Chris Arrant, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 2 of 56

New Stuart and Kathryn Immonen book tops AdHouse slate

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Stuart and Kathryn Immonen‘s Russian Olive to Red King will headline a boisterous lineup of books coming in the spring from AdHouse Books. The slate, announced on The Comics Reporter, features Ignatz winner Sophie Goldstein’s new book The Oven in April, the Immonens’ long-gestating graphic novel in May, and the fourth issue of Ethan Rilly’s Pope Hats in June.

In 2010 Stuart Immonen spoke briefly to ROBOT 6 about Russian Olive to Red King, calling it a “tortured love story” featuring “petroglyphs and plane crashes and bad dogs and angry people.”

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Conversing on Comics with Ivan Brandon

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Ivan Brandon‘s stories may initially appear to be one thing, but when you read them you discover they’re actually something else entirely. The writer’s 2009 series Viking was a crime drama, and his new series Drifter is a story of frontier expansion in the 1800s — despite being set in the far-flung future. Many of Brandon’s stories have a technological bent, however; from his 2003 debut writing Terminator to his indie series NYC Mech to Machine Man in Marvel Comics Presents.

Drifter, with artist Nic Klein, debuted this week, and Brandon is in the middle of a four-city signing tour that finds him at Leed’s Thought Bubble this weekend and London’s Orbital Comics on Wednesday. It’s a familiar territory, launching a series, but he views the landscape of creator-owned comics differently today that he did when he started more than a decade ago.

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D is for Daredevil: Papercraft type based on Marvel characters

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Captain America once proudly said the “A” doesn’t stand for France, but in this intriguing art series neither does it stand for “America.” Instead it’s Archangel. But don’t worry, Cap fans: He lays claim to “C.”

Designer Eddy Ymeri has created an inventive papercraft series based on Marvel characters titled Superhero Caps. Created as a portfolio piece, the series depicts select letters using the colors, style and patterns of popular Marvel heroes and villains like Daredevil, the Hulk, Loki, and others. While Ymeri has only created 10 letters so far, these inspiring pieces may hit home for fans of design and comics. You can view them all at the website Ymeri set up, SuperheroCaps.

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Wrestling with real-life drama in ‘Headlocked’

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Mickey Rourke’s turn in the celebrated 2008 drama The Wrestler showed just how real the “fake” world of professional wrestling can be, but there’s more than one story to be told.

Michael Kingston’s indie series Headlocked takes up that challenge, as it documents the struggles of young wrestling fan Mike Hartman as he attempts to break into the industry. Beneath the masks, costumes and colorful tights are men and women with real lives and real problems — something Hartman sees for himself when he’s taken under the wing of an aging wrestler named Mr. Destruction, who’s looking for a comeback.

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On the heels of Sailor Moon’s return comes ‘Crystal Cadets’

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The upstart comics publisher Lion Forge has launched launched a new entry in the classic magical girl genre with its new series Crystal Cadets.

Created by writer Anne Toole and artist Katie O’Neill, Crystal Cadets follows a middle-school student named Zoe who’s gifted a magical crystal that gives her powers and membership in an elite but discreet sisterhood called (of course) the Crystal Cadets. Featuring members pulled from across the globe, this multicultural story shows these girls of all shapes, sizes and backgrounds learning and mastering special abilities in pursuit of a better life for themselves and their world.

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Conversing on Comics with Aubrey Sitterson

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Aubrey Sitterson made a name for himself as the editor of such Marvel titles as The Irredeemable Ant-Man and Strange Tales, but he that behind for the world of professional wrestling. But after spending the past few years working for WWE and moonlighting for a time as editor of The Walking Dead and Invincible, Sitterson is looking to conquer the comics world as a writer.

Earlier this year Arcana published his graphic novel Worth, produced with the estate of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry, and he’s currently merging wrestling, comics, barbarians and aliens in the webcomic King Maul. Sitterson and artist Zak Kinsella just returned from a brief hiatus following the first issue, and promise a new page each Monday.

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SLG Publishing launches its fourth crowdfunding effort

SLG Publishing has been a major part of the American comics industry, helping to usher in notable creators like Charles Soule, Jhonen Vasquez and Jim Rugg. But for the past few years the publisher has been struggling.

Founder Dan Vado has been public about the company’s financial status, turning to crowdfunding platforms for help in keeping the business afloat — but with little success. He organized two unsuccessful Kickstarter campaigns in 2012, and returned this year, first with a GoFundMe effort and now with Patreon.

While none of the campaigns have reached the stated goal, Vado remains hopeful. The comics industry has witnessed numerous successful crowdfunding campaigns (even on a publisher level, such as with Fantagraphics), but SLG’s plight underscores that, unfortunately, they don’t all work out that way. But what’s so different about SLG’s situation?

