Tim O'Shea, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Download a collection of Jason Latour’s life drawings for free

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At this stage of his career, Jason Latour is respected equally for his writing (12 Gauge’s Loose Ends; Marvel’s Wolverine and the X-Men and the upcoming Spider-Gwen) and his art (too many to list, but most recently and notably his collaboration with Jason Aaron on Image’s Southern Bastards).

And on Thursday my fellow Southerner revealed a healthy dose of our region’s patented hospitality by offering fans a free download of Erase (Erase), his 42-page collection of life drawings and studies from 2006 to 2011.

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Creative process: Gibbons and Goellner’s ‘Birch Squatch’ #1

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Beginning today, writer Jim Gibbons and artist Caleb Goellner‘s Birch Squatch: The Last Bigfoot #1 (which premiered digitally in mid-September on Gumroad) is available on comiXology for 99 cents. To mark the occasion, Goellner shared with ROBOT 6 a glimpse into the creative process through a series of images.

The comic, about a legendary figure driven out of the woods by rampant development, is definitely worth a read.

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Take a gander at Chris Schweizer’s October monster drawings

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For this month, Chris Schweizer, creator of Crogan Adventures and the upcoming all-ages graphic novel series The Creeps, is entertaining fans as well as himself with October Monster Drawings, which he is sharing on his myriad social media platforms, including Tumblr.

Noticing he’d reached his 17th piece the other day, I reached out to Schweizer to see whether we could share some of them here, and also get his perspective on what prompted him to do them in the first place. While he happily gave ROBOT 6 his approval to run a few, I heartily recommend you go check out the originals — and the entertaining text he provides with several pieces.

Here’s what he had to say about the Monster Drawings:

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Haunt the Fantagraphics Halloween sale for bargains

Peculia and the Groon Grove Vampires by Richard Sala

Peculia and the Groon Grove Vampires by Richard Sala

In the spirit of the Halloween season, Fantagraphics has compiled a weeklong sale on more than 25 of its horror titles discounted from 25 percent to 30 percent.

As with all of the Fantagraphics holdings, it’s an eclectic mix with a variety of gems for folks to consider. Consider the Jacob Covey-curated Beasts! Book 1, with work from more than 80 artists. As ROBOT 6’s Michael May noted in his 2010 review, “He [Covey] didn’t edit the book; he curated it like a museum exhibition. The book’s Introduction further reinforces that notion. It reads like a program, with a definition of cryptozoology and notes about the artists, the creatures they selected, and the approach the curator took in putting the collection together. It also shares interesting facts, points out easily missed elements of the book’s design, and even suggests the best way for ‘the enthusiastic reader’ to experience what’s to come. In other words, it’s not only a program; it’s a tour guide.”

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Welcome back to Priest & Bright’s Quantum & Woody

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Really I toyed with the idea of merely posting: “Christopher J. Priest and M.D. Bright are together again: what more needs to be written?” But the return of these two creators to comics in particular deserves more discussion than just one sentence. This week marked the release of the first installment in the five-issue miniseries, Q2: The Return of Quantum & Woody #1.

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Eleanor Davis holds 17-hour fundraiser for friend’s wheelchair van

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On Friday, How to Be Happy creator Eleanor Davis embarked on a 17-hour drawing marathon to raise money for her friend Kyle Coldwell (“a 23-year-old Phoenix, Arizona, resident with a severe congenital condition called Spinal Muscular Atrophy [SMA]“), who is the midst of a $10,000 GoFundMe campaign for funds to repair or replace his wheelchair van.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Steve Ekstrom on ‘Cannibal Island’

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I consider myself fairly well-versed in large-scale atrocities. So I was surprised to discover I was unaware of 1933’s Nazino affair until last week, when writer Steve Ekstrom launched his webcomic Cannibal Island.

To learn more about his new collaboration with artist Dionysios, I reached out to him with a few questions. The webcomic gave readers seven pages last week and will return with new installments on Oct. 15, 22 and 29 (along with a bonus surprise on Oct. 31).

