Corey Blake, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Store Tour | Downtown Comics in St. John’s, Newfoundland

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Welcome to Store Tour, ROBOT 6’s weekly exploration of comics shops, and the people who run them; think of it as the retailer version of Shelf Porn. Each Sunday we feature a different store, and also get to know the person behind the register.

To discover a comic store in your area, visit FindAComicShop.com

This week’s stop has the distinction of being the easternmost comics shop in North America, Downtown Comics, located at 141 Duckworth St. in St. John’s, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. We spoke with owner Jason Conway.

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Store Tour | Dragon’s Lair in Austin, Texas

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Welcome to Store Tour, ROBOT 6’s weekly exploration of comics shops, and the people who run them; think of it as the retailer version of Shelf Porn. Each Sunday we feature a different store, and also get to know the person behind the register.

To discover a comic store in your area, visit FindAComicShop.com

This week’s store is Dragon’s Lair Comics and Fantasy, 2438 W. Anderson Lane, Suite B-1, in Austin, Texas. We spoke with creative director Megan Ruch.

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Store Tour | Area 52 in Gainesville, Georgia

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Welcome to Store Tour, ROBOT 6’s weekly exploration of comics shops, and the people who run them; think of it as the retailer version of Shelf Porn. Each Sunday we feature a different store, and also get to know the person behind the register.

To discover a comic store in your area, visit FindAComicShop.com

This week’s store is Area 52 Comics and Games, 3640 Mundy Mill Road, Suite 140 in Gainesville, Georgia; it’s located in the College Square Shopping Center near the University of Northern Georgia. We spoke with manager (and cartoonist) Dean Trippe. Continue Reading »

Store Tour | The Comic Room in Toronto

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Welcome to Store Tour, ROBOT 6’s new weekly exploration of comics shops, and the people who run them. Think of it as the retailer version of Shelf Porn. Each Sunday we’ll feature a different store, and also get to know the person behind the register.

To discover a comic store in your area, visit FindAComicShop.com

This week’s store is The Comic Room, located at 659 McCowan Road in Toronto, Ontario, at the intersection of McCowan and Lawrence Avenue East. We spoke with manager Sean Clement.

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Store Tour | Escape Pod Comics in Huntington Village, New York

EscapePod-top

Welcome to Store Tour, ROBOT 6’s new weekly exploration of comics shops, and the people who run them. Think of it as the retailer version of Shelf Porn. Each Sunday we’ll feature a different store, and also get to know the person behind the register.

To discover a comic store in your area, visit FindAComicShop.com

Today’s store is Escape Pod Comics, located at 302 Main St. in Huntington Village, New York, on the north shore of Long Island. We spoke with co-owner Menachem Luchins.

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Six of the best announcements from Image Expo 2015

paper-girls-teaserImage Expo returned on Thursday, and it wasn’t messing around. Each year, Image Comics seems to pack bigger announcements and bigger surprises into a single-day event. And the diversity of creators and genres gets that much better, too.

This year’s Image Expo — held again at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, following last July’s event at Comic-Con International in San Diego — included the now-standard keynote address by Publisher Eric Stephenson. He reviewed the past year’s successes and echoed plans to make Image the No. 1 publisher, but aside from throwing the gauntlet down at the feet of Marvel and DC, his address avoided some of the controversial statements and manifestos of years past. While I appreciate a good sabre-rattling, it allowed the focus to remain squarely on the creators and their comics.

With that in mind, here are my six favorite announcements from Image Expo 2015:

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Too many superhero movies?

black-panther-concept-8a438It was exciting Tuesday when Marvel Studios unveiled its Phase Three plans, with nine feature films, including Black Panther, starring Chadwick Boseman, and Captain Marvel, featuring the Carol Danvers version. However, amid the enthusiasm, there was some hand-wringing.

Are we about to be oversaturated with superheroes? Is the movie-going public going to get sick of capes and tights? Are superhero movies a fad that will go the way of the Western?

Between Marvel, Warner Bros., Fox and Sony, there are more than 30 superhero movies planned between next year and 2020. An average of five movies a year will be released, peaking in 2016 and 2016, with eight films each. No doubt more announcements will follow as we make our way through the decade.

