Tim O'Shea, Author at Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources - Page 3 of 28

Talking Comics with Tim | Neil Kleid on ‘Spider-Man: Kraven’s Last Hunt’

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One of the most memorable Spider-Man storylines of the 1980s remains J.M. DeMatteis and Mike Zeck’s “Kraven’s Last Hunt,” which featured the ultimate battle between Kraven the Hunter and Spider-Man. Now, nearly three decades later, Marvel has enlisted Neil Kleid to author a prose adaptation, Spider-Man: Kraven’s Last Hunt.

To mark the novel’s release today in comic stores, Kleid talked with me about the nuances of the adaptation. He’ll appear today at 6 p.m. for a book signing at JHU Comic Books in New York City.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Ted Naifeh on ‘Princess Ugg’

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With the release last week of Princess Ugg #4, writer/artist Ted Naifeh cleared some time in his schedule to discuss the ongoing Oni Press series. After years spent with Courtney Crumrin, the creator moves into new territory by combining barbarian adventure with a princess finishing school to create a social satire/adventure tale.

While I had read the first few issues in preparation for our discussion, I have to admit I was pleasantly surprised to learn Naifeh created the character out of a desire to “play with Frazetta-style barbarian fantasy.” That turns out to be just one aspect of his work I was delighted to learn about, has his candor about the creator/editor dynamics also proved informative.

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Seth Kushner goes home

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Since his Myeloid Acute Leukemia diagnosis in April, I have been following Seth Kushner’s arduous medical journey. The various rounds of chemotherapy did not seem to be the hardest part of the experience for the photographer/comics writer. For him, the biggest hardship (other than the fight for his life, of course) was the fact that his frequent bouts of hospitalization for treatments kept him away from his home with his wife, Terra, and their young son.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Dustin Weaver on ‘Edge of Spider-Verse’ #3

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Anyone who read my Best of 7 piece from Sunday on Edge of Spider-Verse #2 likely got the impression I’m eager to see more about the Spider-folks from other universes. On Wednesday readers will get a chance to read Dustin Weaver‘s Edge of Spider-Verse #3 starring Dr. Aaron Aikman, Spider-Man.

Weaver chatted with me about the one-shot he wrote, drew and colored for Marvel, and afterward we turned to his ongoing webcomics Sagittarius A* and Amnia Cycle.

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It’s great to have a new George Pérez comic to read

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Any week there is a new George Pérez comic to read calls for a celebration.  What pleases me is that this story is not rooted in corporate comics continuity; rather the esteemed writer/artist has jumped head first into stories with his own new characters–something he clearly relishes. What also pleases me so is that the man still hungers to tell new tales, rather than spend his free time (post recent eye surgery) pursuing his love of theater/acting or just basking in the glow of an incredible career. As he noted in a recent CBR interview: “I will never regret any of my time working for DC and Marvel, especially in light of the fact that, especially with DC, I have been earning considerable money in royalties that allows me the option of not drawing comics at all if I were crazy enough to consider that.”

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The eyes are the jackpot on the new Spider-Gwen costume

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As a huge Jason Latour fan I give him credit on the marketing front; he successfully pumped many folks (including myself) to be quite enthused about  Edge of Spider-Verse #2 featuring another universe’s Gwen Stacy as Spider-Woman.

But when I finally got the issue, what surprised me is the aspect I loved most about the series. Despite the fact it is a universe where Gwen’s father is very much alive (and many other engaging narrative aspects–including a potentially very different kind of Matt Murdock)–it is the eyes of the Spider-Woman costume that really proved to be my favorite part. This may surprise, but let me explain.

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Return of ‘Stumptown’ makes me miss James Garner a little less

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[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

The manner in which a comic series resonates with me often lacks sense. In the case of the launch of Greg Rucka and Matthew Southworth’s Stumptown, I distinctly remember  a mid-2007 CBR article where Rucka described it as “my love letter to ‘The Rockford Files.'” From that moment on, I have been a huge fan of Stumptown.

Portland private investigator Dex Parios is not a perfect character; investigations rarely go smoothly for her. But she always succeeds on some level. Her family is important to her, more exactly her special needs brother Ansel Parios means the world to her. For me, the value of family is another homage to the James Garner 1970s series.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Sam Henderson on ‘Magic Whistle’

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In early August, in the wake of Mike Dawson’s conversation-starting essay, Magic Whistle creator Sam Henderson assessed the mitigating factors affecting his work as a cartoonist, laid many of the challenges at his own feet. As refreshing as it was to read a candid assessment of his creative plight, I was curious to learn Henderson’s mindset after people he responded to his post. While I was at it, of course, I angled to get a glimpse of his creative process.