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GENERATE: 24 hours of comics at SCAD Atlanta

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This past Friday, Pat Quinn, SCAD Atlanta Associate Chair of Sequential Art, invited me to observe GENERATE, the school’s version of 24-hour comic day. (SCAD calls it GENERATE to allow any other of the school’s departments that wants to participate can do their own 24-hour challenge). The event kicked off at 10 AM on Friday. Students participating in GENERATE are challenged to create a 24 page black and white print ready comic in 24 hours from a blank slate. This year, they introduced an option for students to form a team to produce the book, those who chose that option had to also color the comic.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Neil Kleid on ‘Spider-Man: Kraven’s Last Hunt’

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One of the most memorable Spider-Man storylines of the 1980s remains J.M. DeMatteis and Mike Zeck’s “Kraven’s Last Hunt,” which featured the ultimate battle between Kraven the Hunter and Spider-Man. Now, nearly three decades later, Marvel has enlisted Neil Kleid to author a prose adaptation, Spider-Man: Kraven’s Last Hunt.

To mark the novel’s release today in comic stores, Kleid talked with me about the nuances of the adaptation. He’ll appear today at 6 p.m. for a book signing at JHU Comic Books in New York City.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Ted Naifeh on ‘Princess Ugg’

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With the release last week of Princess Ugg #4, writer/artist Ted Naifeh cleared some time in his schedule to discuss the ongoing Oni Press series. After years spent with Courtney Crumrin, the creator moves into new territory by combining barbarian adventure with a princess finishing school to create a social satire/adventure tale.

While I had read the first few issues in preparation for our discussion, I have to admit I was pleasantly surprised to learn Naifeh created the character out of a desire to “play with Frazetta-style barbarian fantasy.” That turns out to be just one aspect of his work I was delighted to learn about, has his candor about the creator/editor dynamics also proved informative.

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Seth Kushner goes home

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Since his Myeloid Acute Leukemia diagnosis in April, I have been following Seth Kushner’s arduous medical journey. The various rounds of chemotherapy did not seem to be the hardest part of the experience for the photographer/comics writer. For him, the biggest hardship (other than the fight for his life, of course) was the fact that his frequent bouts of hospitalization for treatments kept him away from his home with his wife, Terra, and their young son.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Dustin Weaver on ‘Edge of Spider-Verse’ #3

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Anyone who read my Best of 7 piece from Sunday on Edge of Spider-Verse #2 likely got the impression I’m eager to see more about the Spider-folks from other universes. On Wednesday readers will get a chance to read Dustin Weaver‘s Edge of Spider-Verse #3 starring Dr. Aaron Aikman, Spider-Man.

Weaver chatted with me about the one-shot he wrote, drew and colored for Marvel, and afterward we turned to his ongoing webcomics Sagittarius A* and Amnia Cycle.

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It’s great to have a new George Pérez comic to read

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Any week there is a new George Pérez comic to read calls for a celebration.  What pleases me is that this story is not rooted in corporate comics continuity; rather the esteemed writer/artist has jumped head first into stories with his own new characters–something he clearly relishes. What also pleases me so is that the man still hungers to tell new tales, rather than spend his free time (post recent eye surgery) pursuing his love of theater/acting or just basking in the glow of an incredible career. As he noted in a recent CBR interview: “I will never regret any of my time working for DC and Marvel, especially in light of the fact that, especially with DC, I have been earning considerable money in royalties that allows me the option of not drawing comics at all if I were crazy enough to consider that.”

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The eyes are the jackpot on the new Spider-Gwen costume

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As a huge Jason Latour fan I give him credit on the marketing front; he successfully pumped many folks (including myself) to be quite enthused about  Edge of Spider-Verse #2 featuring another universe’s Gwen Stacy as Spider-Woman.

But when I finally got the issue, what surprised me is the aspect I loved most about the series. Despite the fact it is a universe where Gwen’s father is very much alive (and many other engaging narrative aspects–including a potentially very different kind of Matt Murdock)–it is the eyes of the Spider-Woman costume that really proved to be my favorite part. This may surprise, but let me explain.

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Return of ‘Stumptown’ makes me miss James Garner a little less

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[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

The manner in which a comic series resonates with me often lacks sense. In the case of the launch of Greg Rucka and Matthew Southworth’s Stumptown, I distinctly remember  a mid-2007 CBR article where Rucka described it as “my love letter to ‘The Rockford Files.'” From that moment on, I have been a huge fan of Stumptown.

Portland private investigator Dex Parios is not a perfect character; investigations rarely go smoothly for her. But she always succeeds on some level. Her family is important to her, more exactly her special needs brother Ansel Parios means the world to her. For me, the value of family is another homage to the James Garner 1970s series.

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