This hasn’t gone unnoticed. Immediately after Tuesday’s press event, Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige was asked if he was concerned about the increasing number of superhero films. He pointed out that it’s “a challenge we’ve faced for many, many years.”

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Turning viewers into readers

DC-readingIn case you haven’t noticed, people like watching television shows and movies based on comic books.

This fall has been particularly exceptional television adaptations: The Walking Dead season premiere pulled in more than 17 million viewers, while more than 8 million watched the first episode Gotham, making it Fox’s best fall drama debut in 14 years. More than 6 million raced to see The Flash pilot, giving The CW its highest ratings ever. About 5 million are regularly tuning in for Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D., and nearly 3 million for the third season of Arrow.

It’s not limited to live-action series, either: 2 million people watch Teen Titans Go!, and more than 1 million tune in to Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on Nickelodeon.

On the big screen, all four feature films starring Marvel characters — X-Men: Days of Future Past, Guardians of the Galaxy, Captain America: The Winter Soldier and The Amazing Spider-Man 2 — each grossed more than $700 million each worldwide. So far, comic book movies have generated more than $3.8 billion dollars this year. While it’s unknown how many of those dollars are from repeat viewings, that’s still a lot of people.

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East Coast vs. West Coast: NYCC surpasses SDCC

New York Comic Con

New York Comic Con

What a difference a decade makes. New York Comic Con is now North America’s biggest comic book convention, attracting a reported 151,000 people to this year’s event, and surpassing Comic-Con International, which has been forced to cap attendance at about 130,000. In just eight years, producer ReedPOP has managed to surpass what San Diego organizers took 40 years to build.

It may sound like exciting news, but here on the West Coast, we’re crestfallen, heartbroken even. I’ve lived in Los Angeles for nearly 15 years, which virtually makes me a native. The city has a long-running rivalry with New York City, which always goes on about how it’s the best at everything. Well, you can have your best pizzas, but this was ours! OK, sort of. San Diego is close enough to LA to pretend as if Comic-Con International is ours. Let’s face it: Every other part of Southern California is essentially a suburb of Los Angeles, so it’s always been a point of pride that although modern comics were born in New York City, here is where they’re celebrated the loudest and biggest.

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Kirby vs. Marvel settlement: The King’s goal fulfilled

FantasticFourNearly one month after what would’ve been Jack Kirby’s 97th birthday, the announcement was made: Concluding a five-year copyright battle, and decades of contention about credit and compensation, Marvel and the Kirby family revealed Friday that they had reached a settlement, just ahead of a conference to decide whether the U.S. Supreme Court would take up the case.

“Marvel and the family of Jack Kirby have amicably resolved their legal disputes,” they said in a joint statement, “and are looking forward to advancing their shared goal of honoring Mr. Kirby’s significant role in Marvel’s history.”

This is, without question, excellent news, and cause for celebration.

As is typical with settlements, the terms of their agreement aren’t made public, and the one-sentence statement gives no indication of how Kirby’s significant role in Marvel’s history will be honored.

Those close to Kirby’s family have been reserved with details. In some instances, they don’t appear to know any more than we do.

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Cosplayers and the changing convention scene

CCI2014-SatFloor-46-5b244Writer and producer Denise Dorman, wife of artist Dave Dorman, kicked off far-ranging discussion with her recent post about the shifting convention scene, and how it’s affected their income — specifically, her view that cosplayers have become to the “new focus” of the events, to the detriment of creators, publishers and vendors.

It’s certainly true that comics conventions have become more popular and more numerous than ever, and with their success comes an evolving experience both for attendees and exhibitors. However, Dorman’s essay is front-loaded with a lot of perplexed annoyance at kids today and their cosplaying, Instagram and selfies.

Unfortunately, much of the discussion that’s followed so far has focused on defending cosplayers. That was my initial response too — after all, I’ve seen some people wearing elaborate and imaginative costumes walking on the floor with their overflowing bag of comics, or their original art delicately being transported somewhere safe. Plenty of cosplayers love comics, and if they stop at a booth, you can bet people around them are checking out both them and the table they’re perusing. I’ve seen it happen so often at Comic-Con International.

