Chris Arrant, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 3 of 52

Matt Smith cleaves an opening for his own ‘Barbarian Lord’

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Just as there’s room for more than one superhero in comics, there’s room for more barbarian. And on July 1, cartoonist Matt Smith makes his graphic novel debut with a story about a farmer who trades his plow for a sword and ax to become Barbarian Lord.

Originally serialized online, Barbarian Lord is being expanded and honed like a sword on the proverbial smith’s anvil for the Clarion Books release. Mixing the standard-bearer for barbarism that is Conan with elements of Hellboy, Norse mythology, Icelandic sagas and the timeless story of a farm boy becoming a man, Barbaric Lord looks to be a combination of big action and sly humor.

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A crime comic with killer art in ‘Tommy Centro’

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“It’s the story of a kid named Tommy Centro, his friends, and one really bad psychopath motherfucker.”

Why paraphrase when writer Jakob Free can sum it up like that? That’s the story of the webcomic series Tommy Centro, which Free and artists Jon Cairns, J.D. Faith and Daniel Irizarri have been serializing for the past year at TommyCentro.com. The series, now 50 pages into its long-form story, follows Centro on the trail of a murderer known as the Enigma Killer, and the complications that ensue with the involvement of friends, family and a retired vigilante named the Roman.

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Conversing on Comics with Marcos Martin

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Marcos Martin grew up reading American superhero comics imported to his native Spain, and for the first 13 years of his career, he lived, breathed and drew those heroes in titles like Batgirl: Year One, Doctor Strange: The Oath, The Amazing Spider-Man and Daredevil. But now he’s moved on, devoting himself primarily to creator-owned comics with a reach beyond the direct market. The first sign of that is The Private Eye, the digital comic he created with celebrated writer Brian K. Vaughan about the price of privacy in a futuristic world.

Both Martin and Vaughan have talked with CBR about their project, so for this installment of “Conversing on Comics” I reached deeper into the artist’s work, looking for his influences and his choices. The interview, conducted in late April via Skype, pulls back the curtain on Martin, an ambitious but private professional who’s looking to entertain not just the ardent comic book fan but also more mainstream readers interested in fiction and fables.

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Joe Keatinge says his ‘Vertigo Quarterly’ story was ‘drastically altered’

3790755-01Following the debut today of Vertigo Quarterly: CMYK, a four-issue anthology series from the DC Comics imprint, writer Joe Keatinge was quick to speak out about his collaboration in the first issue with artist Ken Garing, which he says was substantially rewritten by editorial without any consultation with him.

“The issue is advertised as featuring a collaboration between Ken Garing and me, with me on story and Ken on art, but there’s an issue with this and I felt the need to make it clear,” Keatinge wrote on his blog. “The story as published does not entirely reflect what we conceived and I originally wrote. I’m going to make this as quick possible as there’s a lot going on in the world that actually matters, but I felt like, after the warm reception to Shutter and Planetoid, some people reading this might buy comics with our names on them and thought it was unfair to them to not say something.”

He explained that he was approached to contribute a story to Vertigo Quarterly, and he looped in Garing, with whom he’s working on an upcoming series. Vertigo editor Mark Doyle was “very accommodating,” Keatinge said, but upon receiving a mock-up of the completed story the writer discovered it had been changed significantly — without consultation or an opportunity for him to address the issues Vertigo sought to address.

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Mike Mitchell displays Marvel love with 52 character portraits

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You don’t have to have powers to be a superhero, but you do have to stand out in a crowd, a quality popular commercial artist Mike Mitchell has captured in his profile portraits of 52 Marvel heroes and villains. Through May 17, Austin’s Mondo Gallery is showcasing Mitchell’s portraits in a exhibition called Mike Mitchell x Marvel x Mondo. But even if you you can’t make it to Texas, you can still view the work, as he’s posted all 52 on his website.

“I picked my personal favorites, while also considering which characters would make decent portraits,” Mitchell told CBR earlier this month. “I can’t explain why, but I love the original Luke Cage design [revealed with the CBR interview]. There’s something very cool and timeless about him. Even though we live in an era where that version is out of style, I highly prefer it to the current, shaved head, yellow shirt and sunglasses Luke Cage.”

Here is a selection of some of the pieces, but go to Mitchell’s website for all of them.

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Take-Two is hiring for its new comics imprint, Double Take

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News broke in December that Bill Jemas, the former Marvel executive who helped turned around the once-bankrupt company, had joined with video game publisher Take-Two Interactive to launch a comics imprint. Jemas said at the time that plans were still in the early stages for the new venture, which will focus on developing new properties rather than titles based on the Take-Two catalog. But now the company is ramping up its efforts by staffing the new comics division, which officially has a name: Double Take.

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Behold Skottie Young’s fantastic sketches from C2E2

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One of the best things about comic conventions is the opportunity to meet the many talented artists on hand, see their original work and even commission pieces from them. Skottie Young is a familiar face in artist’s alleys across the United States, and over the weekend he set up at the Chicago Comic & Entertainment Expo, where he turned out amazing original art for some lucky fans.

Young offered custom sketches on colored paper of a character of fans’ choosing. Many took him up on that, and Young has posted some of his favorite on his website. If after seeing these you’re interested in commissioning one of your own (I am!), Young will be attending four more conventions this summer: Motor City in Detroit in May, HeroesCon in Charlotte in June, Boston Comicon in August and Cincy Comicon in September. Keep an eye on his website, as he normally posts details before each convention.