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In ‘Southern Bastards,’ Aaron & Latour write a love letter to the South

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[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

This week saw the first arc of Jason Aaron and Jason Latour‘s Southern Bastards wrap with the release of issue #4. After spending the past three issues laying the foundation for lead character Earl Tubb to confront Dixie Mafia (and football coach) Boss, readers get what they want–and much much more.

As a native of the South (born, raised and still live in Atlanta), I have a deep appreciation for the story the Jasons aim to tell. It is 2014, but as a man who has sat in traffic in a metropolitan Southern city and witnessed a teenager driving a pickup truck with a giant Confederate flag waving from a pole in his truck bed can tell you, not everyone cares what year it is. It is 2014, but AutoTrader recruited Bo and Luke Duke to sell their new phone-app based platform. Right or wrong, those characters likely typify the South for many people who have never lived here. I think while some of my fellow Southerners live in and relish the wrongheaded trappings of the past (and yet, no, I am not calling the Dukes of Hazard racist), many folks are like me, proud of being from the South, but with no desire to rehash why and how the Civil War was fought. In 2014, there is no such thing as a typical Southerner. Thankfully, there is diversity in the 2014 South.

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Pires reaches the final leg of his music trilogy

Pop-banner[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

It’s intriguing to see writer Curt Pires reach the third leg of his music trilogy, Pop (the first two legs were LP and Theremin). When I interviewed Pires about LP nearly two years ago, it was a project he self-published. So I was immensely pleased to see that the recognition of Pires’ talent had grown since that first leg to the point Dark Horse is publishing this new four-issue limited series.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Jimmy Palmiotti on ‘Sex and Violence Vol. 2′

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It surprised me to see Jimmy Palmiotti pursuing yet another Kickstarter in 2014, considering he had successfully completed one earlier in the year for Denver. This new one, launched this week, focuses on Sex and Violence Vol. 2.

My decision to interview the veteran writer wasn’t based on aiming to help him achieve his Kickstarter goal; he’s days, if not hours, away from achieving that. Instead, I hoped to tap into some of the knowledge that allows him to so effectively operate crowdfunding campaigns (many of the completed projects can be bought at the PaperFilms shop).

Not only did the creator offer some of the lessons learned from his past Kickstarters (hint: avoid the shipping costs from hardcover), but he also proved quite candid about the challenges of swimming in creator-owned waters. Palmiotti also was willing to elaborate about his perspective on last week’s controversy about Milo Manara Spider-Woman #1 variant cover.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Scheidt & Smiley on ‘Spooky Sleepover’

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To my mind, there can never be enough all-ages comics. By all-ages, I mean comics that resonate and entertain folks of, well, all ages, not just children. So I was intrigued to learn that writer Dave Scheidt and artist Jess Smart Smiley launched a Kickstarter campaign for an all-ages horror/comedy collection of three stories, Spooky Sleepover.

Scheidt and Smiley were more than happy to explain their love of all-ages storytelling.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Jesse Jacobs on ‘Safari Honeymoon’

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It is fair to say a newlywed couple experiences a honeymoon like no other, on myriad life-changing levels, in writer/artist Jesse Jacobs‘ new Koyama Press book Safari Honeymoon — and jungle madness is only the beginning of what transpires. Jacobs’ art belies any description that accurately conveys the complexity and intoxicating absurdity of his work.

In this interview, I gain insight into his creative approach, among other areas of interest.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Will Sliney on ‘Spider-Man 2099′

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Having covered comics for a number of years, I always appreciate encountering a storyteller excited about pursuing what they hope is a major milestones in a long, successful career. That’s the impression I got while interviewing Ireland-based artist Will Sliney about his big break as the regular artist on the new ongoing Spider-Man 2099.

I was so focused on discussing his new series, I neglected to congratulate and him on being named Cork Person of the Month in July (Sliney hails from Ballycotton in East Cork).

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Dawson initiates larger constructive discussion

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[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

When writer/artist Mike Dawson shared how weakly his graphic novels sold (as part of a larger self-examination of where his comics career currently stands), it struck a chord with a variety of industry members and pundits.

A great deal of attention was paid to the perceived tone of Abhay Khosla’s initial response to Dawson. I have to admit I struggle to read Khosla’s essays with any regularity, as I never feel like he is writing as himself, but rather is projecting an exaggerated version of himself. He is a lawyer by profession, so I have always assumed his comics coverage is a way to write about a medium he clearly loves, but also to burn off some of the tension of his legal work (pure speculation on my part, admittedly). That being said, Khosla’s tone (whether it clicks with you or not) makes some valid points.

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