Chris Arrant, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 3 of 54

Music meets comics in Nine Inch Nails tribute anthology

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In its strictest sense, music and comics couldn’t be further apart — even the most flagrant of comic book sound effects are, in fact, silent. But in the past decade, a number of comics creators with a passion for musical acts have stepped forward and created tributes to their favorite musicians — with notable comics based on or inspired by the likes of Tori Amos, Johnny Cash and Spearmint. Shawn Demumbrum has turned that trend into an informal line of independent anthologies through his company SpazDog Press, peaking now with Nothing Can Stop Me Now: Stories Inspired by Nine Inch Nails.

This upcoming graphic novel anthology, now seeking funds on Kickstarter, has writers and artists creating four- to eight-page stories based on songs from the band’s catalog. Led by a story by Caleb Monroe and Jason Copland based on “Every Day is Exactly the Same,” the collection also features contributions from such creators as Dirk Manning, Caanan White, Salgood Sam, Ryan Cody, Artyom Trakhanov and Joel Gomez. Unlike Demumbrum’s three previous “Inspired by” anthologies, Nothing Can Stop Me Now will be a full-color hardcover.

“Making comics with people who are passionate about the same music I like is something that want to continue to do. I want to continue to challenge myself as a creator and a publisher,” Demumbrum said in a press release. “Going from black and white to color and soft cover to hard cover are just two of the challenges. I wanted to add a pinup gallery so I could attract creators who didn’t have time in their schedule for a full story, but could create a single image for the book. For the previous books, I wanted to make the books PG-13 so that stores could carry them without restriction. The comic book industry has broadened even in the past few years. Comic books like Saga have pushed a mainstream mature to the forefront. I want the Nine Inch Nails book to reflect that type of book.”

Nine Inch Nails and its frontman Trent Reznor have a surprisingly long history of inspiring comics: An early issue of J. Scott Campbell’s Gen13 had a villain created as a homage to Reznor, and the 2004 independent comic Chang Fury featured the singer/songwriter as a fictionalized character. Likewise, Reznor and his bandmates have mentioned they’re comic readers as well, and the band’s 2007 album Year Zero reportedly had an tie-in comic in the works, but was never officially released.

The Kickstarter for Nothing Can Stop Me Now has raised nearly $12,000 toward its $14,000 goal with more than two weeks left.

Jamie McKelvie shows how he’d redesign Iron Man

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Jamie McKelvie may be spending his days working on his new creator-owned series The Wicked + The Divine, but that doesn’t mean he’s not still thinking about superheroes from time to time. The artist, who had a successful run at Marvel on Young Avengers, The Defenders and X-Men: Season One, has unveiled an Iron Man redesign he came up with the other night, just for fun.

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20-somethings seek to recapture their youth in ‘House Party’

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Nostalgia can be great, but sometimes memories can give us a skewed, rose-tinted view of what really happened. In the recently released graphic novel House Party, Rachael Smith follows three friends who try to recapture the zest of their university days by throwing a house party like the ones they remember.

Gold medalist Doug Larson once said, “Nostalgia is a file that removes the rough edges from the good old days.” Or as a famous fictional space pirate once said, “I’ve got a bad feeling about this.”

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Steve Rolston plots noir-ish webcomic, with the aid of Patreon

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Steve Rolston, known for his work on such titles as Queen & Country, The Escapists and Ghost Projekt, is looking to return to telling his own stories — well, one story in particular, involving a bear, a raccoon and a writer.

They star in a new webcomic Rolston is developing called Trapezius Pepper, which he describes as “noir-ish tale of a washed-up writer pushing his luck in a city of crime.” Its’ the product of years of Rolston’s doodling and thinking while working on other projects. He’s beginning Trapezius Pepper with a series of one-page comics to develop the story and his approach, before jumping into long-form storytelling.

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Aardwolf launches Kickstarter for Dave Cockrum’s ‘Futurians Return’

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Dave Cockrum passed away in 2006, but his life’s work lives on in the minds of his fans and in the epic contributions to Marvel’s X-Men, DC Comics’ Legion of Super-Heroes, and elsewhere. And now, Aardwolf Publishing is looking to raise funds to release a never-before-seen chapter in Cockrum’s creator-owned series The Futurians, titled aptly enough, The Futurians Return.

Cockrum created The Futurians in the early 1980s following the success of the relaunched Uncanny X-Men, jumping into creator-owned with an inaugural volume published by Marvel before releasing another three issues through an upstart publisher. The series follows a group of superhumans whose powers come via a transmission from the future intended to help prevent a major disaster. Led by a hobo-turned-businessman Vandervecken (or alternately, the Dutchmen), the Futurians are assembled and quickly tasked with confronting the threats they were empowered to stop.

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All-star ‘Little Nemo’ anthology dreams up a Kickstarter campaign

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Nearly a year ago, ROBOT 6 reported on a graphic novel anthology being created in tribute to Winsor McCay’s Little Nemo. Now that dream is closer, but the publisher needs some help to make it a reality.

Locust Moon Press’ Little Nemo: Dream A Little Dream boasts an undeniably impressive contributor list, with marquee names like Peter Bagge, Paul Pope, J.H. Williams III, John Cassaday and Craig Thompson. More than 100 artists are involved with the 144-page book, with contributor J.G. Jones describing it as “perhaps the most stunningly ambitious comic project I’ve ever seen.”

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‘Kyrie’ sets out on a sword-and-sandal adventure

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Do you like your sword-and-sandal epics with a heaping helping of history? Then consider the upcoming comic Kyrie by Matt Crotts. Set in the third century CE in Roman North Africa, it follows a group of thieves on the run from Egyptian authorities for some mystical artifacts.

Kyrie is a blend of three of my passions: Classical and Ancient Near Eastern Studies, dynamic illustration, and compelling storytelling,” Crotts writes on the campaign’s page. “Though still a stand-alone short story, [this 16-page comic] is written as a functional prologue, and will exemplify the style, characters and scope of an upcoming long-form adventure epic, to be produced separately and further down the road.”

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Korean publisher brings China’s literary classics to America

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A Korean publisher hopes to introduce the Chinese classics to U.S. readers.

JR Comics made a splash last month at BookExpo America, giving away 6,000 graphic novels from its line adapting the Four Great Classical Novels of Chinese literature: Water Margin (adapted as Outlaws of the Marsh), Romance of the Three Kingdoms (adapted as Three Kingdoms), Journey to the West (adapted as Monkey King) and Dream of the Red Chamber. They’re among the world’s oldest novels.

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Quote of the Day | The economics of creator-owned comics

Rocket_Girl_5“Regarding single issue sales: they are incredibly important to a lot of Image creators. On Rocket Girl, it’s by far the biggest chunk (of course, we don’t have a tpb yet). And every reader counts. A few thousand copies can make or break a series. If Rocket Girl dips into the 8000s, we’ll start thinking about when to wrap it up. If it stays above 12,000 we can do it forever. At 12,000 copies I can make as much writing Rocket Girl as Hulk; Amy Reeder can make as much penciling/inking/coloring as she would on Batwoman. 8000 vs 12,000 is a significant difference in percentage, but it’s not a huge amount of readers. A lot of Image creators are in the same boat, albeit their individual line might be a bit higher or lower. Certainly collected editions and digital and ancillary media/merchandise contribute as well. But a lot of making creator-owned work is down to financing: and single issues have the biggest impact on cash flow – and the only impact on cash flow for almost a full year when you take into account early production to ‘get ahead’ as well as solicitation.”

