Kevin Melrose, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 3 of 292

Blue Beetle flies into battle in ‘Infinite Crisis’

blue beetle1

WB Games has added yet another champion to the roster of Infinite Crisis, Turbine’s free-to-play multiplayer online battle arena game: Jaime Reyes, the Blue Beetle.

Beginning April 30, Beta testers will be able to play as the fan-favorite character, who in the game world wandered into a dispute between warring superhuman gang and stumbled upon the object they were fighting over: a blue scarab. It, of course, bonded to Jaime, covering his body with battle armor, allowing him to flee to safety. After his escape he learned that while the armor wasn’t permanent, his bond with the scarab is. Check out the Blue Beetle trailer and screenshots below.

Continue Reading »


Jeffy gets existential in ‘Family Circus’/'True Detective’ mashup

flat-circus-new

For two months this winter many of us were swept up in HBO’s True Detective and the serpentine search by detectives Rust Cohle and Marty Hart not only for a serial killer but also for the meaning of life and the nature of good and evil. And while not everyone was satisfied with the ending, most of us remain enthralled with the writing of Nic Pizzolatto and the existential nihilism of Matthew McConaughey’s character.

And now we can experience both again, in a decidedly different form, with Time Is A Flat Circus, which combines dialogue from the crime drama with panels from the long-running comic The Family Circus. It’s as terrific as you imagine.

Continue Reading »

Viz Media to roll out ‘Edge of Tomorrow’ movie tie-ins

AYNIK-GraphicNovel-CoverWith Tom Cruise poised to battle aliens (again and again and again) in Edge of Tomorrow, Viz Media has announced the May 5 release of the graphic novel adaptation of the book that inspired the sci-fi action film.

Written by Hiroshi Sakurazaka and illustrated by alt-manga artist Yoshitoshi ABe, All You Need Is Kill is a 2004 light novel about a new recruit to the United Defense Force who’s killed in his first fight against Earth’s mysterious invaders — only to find himself caught in a time loop: He wakes up the day before that fateful battle, only to die and be resurrected time and again.

Adapted by sci-fi author Nick Mamatas and comic artist Lee Ferguson (Green Arrow, Miranda Mercury), the graphic novel will be available in print for $14.99 or digitally across multiple platforms for $8.99.

On April 29, Viz will also release a new movie tie-in edition of Sakurazaka’s light novel, which in 2009 launched the publisher’s Haikasoru imprint, with a new title (Edge of Tomorrow) and a covering bearing the poster of stars Cruise and Emily Blunt. It’s priced at $7.99.

Continue Reading »

DC teases ‘Futures End’ with new Escher-inspired image

futures-end-teaser-cropped

Timed to coincide with the lunar eclipse, DC Comics last night released a teaser image for its new weekly series that promises, “When Futures End … the Blood Moon Shall Rise!”

Launching with a zero issue on May 3 as part of Free Comic Book Day, Futures End propels the New 52 storylines ahead five years for an exploration of the nature of heroism as well the past, present and, yes, future of the DC Universe. The series is written by Brian Azzarello, Keith Giffen, Dan Jurgens and Jeff Lemire, with a roster of artists that includes Ryan Sook, Ethan Van Sciver, Jesus Merino, Aaron Lopresti, Jurgens and Giffen.

Continue Reading »


‘If there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman’

Falcon Halloween costume

Falcon Halloween costume

“When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, ‘Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.’ That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that. There’s so many of these little people out here doing awful things for money in the world of being famous. And little girls see that. They should have the opposite spectrum of that to look up to.”

Captain America: The Winter Soldier star Anthony Mackie, discussing playing the Falcon, and the need for more representation of women and minorities in superhero movies

Jeff Smith’s ‘Bone’ among most challenged books of 2013

Bone: Out From BonevilleBone, Jeff Smith’s critically acclaimed fantasy adventure about three cousins swept up in epic populated by dragons, rat creatures and evil forces, was among the books most frequently challenged last year in schools and libraries.

The news comes from the American Library Association’s Office for Intellectual Freedom, which has released its annual Top 10 List of Frequently Challenged Books as part of National Library Week. In 2013, the organization received 307 reports on attempts to remove or restrict materials from library bookshelves and school curricula across the United States. That’s down from 464 official challenges in 2012.