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How about a ‘$1 Per’ campaign for The Hero Initiative?

hero-initiative-logoOver the weekend, I witnessed what has the potential to turn into a grassroots campaign to help one of my favorite charities, The Hero Initiative.

Singaporean author Wayne Rée released his debut book Tales from a Tiny Room at the Singapore Toy, Games and Comic Convention, perhaps not the obvious venue for the introduction of a collection of short stories. Sure, there are accompanying illustrations by several comics artists, and a number of the stories seem ripe for adaptation as comics, but it’s definitely straight prose. Still, Rée chose the convention because comic books have long influenced him. This is not some keen observation; he’s open about it. For about a year, he wrote a series of columns about his journey of discovering comics at The Comics Observer (no relation to this column!).

On Twitter and Tumblr, he frequently cites his love of Spider-Man, Warren Ellis and Jamie S. Rich. He even received permission to use a portion of Matt Fraction’s talk “Batman Dreams of Hieronymus Machines” as the opening quote for Tales from a Tiny Room. And so, as a way to give back to what has given him so much, Rée announced he would donate one Singapore dollar to The Hero Initiative for every copy sold at the convention.

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Marvel’s ‘Big Hero 6′ blackout

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Coming soon (but not from Marvel)

Walt Disney Animation has premiered an adorable two-minute clip from Big Hero 6 that highlights the relationship between young Hiro and his robot Baymax, and has me looking forward to the Nov. 7 release of the film.

Even from the limited glimpses we’ve gotten of them, the characters are already appealing. I sure would be down for reading more stories about them. However, Marvel has no plans to release any comic books in conjunction with the premiere of Big Hero 6 — no reprints of the original stories that inspired from the movie, no new comics … nothing.

As the first Disney animated movie to take advantage of the House of Mouse’s $4 billion purchase of the House of Ideas, you’d think this would be pretty exciting for Marvel, and something it would want to promote. And yet, Marvel is surprisingly quiet about Big Hero 6.

There are no plans to reprint the 1998 original Sunfire & Big Hero 6 miniseries by Scott Lobdell and Gus Vazquez, or the 2006 follow-up Big Hero 6 by Chris Claremont and David Nakayama . Asked about that last week by Comic Book Resources, Marvel Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso explained, “The characters and stories that have appeared in our comics are very different from what they are in the film. Releasing material that would be viewed as movie tie-in product would be a disservice to filmgoers. We wanted the Disney folks to be able to create their own unique style and story, unencumbered by those older stories.”

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Alonso apologizes for mixed messages of Manara’s Spider-Woman cover

spider-woman-manara[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

I was pleased to see Marvel Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso acknowledge concerns over the variant cover by Milo Manara for Spider-Woman #1, and even go so far as to explicitly apologize for the mixed message the cover caused.

“We always listen to fans’ concerns so we can do better by them,” Alonso stated to CBR for Friday’s installment of the weekly Axel-in-Charge interview column. “We want everyone — the widest breadth of fans — to feel welcome to read Spider-Woman. We apologize — I apologize — for the mixed messaging that this variant caused.”

He went on to note that it is not the official cover for the series, and is equally not as representative of the title as a pet variant by Skottie Young might be. That’s a fair point. However, I would argue that there is a difference between a Milo Manara variant and any other random variant. That cover exists within the context of the title character of the comic and the historical depiction of women in comics, if not media in general, juxtaposed with a cartoonist known for erotica being commissioned to provide material for a comic with a T+ rating (13 and above).

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The ‘Genius’ of weekly comics

Genius #5Although U.S. publishers occasionally experiment with weekly series — DC Comics, for examples, will soon have three on its plate, with Batman Eternal, New 52: Futures End and Earth 2: Worlds End — comic books in North America traditionally have been released on a monthly schedule. It’s been that way for decades.

However, today sees the conclusion of weekly miniseries that not only make you reconsider that tradition, but also leads you to wonder whether the story’s impact would have been lessened by monthly release.

Created by writers Marc Bernardin and Adam Freeman and artist Afua Richardson, the five-issue Genius was published weekly throughout August by Top Cow Productions (the final two installments went on sale this morning). This break from the tradition allowed the story to build a momentum that would have been missed had it unfolded over the course of five months.

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