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Six by 6 | Six spectacularly bald comic characters

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Baldness. Decades before it became de rigueur, it was a popular look in superhero comics. Marvel has killed off two bald figures in the past couple of years (Professor X in Avengers vs. X-Men and Uatu in the forthcoming Original Sin), but that barely scratches the surfaces of the legions of smooth-scalped characters in the hairless history of superhero and sci-fi comics.

In this installment of Six by 6, we take a look at six standout members of the bald brigade — hero and villain, male and female.

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Conversing on Comics with Cully Hamner

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The past decade has been good one for Cully Hamner. His creator-owned miniseries Red has served as inspiration for two hit feature films, and he’s found himself in the upper echelon of DC Comics’ talent roster as a cover and interior artist, as well as a character designer for the publisher’s New 52. Now the Alabama-born artist, who recently turned 45, is working on an undisclosed “big” project for DC that will allow him to both draw and co-write, something he’s been wanting to do for years. While he has penned stories for anthologies and one-shots, this will mark his first time writing on a larger scale.

I’ve talked with Hamner for years by email and at conventions, discussing trends in comics, his own work and our shared interest in superhero costume design. After several months of back and forth, I finally caught up with him for this conversation.

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Six by 6 | Six superhero gadgets we’d love to have in real life

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Superheroes aren’t just brawn wrapped it tight-fitting colorful costumes; they have brains, too. Well, some of them, anyway. From the resourcefulness of Batman and the tinkering of Spider-Man to the sheer brainpower of Iron Man and  the futuristic technology of the New Gods, their fictional inventions can put Steve Jobs’ empire to shame.

From Gould to Kirby to Hickman, comics creators have long dreamed up some amazing fictional gadgets; some, like Dick Tracy’s wristwatch, have already come true. Pebble smartwatch. With that in mind, here are six other comic-book inventions that we wish would materialize at Best Buy.

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In ‘Strong Female Protagonist,’ a superhero just wants to be normal

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Do you like your superheroes to be something other than strong, smart and male? Meet Alison Green, aka Mega Girl, star of the webcomic Strong Female Protagonist. Launched in 2012 by writer Brennan Lee Mulligan and artist Molly Ostertag, Strong Female Protagonist chronicles the life of Mega Girl as she attempts to be more than a superhero. As the title suggests, Mulligan and Ostertag are taking the trope and turning it on its head.

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J.H. Williams gets graphic for Blondie’s new album

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One of the common comments when people see the work of J.H. Williams III is that it looks like fine art. It is, and as it turns out he has some fans in Blondie. This week the rock band debuted the packaging for its upcoming album Ghosts of Download, and it features a expansive set of artwork that Williams created exclusively for the release.

“The package design is a unique one, there will be two albums in one package – featuring the Ghosts of Download album along with another album of Blondie’s greatest hits newly recorded, and a deluxe version with all kinds of extra goodies,” he explains on his website. “I did all of the design work for Ghosts, while the Hits portion was done by someone else. I worked on every visual aspect of this release, from concept, to cover design, to booklet design, and all the same for the Vinyl Double LP. There are different pieces or alterations for the CD versus the vinyl, and the same situation for some foreign versions of the release – GO COLLECTORS GO!”

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Six by 6 | Six largely forgotten heroes from Marvel’s Golden Age

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Before Spider-Man, before the Fantastic Four, before even Captain America, Marvel was creating superheroes. Sure, the publisher went by Timely rather than Marvel, but it had costumed heroes — in spades. Some, like Namor, Ka-Zar and the Human Torch, were dusted off years later as memorable guest stars in other books or for trivial flashback appearances, but these veterans of the publisher’s first experiments ith the superhero genre are largely forgotten anecdotes in the publisher’s path to greatness. For some, it’s unfortunate — but for others, it’s perhaps for the best.

In this installment of ROBOT 6′s Six by 6, we cherry-pick six heroes of the late 1930s and early 1940s that didn’t fare as well as Captain America or the Sub-Mariner, and talk about when they have popped up since and why some have never been seen again.

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Sundance’s ‘The Writers’ Room’ to trace path from comics to TV

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Jim Rash, Robert Kirkman and Blair Butler on “The Writer’s Room.”

Comic books have become prime source material for movies, television series and video games, and while the adaptations may vary in terms of scale and medium, one of the keys to their success remains the same: staying true to the core elements that made the comics work in the first place. And in TV, it’s up to the writers — either the original authors or faithful adapters — to help keep it on course.

On April 25, SundanceTV’s The Writers’ Room will explore the well-tread road between comic books and television. Host Jim Rash (screenwriter of The Descendants), the show will put The Walking Dead writer Robert Kirkman and Smallville creators Al Gough and Miles Millar in the hot seat to discuss successfully adapting comics for television. They’ll be joined by industry commentators Blair Butler (formerly of G4TV) and Michael Schneider (TV Guide Magazine).

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French comics sensation Bengal takes aim at U.S. with ‘Naja’

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French artist Bengal is one of those artists whom others go out of their way to find his work. While one of his few U.S. credits is a story in the first Flight anthology from 2004, overseas he’s an established name. Revered for Meka, Luminae and contributions to French anthologies, his work has been available to American audiences by import only — or  by viewing online. But in June, an upstart publisher is bringing Bengal’s work to the United States.

Magnetic Press will release Naja, a 248-page collection of the 2008 series by Bengal and writer JD Morvan, originally published in Europe by Dargaud. Naja follows an assassin immune to pain and emotion who finds herself looking for more when her bosses mark her as their next target.

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