Bone came in at No. 10 on the list, which was led once again by Dav Pilkey’s Captain Underpants series and populated by the likes of Suzanne Collins’ The Hunger Games, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eyes and Stephen Chbosky’s The Perks of Being a Wallflower (see the full rundown below). The last comic to make the list was Kim Dong Hwa’s The Color of Earth in 2011.

The ALA’s 2014 State of American Libraries Report doesn’t cite specific challenges to Bone or reveal how many there have been, but it does offer broad reasons for the objections: “political viewpoint, racism, violence.”

Although the challenges last year apparently failed to attract media attention, there was a good deal of coverage of complaint filed in 2010 by a parent in suburban Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, objecting to the depictions of drinking, smoking, gambling and sexual situations in Bone. However, a school district committee voted 10-1 to keep the books on library shelves. (There’s a Comic Book Legal Defense Fund case study, if you’re interested.)

Continue Reading »

DC and Marvel take defense of ‘super hero’ trademark to U.K.

business zero to superheroA British author is accusing DC Comics and Marvel of “banning the use of the word superhero” after he received notice that the publishers are opposing his attempt to trademark the title of his advice book Business Zero to Superhero.

“I was very shocked,” Graham Jules told BBC Radio. “I’m a new author and small business, and I’m now in the position of fighting or scrapping the entire book.” The Mail on Sunday picked up on his story, running it with a headline that’s both cliche and misleading: “Zap! You can’t say ‘superhero’.”

As many comics fans know, and Jules quickly learned, DC and Marvel have since 1979 jointly owned the trademark for “super hero” and “super heroes,” covering a range of products, from comic books and playing cards to pencil sharpeners and glue. Their renewal of that mark in 2006 drew widespread attention, as well as scrutiny from those who question whether such a term should be allowed to be registered.

Continue Reading »


‘Deadpool’ #27 sets Guinness record you didn’t know existed

Deadpool.27.Cover

Readers who have already stopped by their local comic store today may have noticed that the cover of Marvel’s Deadpool #27, the special wedding issue, includes a little something extra: a seal certifying it as a Guinness World Records record holder.

The wraparound cover by Scott Koblish and Val Staples, featuring 232 denizens of the Marvel Universe gathered for Wade Wilson’s wedding, has set the record for the most comic book characters on a single issue cover. Guinness found that 224 of those characters were publicly familiar enough to qualify for the recognition. Alas, there’s no mention of which eight didn’t make the cut.

Continue Reading »

Joe Quinones teases ‘Black Canary and Zatanna: Bloodspell’

bloodspell1

If you aren’t following the blog of artist Joe Quinones (FF, Wednesday Comics), then you’re missing out on some terrific glimpses of Black Canary and Zatanna: Bloodspell, the long-awaited graphic novel written by Paul Dini.

Each Wednesday for the past month, Quinones has revealed one or two panels from the book, some more complete than others, as he counts down to the planned May 21 release.

Continue Reading »

‘Hate’ & ‘Meat Cake’ debut on comiXology (with free first issues)

hate1To mark the digital debut of Peter Bagge’s Hate and Dame Darcy’s Meat Cake, Fantagraphics Books and comiXology are offering the first issues of both series for free for a limited time.

First published in 1990, Hate chronicles the life of Bagge’s longtime protagonist Buddy Bradley, a malcontent who comes of age in the Seattle grunge scene before moving back to suburban New Jersey and his dysfunctional family. One of the bestselling alternative comics of the ’90s, Hate ran for 30 issues; Bagge resurrected the title in 2000 for a series of Hate Annuals. A Hate follow-up, Buddy Buys a Dump, is planned for release in June.

Published by Fantagraphics since 1993, Darcy’s Meat Cake delves into a neo-Victorian world of humor, romance and frequently tragic fairy tales featuring such characters as Effluvia the Mermaid, the roguish roué Wax Wolf, Igpay the Pig-Latin pig and Stregapez, who speaks by dispensing Pez-like tablets through a hole in her throat.

“Debuting Hate and Meat Cake digitally on comiXology marks a new era for these historic Fantagraphics titles,” Fantagraphics Associate Publisher Eric Reynolds said in a statement. “Although the trade paperbacks collecting these works are perennial classics, this marks the first time that the single issues of these generation-defining classics have been widely available in well over a decade. Now with comiXology’s help, readers around the world will be able to experience them anew and discover just what makes these books so timelessly great.”