Rocket Girl writer Brandon Montclare, commenting on The Beat’s monthly analysis of indie-comics sales, and the ensuing discussion

‘Infinity’ artist Dustin Weaver branches out with ‘Amnia Cycle’

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Dustin Weaver is best known for his work on such Marvel titles as Infinity, Avengers and S.H.I.E.L.D., but he’s also been busy creating his own space epic that most likely didn’t know existed: Amnia Cycle is a longform story that follows a space pilot named Tara and a bizarre alien life form named Amina. Weaver has drawn, and published online, three full issues of Amnia Cycle with plans to begin serializing the fourth “chapter” later this month.

Although Weaver has been seen primarily as a cover artist since the end of Infinity, that will change later this year with Marvel’s newly announced Edge of Spider-Verse series, which he’ll both write and draw. Senior Editor Nick Lowe told Comic Book Resources last week that Weaver’s work on Amnia Cycle helped secure him the writing gig.

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Big robots, big troubles in ‘Giant Robot Warrior Maintenance Crew’

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Imagine an all-star team of pilots who control a giant robot dedicated to protecting the universe. Sure, that story has been told before. But what about the story of the men and women — the blue-collar workers — who actually make the giant robot work?

That’s what drives the comic  Giant Robot Warrior Maintenance Crew, and indie series by Nate Hill and Mervyn McCoy that follows the real nuts and bolts behind a giant robot named Herotron. The three-issue miniseries follows one worker in particular — Erica Pratch, a newbie to Herotron’s maintenance crew, who quickly discovers servicing Herotron isn’t as exciting as you might think. And apparently, it doesn’t help that the star pilots who control the thing are as vacant as the open space Herotron travels.

It’s Clerks meets Voltron, and looks like a giant robot-sized bit of fun. Here’s a preview of the first issue, which arrives in August:

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Popeye the Sailor Man meets Sailor Moon in Fred Perry mashup

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If you ever wondered what might happen if you were to combine Sailor Moon and Popeye the Sailor Man, Gold Digger cartoonist Fred Perry may have the answer. However, his mashup, titled Momeye the Sailor Scout, isn’t merely a one-off illustration — it’s a full-fledged comic coming soon from Antarctic Press.

Scheduled for August release, Momeye the Sailor Scout mixes Sailor Moon‘s Usagi Tsukino with E.C. Segar’s Popeye in a homage/parody that, according to the publisher, is “not just gender-bent, it’s gender punched through the ceiling!” Whereas Popeye gets his strength from spinach, Momeye gets hers from avocados — and she’ll need it, as she’ll be up against her “best frenemy,” Bruta.

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Real-life superhero team purges roster, adds fitness requirement

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Being a real-life superhero just got a little more real for a couple of Seattle-area vigilantes.

Famed costumed activist Phoenix Jones, founder and leader of the Rain City Superhero Movement, disbanded the group in late May only to reform it days later — only with more attention paid to the physical fitness of the budding vigilantes. In a recent interview with Seattle’s KING 5 TV, he said the area’s superhero community had become watered down by by an influx of new members, some of whom employed unethical tactics — carrying illegal weapons or refusing to give police their identities — or weren’t so “super” when it came to physical exertion.

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Frank Cho unveils ‘The Jungle Queen’

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Frank Cho has been off in the jungle, and what he’s returned with is both familiar and new.

Earlier this week the artist formally announced his next major creator-owned series, The Jungle Queen. Alluded to previously in interviews and blog posts, The Jungle Queen sees Cho return to the subgenre he visited in Marvel’s Shanna The She-Devil and in the indie series Cavewoman by Bud Root. While the story of The Jungle Queen is still shrouded in mystery, if you like Cho’s memorable drawings of women, dinosaurs and women with dinosaurs, this looks like the book for you.

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Cosplay group mixes Gotham’s finest with Hefner’s Bunnies

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The creative crew of Skirts and Swords has come together for a twisted take on the denizens of Gotham City titled Arkham Bunnies. Inspired by the DC Comics  and artist Milkydayy’s own Gotham Bunnies, this amazing cosplay creation was photographed by Greg De Stefano (who can be seen as Batman). Take a look:

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