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Fantagraphics to collect Argentine sci-fi classic ‘Eternonaut’

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Fantagraphics is bringing one of the pillars of South American comics to the United States for the first time.

In August 2015, Fantagraphics will publish an English adaptation of the first storyline of El Eternauta, aka The Eternonaut. Created in the late 1950s by writer and revolutionary Héctor Germán Oesterheld alongside artist Francisco Solano López, The Eternonaut is a rollicking sci-fi tale about a group of people living in the midst of an alien invasion. The story is post-apocalyptic, but veers into the weird with mutated animals, insects and even humans that the group fights just as much as the alien invaders. Midway through the story, the group is split apart due to a malfunctioning time-travel device on one of the alien’s ship, stranding some of the heroes in time and sending them on a new quest to find each other.

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French comic about time travel, true love eyes U.S. audience

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What if you went your entire life went without meeting your true love, and you only found it due to a time-travel accident? And what if your job was to eliminate these kinds of accidents? Would you fix the timestream or fix yourself up with your true love?

That’s the story of The Infinite Loop by Pierrick Colinet and Elsa Charretier, which debuts next month in France — but the creators are already looking toward an American release. The duo was at New York Comic Con earlier this month to drum up interest in the six-issue series from English-language publishers.

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DJs take center stage in dystopian ‘Future Prophecy’

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Superheroes come from all walks of life: journalists, scientists, school teachers, lawyers, even fast-food workers. But what about a DJ? In The Future Prophecy, two DJ sisters take on a dystopian version of Toronto under the control of a mutant army. But they aren’t just any DJ sisters, they’re creators — and real-life DJs — Sara Simms and Melle Oh.

So far, Simms and Oh have self-published two issues of The Future Prophecy, but to produce four more they’ve turned to Kickstarter.

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AT&T U-verse releases short film on Toronto’s R.A.I.D. studio

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Making comics is generally a solitary experience, but there are a few pockets of camaraderie that have sprung up where artists share a space and work together. One of the most thriving spaces is Toronto’s R.A.I.D. Short for the Royal Academy of Illustration & Design, it’s where some of today’s top comic artists, including Francis Manapul, Ramón Pérez, Cary Nord and Kalman Andrasofzsky, do a majority of their work — and they’re now the subject of a short documentary film.

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Quote of the Day | Kurt Busiek on writing ‘believable women’

Kurt-Busiek“I’ve never been asked how to write believable male characters. I have been asked how to write believable female characters, as if they’re alien beings or something.

‘How do I write believable women?’ from male writers, is essentially asking how to write characters that are different from you. But all characters are different from you, or should be, unless they’re you. Characters are individuals, not types. If you’re writing them as types, you’re doing it wrong.

All characters are like you in some ways, and not like you in others. How do you write the parts that aren’t like you? Same as you do with any character. You have eyes, ears and a brain. You write from observation, experience, research and analysis.

If you’re writing a woman, you’re not writing a ‘women.’ Write her. That character, that individual. A person, not a category.”

– Kurt Busiek, writing in response to the oft-asked question of “writing believable female characters” posed to comics writers

Take a look at DC Collectibles’ Jae Lee action figure line

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Jae Lee’s work on Superman/Batman has simultaneously been among the most unique and divisive of DC Comics’ New 52. After years working on Marvel’s adaptation of Stephen King’s The Dark Tower, Lee’s return to superhero work has found a balance between iconic and creepy; while his style might seem tailor-made for the likes of Batman and Catwoman, his depiction of Superman has been both haunting and boyish in all the various main- and alternate-universe incarnations.

And now, DC is using those designs as the basis for a line of collectible figures.

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Corto Maltese sets sail with new story by ‘Blacksad’ writer

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Corto Maltese is one of the most prized series and characters in European comics, and now he’s coming back.

The comic’s longtime publisher Casterman has announced the October 2015 release of the first new Corto Maltese story in 25 years. As creator Hugo Platt passed away in 1995, Blacksad writer Juan Diaz Canales will be joined by artist Ruben Pellejero for the new story. There’s no word word whether this will be serialized or published as a standalone book, but Casterman promises it will be released simultaneously in Europe in French, Spanish, Italian and Dutch. What about English-speaking audiences? Well, that’s another story.

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Nate Simpson resurfaces with video game, ‘Nonplayer’ update

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Cartoonist Nate Simpson burst into comics in 2011 with his Image Comics series Nonplayer. He won the prestigious Russ Manning Most Promising Newcomer Award just three months later, sold the film rights to he comic, and then unfortunately broke is collarbone. Now, three years later, he’s back — but not how you might think.

Simpson, who resumed his career in video games, announced on his blog that he created a new game for Uber Entertainment called Human Resources, on which he’s serving as art director.

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