Quote of the day | Timeless, and subversive, Riverdale

live with archie-alex ross“I have a fleece that I wear that has an Archie patch on it, and everywhere I go people will stop me and say ‘Archie, I love Archie!’ I think the teen years are such a universal experience — people are either going through it, looking forward to going through it, not looking forward to going through it, went through hell in high school, loved their high school experience — and somehow Archie and his adventures capture all that. I went to an all-boys prep school and had a pretty good high school experience, I would say, but there’s always something about those stories where I always wished I went to Riverdale High. And I wish I was part of that kind of gang of friends. I don’t know why. But there was something really comforting about it. I also always thought there was something subversive about the brand. I always felt like there was stuff happening right to the right or the left of the panels, and I was always interested in what those stories were.”

– Archie Comics Chief Creative Officer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa,
on the enduring appeal of the Riverdale gang

‘Blue Estate’ rail shooter announced for PS4 and Xbox One

blue estate1

The “darkly funny” video game based on the crime comedy Blue Estate will also arrive for PlayStation 4 and Xbox One.

Announced in September for PC, the rail shooter by French indie studio HeSaw and Focus Home Interactive is inspired by the 12-issue Image Comics series created by Viktor Kalvachev (now creative director of HeSaw), and featuring art by Kalvachev, Toby Cypress, Nathan Fox, Robert Valley and others.

Continue Reading »

Papercutz’s ‘Ninjago’ line passes 2 million in sales

ninjago-v9It’s easy to become so wrapped up in the monthly direct market horse race that we overlook success stories in other channels. Oh, not the bookstore performances of The Walking Dead, Saga or Attack on Titan; we get regular reminders of that from BookScan. In this case we’re talking about Ninjago, the LEGO toy line turned animated TV series turned graphic novel line.

Although the debut of the latest book atop The New York Times bestseller list should’ve provided a clue to how well it’s doing, Papercutz has trumpeted that with the release of LEGO Ninjago, Vol. 9: Night of the Nindroids, the series has surpassed 2 million copies in sales.

LEGO Ninjago titles have been a phenomenon for us,” Papercutz President Terry Nantier said in a statement. “We’ve been back to press numerous times and it seems like we’re always struggling to keep up with consumer demand. I’ve been in the graphic novel publishing business for quite some time and I’d be hard pressed to name a lot of other kids ‘series that have hit that level of sales.”

Things are going so well that the publisher, perhaps unsurprisingly, is expanding the line in May with a series of graphic novels based on Ninjago “Legends of Chima” LEGO sets.

Oni splits with vendor over ties to anti-marriage equality group

oni logoOni Press has ended its business relationship with packaging supply company Uline over its CEO’s financial support of an Illinois group that went to “unseemly lengths” last year to try to block passage of that state’s marriage-equality bill.

In a letter signed by a dozen employees and posted Tuesday on its blog, the Portland, Oregon-based publisher explained that, “While our professional relationship with Uline has been a prosperous one, the fact that Family-PAC is funded in part by Uline’s CEO [Richard] Uihlein, is information we simply cannot abide or ignore.”

The Chicago-based Family-PAC, which describes itself as “the leading pro-family, anti-tax political action committee in Illinois,” was behind robocalls that targeted state Rep. Mike Smiddy for accepting $6,500 in donations from “Chicago homosexuals” and decried the alleged negative effects same-sex marriages have on children.

Continue Reading »

Osamu Tezuka exhibit added to Google Cultural Institute

Osamu Tezuka in 1959

Osamu Tezuka in 1959

The Google Cultural Institute has compiled images, videos and documents for an exhibit on Osamu Tezuka, marking the first time a manga artist has been featured in the digital historical archive.

Launched in 2011, the initiative is “an effort to make important cultural material available and accessible to everyone and to digitally preserve it to educate and inspire future generations.” With the participation of 40 institutions in 14 countries, the Google Cultural Institute offers free access to photographs, footage and documents from historical events and figures of the 20th century.

According to Asahi Shimbun, the Tezuka exhibit was added to the “Cultural Figures” section on Monday, the fiction birthday of Astro Boy. The collection consists of 172 images, video and text pieces from Tezuka Productions and the Osamu Tezuka Manga Museum.

“Tezuka repeatedly expressed his opposition to war and discrimination and emphasized the preciousness of life through his works,” said Yoshihiro Shimizu, chief of the copyright business division of Tokyo-based Tezuka Productions. “I am happy that information concerning Tezuka is spread around the globe (through the site) and his ideas are shared.”

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives