – and the only impact on cash flow for almost a full year when you take into account early production to ‘get ahead’ as well as solicitation.”

Rocket Girl writer Brandon Montclare, commenting on The Beat’s monthly analysis of indie-comics sales, and the ensuing discussion

‘Infinity’ artist Dustin Weaver branches out with ‘Amnia Cycle’

header

Dustin Weaver is best known for his work on such Marvel titles as Infinity, Avengers and S.H.I.E.L.D., but he’s also been busy creating his own space epic that most likely didn’t know existed: Amnia Cycle is a longform story that follows a space pilot named Tara and a bizarre alien life form named Amina. Weaver has drawn, and published online, three full issues of Amnia Cycle with plans to begin serializing the fourth “chapter” later this month.

Although Weaver has been seen primarily as a cover artist since the end of Infinity, that will change later this year with Marvel’s newly announced Edge of Spider-Verse series, which he’ll both write and draw. Senior Editor Nick Lowe told Comic Book Resources last week that Weaver’s work on Amnia Cycle helped secure him the writing gig.

Continue Reading »

Big robots, big troubles in ‘Giant Robot Warrior Maintenance Crew’

STANDARD TEMPLATE

Imagine an all-star team of pilots who control a giant robot dedicated to protecting the universe. Sure, that story has been told before. But what about the story of the men and women — the blue-collar workers — who actually make the giant robot work?

That’s what drives the comic  Giant Robot Warrior Maintenance Crew, and indie series by Nate Hill and Mervyn McCoy that follows the real nuts and bolts behind a giant robot named Herotron. The three-issue miniseries follows one worker in particular — Erica Pratch, a newbie to Herotron’s maintenance crew, who quickly discovers servicing Herotron isn’t as exciting as you might think. And apparently, it doesn’t help that the star pilots who control the thing are as vacant as the open space Herotron travels.

It’s Clerks meets Voltron, and looks like a giant robot-sized bit of fun. Here’s a preview of the first issue, which arrives in August:

Continue Reading »

Popeye the Sailor Man meets Sailor Moon in Fred Perry mashup

header

If you ever wondered what might happen if you were to combine Sailor Moon and Popeye the Sailor Man, Gold Digger cartoonist Fred Perry may have the answer. However, his mashup, titled Momeye the Sailor Scout, isn’t merely a one-off illustration — it’s a full-fledged comic coming soon from Antarctic Press.

Scheduled for August release, Momeye the Sailor Scout mixes Sailor Moon‘s Usagi Tsukino with E.C. Segar’s Popeye in a homage/parody that, according to the publisher, is “not just gender-bent, it’s gender punched through the ceiling!” Whereas Popeye gets his strength from spinach, Momeye gets hers from avocados — and she’ll need it, as she’ll be up against her “best frenemy,” Bruta.

Continue Reading »

Real-life superhero team purges roster, adds fitness requirement

rain-city-crew

Being a real-life superhero just got a little more real for a couple of Seattle-area vigilantes.

Famed costumed activist Phoenix Jones, founder and leader of the Rain City Superhero Movement, disbanded the group in late May only to reform it days later — only with more attention paid to the physical fitness of the budding vigilantes. In a recent interview with Seattle’s KING 5 TV, he said the area’s superhero community had become watered down by by an influx of new members, some of whom employed unethical tactics — carrying illegal weapons or refusing to give police their identities — or weren’t so “super” when it came to physical exertion.

Continue Reading »

Frank Cho unveils ‘The Jungle Queen’

header

Frank Cho has been off in the jungle, and what he’s returned with is both familiar and new.

Earlier this week the artist formally announced his next major creator-owned series, The Jungle Queen. Alluded to previously in interviews and blog posts, The Jungle Queen sees Cho return to the subgenre he visited in Marvel’s Shanna The She-Devil and in the indie series Cavewoman by Bud Root. While the story of The Jungle Queen is still shrouded in mystery, if you like Cho’s memorable drawings of women, dinosaurs and women with dinosaurs, this looks like the book for you.

Continue Reading »

Cosplay group mixes Gotham’s finest with Hefner’s Bunnies

140120_gdestefano_arkhambunnies_1080frt_cover

The creative crew of Skirts and Swords has come together for a twisted take on the denizens of Gotham City titled Arkham Bunnies. Inspired by the DC Comics  and artist Milkydayy’s own Gotham Bunnies, this amazing cosplay creation was photographed by Greg De Stefano (who can be seen as Batman). Take a look:

Continue Reading »

Jeff Weigel’s ‘Dragon Girl’ reveals creatures’ not-so-scary side

header

You may think you know dragons, but unless you’ve met one, you’re wrong. That’s the story of Jeff Weigel‘s upcoming graphic novel Dragon Girl: The Secret Valley.

Set for release June 3 by Andrews McNeel Publishing, Dragon Girl follows a young girl named Alanna growing up in medieval times who lucks upon a nest of dragon eggs and learns they’re not the tyrannical monsters her society makes them out to be. On the surface, Wiegel’s story might be comparable to How to Train Your Dragon, but upon reading it’s more akin to the children’s pony book subgenre (Black Beauty, et al.) … but with, y’know, dragons.

Continue Reading »

New comic aims to dispel ‘Comic Book Guy’ retailer stereotype

06-numberone-print-res

Every week new comics appear in stores worldwide, and soon a comic will explore how one of the stores came to be.

In the upcoming one-shot comic Number One, writer Gary Scott Beatty and artist Aaron Warner look behind the counter and into the world of comics retailing. Number One follows a budding comics fan named Steve as he transitions from reader to retailer. In a statement, Beatty said the stereotype of comic retailers is “distorted,” and he’s hoping to change that.

Continue Reading »

Conversing on Comics with Colleen Doran

HEADER-TEMPLATE-Conversing-On-Comics

Colleen Doran loves comics. Although she’s best known for her creator-owned series A Distant Soil, she has no qualms about working on someone else’s projects, from The Sandman to Spider-Man to licensed properties. To Doran, it’s all part of a balanced diet.

On June 4, DC Comics will release The Vampire Diaries #6, a standalone story written and drawn by Doran, who has previously penned issues of the series, based on The CW’s hit supernatural drama. She completed the work months ago, and has a busy schedule ahead of her that includes a graphic novel with Neil Gaiman, a new series with Top Cow’s Matt Hawkins and a resumption of The Book of Lost Souls with J. Michael Straczynski.

In a previous interview, Doran told me she enjoys being busy, defining herself as a “work reveler” as opposed to a workaholic, but I managed to catch up with her to talk about these projects, her process and discussing the business of comics.

Continue Reading »

Tony Moore teams with comedian Marc Maron for weekly comic

header

Tony Moore has drawn zombies, militant popes, dead presidents and alien invaders, but now he’s tackling a subject even more challenging: Marc Maron.

Moore announced he’s collaborating with the popular comedian/podcast host on a series of one-panel comics based on episodes of IFC’s Maron (the cable refers to them as “recaps”). Installments will be released concurrently with new episodes, which debut Thursdays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives