Chris Arrant, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 3 of 56

‘Die Hard’ meets Disneyland in ‘Ricky Rouse Has a Gun’

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What if terrorists took over a theme park, and the only onwho could save you was one of the park’s costumed mascots? That’s the story of the recently released graphic novel Ricky Rouse Has a Gun by writer/director Jörg Tittel and artist John Aggs. Using thinly veiled versions of Disney’s mascot and a host of other media properties to to populate their theme park, Tittel and Aggs aren’t only making an action story, they’re critiquing corporate consumerism.

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Sword & sorcery & stoners in ‘King Maul’

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Artist Zak Kinsalla says his new webcomic King Maul, created with former Marvel editor Aubrey Sitterson, is about a “space barbarian,” but I think he means “space” in more ways than one.

Premiering in August, King Maul centers on a savage warrior (named King Maul, of course) who burst out of a portal in space with ominous narrative boxes dubbing him a conqueror, destroyer and creator of an empire. His first battle, with an unnamed green-skinned alien, is less Conan the Barbarian and more WWE Raw — in a good way. In early episodes, fighting is briefly delayed when Maul is offered to smoke a mysterious substance, only to be renewed with his newly established battle cry of “Baaaaaaaaaaallllllssss.”

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Ba and Moon mark project’s completion with unique tradition

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Like most comic creators around the world, celebrated artists Gabriel Ba and Fabio Moon work from home. That doesn’t require much in the way of a dress code, but for the past nine years the two brothers have celebrated the completion of major projects with a unique tradition: dressing up.

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Sean Murphy goes old-school arcade with ‘Castlevania’ art

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Sean Murphy is in the middle of drawing his first Image Comics series — a collaboration with Rick Remender called Tokyo Ghost — but he still has time for a side project, especially a fun one. Over the weekend Murphy posted a gorgeous illustration based on the classic video game Castlevania, but it’s not just a pin-up — it’s a piece done to the specifications of a classic stand-up arcade box.

“For fun, I’m going to do a series of pieces that are 23×7 like the marquee of a retro stand-up arcade machine (it’s that plexiglass light at the top),” Murphy writes.

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As Scotland decides its future, a new hero emerges: Scotsman

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The fate of the United Kingdom will be decided in five hours, when the polls close on a referendum that determines whether Scotland will declare independence from England after 307 years. To mark the historic occasion, U.K. digital publisher Eco Comics has introduced an “all-new, all-Scottish” superhero in the form of Scotsman

The Mohawk Media imprint unveiled the character’s design on Wednesday. Eco Comics editor Stuart Buckley told ROBOT 6 that Scotsman will be introduced in the recently launched Englishman series, and a one-shot is already in the works. However, whether he’ll be Englishman’s friend or foe will depend on today’s vote.

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The Holy See gets unholy in ‘Roman Ritual’

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Exorcism has long been staple of horror fiction, whether film, television, comics or prose. But two Spanish creators are dialing up  turning it up a notch by showing a person in need of an exorcism who lives at the Vatican. That’s right, the pope is possessed.

Debuting next week from Amigo Comics, Roman Ritual is a four-issue miniseries by El Torres and Jaime Martinez that sees self-exiled Catholic priest John Brennan summoned to Rome when the Pope becomes possessed. It’s certainly a provocative premise, and Torres and Martinez don’t shy away from it.

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‘Flight’ artist spreads his wings with ‘Jellybots’

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After years of working on anthologies and as a concept artist, Nicholas Kole is looking to make a name for himself … with jelly.

The Rhode Island artist recently launched Jellybots, a webcomic about a boy named Sam who’s enrolled by his family in a prestigious school called the Frontier Academy. Not much else is known about the series, given that it’s just six pages into its run, but the concept material and pin-up art show Sam interacting with supernatural, whimsical and fluid jellyfish.

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New service Comic Cartel thinks outside (and about) the box

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Mail-order comics services have been around for decades, but with the Internet they’ve grown by leaps and bounds. Still, when you put together the words “online” and “comics,” many people naturally think digital, but a new online mail-order business is putting print — and comics as a physical product — squarely into the limelight.

Launched earlier this summer, Comic Cartel has the standard offerings of other online mail-order services, with the ability to shop for individual issues and graphic novels, as well to create subscriptions. But what sets Comics Cartel apart is its attention to detail when it comes to comics as a physical object — one worthy of high care and exceptional packaging.

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80-year-old Art Deco artist primes for his comic debut

dd2641dccf3bc3ed0b03486cd90d525c_largePolish expat Andre Krayewski has had a long and interesting life. Born in 1933 in Stalinist Poland, de Krayeski dreamed of America and jazz music, and he expressed himself through art. With his Art Deco style, he became known in his home country for creating Polish movie posters, and he later moved to America, where he found success in the art scene. He’s best known for creating the 1997 Panasonic Jazz Festival poster, as well as paintings for the New York Film Academy.

The artist put pen to paper and wrote a-semi autobiographic novel titled Skyliner relating his jazz-loving youth in 1950s Poland. And now, at age 80, Krayewski is adapting that work for comics.

Described by his son Ed Krayewski as “a love letter to the American myth,” Skyliner is the story of a Polish teenager coming of age behind the Iron Curtain as the influence of American culture spread around the world. Krayewski adapted his story over the past two years with help from his son while undergoing dialysis treatments.

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Meet comics’ ‘first autistic superhero’

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We’ve seen superheroes with all sorts of abilities, and now a new comic is introducing one hero who uses his own autism to save people.

First mentioned here a year ago, Face Value Comics is now available in comic stores and online, and features a young man named Michael with a keen mathematical mind in a steampunk world. Created by writer Dave Kot and illustrated by Sky Owens, the story and the message of Face Value Comics has struck a chord with its depiction of what’s believed to be the first autistic superhero in comic books.

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Film company kickstarts medieval horror GN by Chuck Dixon

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Film company Framelight Productions has launched a $20,000 Kickstarter campaign to fund Sword of Wood, a graphic novel based on an unpublished medieval horror story by Chuck Dixon. Framelight acquired the film and transmedia rights to Dixon’s story in 2010, and has hired the writer and artist Estève Polls to create the graphic novel.

Set during the First Crusade, Sword of Wood follows a holy knight named Lord Corrington who returns to his hometown to find the village ransacked by a swarm of vampires led by a villainous lord dubbed “the Apostle.”

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Marko Djurdjevic resurrects creator-owned RPG ‘Degenesis’

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Marko Djurdjević took comics by storm when he arrived in 2007, producing regal artwork for Marvel. But within three years, he returned to video-game concept art and founded his own company. Now the Serbian artist is creating something new out of something old with Degenesis: Rebirth Edition.

Degenesis is a tabletop role-playing game he created in 2003 with Christian Guenther, and while it faded into memory for some fans it’s something Djurdjević has never forgotten. Now, with his company SIXMOREVODKA, he’s revising and reissuing Degenesis: Rebirth Edition.

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Kris Anka cuts loose with amazing Captain America illustration

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Kris Anka stays pretty busy as one of the regular rotating artists of Uncanny X-Men, but you want to see him take a spin on another of Marvel’s marquee franchises, look no further than his depiction of the Sentinel of Liberty and his supporting cast from Captain America: The Winter Soldier.

Although Anka debuted the artwork only last week on his blog, it was produced a few years ago and never released. He explained it was intended to accompany Sideshow Collectibles’ Captain America Premium Format statue, but it wasn’t approved in time to be included in the packaging.

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Meet Travel Foreman’s new heroes, the New A-Holes

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Capturing readers’ imaginations with DC Comics’ New 52 series Animal Man, artist Travel Foreman has displayed an ability to create pitch-perfect superhero drama while inserting some gut-wrenching weirdness. And now, after working for most of his career for Marvel and DC, Foreman is putting the finishing touches on an anthology featuring stories written and drawn by him — including the provocatively titled “The New A-Holes.”

Called Zuerst Science Fiction Magazine, the anthology has been mentioned on social media by Foreman for years, but in a recent blog post, the artist says it should debut in “late 2014, early 2015.” Why should you be excited? Just take a look at the New A-Holes …

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The idiosyncracy and awesomeness of commissioning art

"Sammy Davis Jr." by Dustin Harbin

“Sammy Davis Jr.” by Dustin Harbin

In what other medium can a someone get an original work of art made just for them by a creator whose career they’ve followed? Not movies, television, music or fine art, unless you’re a millionaire. But in comics, many of today’s artists are for hire to fans looking to own a piece of their work — and even commission something especially for them. Comics are crazy that way, but that’s a good thing.

It’s nothing new, of course. The idea itself goes back into the roots of fine art, but with the advent of conventions and now the internet it’s available to virtually everyone — with some creators even reaching out to fans to make it happen.

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