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Popeye the Sailor Man meets Sailor Moon in Fred Perry mashup

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If you ever wondered what might happen if you were to combine Sailor Moon and Popeye the Sailor Man, Gold Digger cartoonist Fred Perry may have the answer. However, his mashup, titled Momeye the Sailor Scout, isn’t merely a one-off illustration — it’s a full-fledged comic coming soon from Antarctic Press.

Scheduled for August release, Momeye the Sailor Scout mixes Sailor Moon‘s Usagi Tsukino with E.C. Segar’s Popeye in a homage/parody that, according to the publisher, is “not just gender-bent, it’s gender punched through the ceiling!” Whereas Popeye gets his strength from spinach, Momeye gets hers from avocados — and she’ll need it, as she’ll be up against her “best frenemy,” Bruta.

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Forget Tony Stark’s fortune: Black Panther is richest superhero

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Speaking of billionaire heroes: U.K. loan site Buddy Loans has employed scientific research (Wikipedia, Marvel.com, etc.) to arrive at a rundown of “The World’s Richest Superheroes” … which also includes villains. But never mind that: It’s actually a pretty fun chart that’s topped by not Bruce Wayne or Lex Luthor, but rather by Black Panther, whose estimated worth of $500 billion – billion — leaves everyone else in his dust.

As king of Wakanda (not “Wakanada”) T’Challa controls the world’s supply of Vibranium, which accounts for most of his wealth. By contrast, fellow head of state Victor Von Doom possesses only about $35 billion; on the plus side, he also has his own time machine and robot army, so maybe it all evens out.

Bow before Doom’s entry below, and see the rest at Buddy Loans.

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‘Supernatural’ actor Osric Chau guest stars in ‘Red Sonja’ #10

Osric Chau

Osric Chau

Fans of The CW’s Supernatural television series will recognize Osric Chau as Kevin Tran, the honor student turned prophet of God who helped Sam and Dean translate various tablets of significant importance and had to deal with an overprotective mom.

Now the actor, who also appeared in The Man with the Iron Fists and Fun Size, is making the jump from the screen to the printed page, as his likeness will be used for a character in Red Sonja #10.

Red Sonja writer Gail Simone shared some artwork from the comic on her Tumblr, showing Chau in action as “the greatest swordsman in the entire world”:

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Chinese comic adaptation of ‘Star Wars’ is wonderfully surreal

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As weird as Marvel’s 1977 adaptation of Star Wars was with its off-model Darth Vader and unrecognizable Jabba the Hutt, it has nothing — nothing! — on a bizarre, unlicensed version published some three years later in China.

Discovered by historian Maggie Greene, the adaptation doesn’t much resemble a comic book as we know them; instead, there’s one panel per page, with some text. Greene notes that Star Wars had been released in Hong Kong about two years earlier, which she presumes is “where the ‘libretto’ and stills, etc. came from.” However, she writes, “it seems pretty obvious from the drawings that the artists weren’t always working from an actual film, or really much at all.”

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New comic aims to dispel ‘Comic Book Guy’ retailer stereotype

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Every week new comics appear in stores worldwide, and soon a comic will explore how one of the stores came to be.

In the upcoming one-shot comic Number One, writer Gary Scott Beatty and artist Aaron Warner look behind the counter and into the world of comics retailing. Number One follows a budding comics fan named Steve as he transitions from reader to retailer. In a statement, Beatty said the stereotype of comic retailers is “distorted,” and he’s hoping to change that.

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‘Scriptnotes’ co-host clarifies his ‘Slut-Hulk’ comments

she-hulk3While comics fans — joined by none other than Stan Lee himself — line up to lambast screenwriter David S. Goyer for his recent podcast comments about She-Hulk, Scriptnotes co-host Craig Mazin has stepped forward to clarify his own remarks, insisting, “I wasn’t saying that I think she’s a slut.”

Goyer, the writer of Man of Steel and the upcoming sequel Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice, sparked controversy by asserting that She-Hulk was created as “a giant green porn star that only the Hulk could fuck.” However, Mazin has also been criticized for suggesting, “The real name for She-Hulk was Slut-Hulk. [...] The whole point of She-Hulk was just to appeal sexistly to 10-year-old boys. Worked on me.”

Writing Thursday on the Scripnotes blog, Mazin emphasized that he “used the word ‘sexist’ in the podcast,” and explained, “I said this because I believe it. Unlike the Hulk, whose appeal was clearly divorced from any kind of normative standard of physical beauty, She-Hulk was initially drawn (and consistently drawn for many years) as slender, long-legged and large-breasted with flowing locks. Her face was the same old media-model-pretty version we see time and time again.”

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Stan Lee responds to David Goyer’s She-Hulk remarks

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Stan Lee scoffs at screenwriter David S. Goyer’s suggestion that She-Hulk was created as “a giant green porn star that only the Hulk could fuck,” responding that, “Only a nut would even think of that.”

“Never for an instant did I want her as a love interest for Hulk,” Lee, who with artist John Buscema introduced She-Hulk in 1980 as Bruce Banner’s cousin, told The Washington Post.

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Goyer compares She-Hulk to a porn star, calls Martian Manhunter goofy

DBetween movies, comic books and TV, Man of Steel screenwriter David S. Goyer has written quite a few superheroes in his career. On the latest episode of the Scriptnotes podcast, he made his feelings for two of them clear — Marvel’s She-Hulk and DC Comics’ Martian Manhunter — and upset quite a few fans in the process.

In an episode recorded last week in front of an audience at the Writers Guild Theater in Beverly Hills, Scriptnotes hosts John August and Craig Mazin asked their guests — Goyer, “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” screenwriters Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely and “Legend of Conan” writer Andrea Berloff — to play a game where they randomly drew a name of a superhero, and disclosed how they would handle a contemporary film adaptation of that character.

Around 33 minutes into the podcast (full episode here), the conversation moved to She-Hulk, with Markus stating that the character has “the worst, most demeaning character name possible,” due to being presented as only a female adjunct to Hulk. That led to co-host Mazin calling the character “Slut-Hulk,” and Goyer describing her as “pretty chunky” and similar in stature to former WWF performer Chyna. Goyer then elaborated on his thoughts of the character, including describing her as a “giant green porn star.” Here’s the full quote:

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Ed Piskor channels Rob Liefeld for his take on that ’90s Levi’s ad

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I can’t think of a better way to close out the day than with an adaptation of the Spike Lee-directed 1990 Levi’s commercial featuring a young Rob Liefeld, as drawn by Ed Piskor … channeling Rob Liefeld.

It’s an excerpt from Hip Hop Family Tree Vols. 1-2: 1975-1983 Box Set, which collects the first two volumes of Piskor’s bestselling chronicle of the history of hip hop, originally serialized on BoingBoing. It’s due in November from Fantagraphics, which describes it as “the ’90s-est.” You don’t get much more ’90s than that Levi’s commercial.

Check out the full strip at BoingBoing, and watch the original TV ad below.

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‘Lumberjanes’ gets promoted to ongoing series

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Lumberjanes, the critically acclaimed BOOM! Studios comic by Noelle Stevenson, Grace Ellis, Brooke Allen and Shannon Watters, has been upgraded to an ongoing series.

Announced as an eight-issue miniseries from the publisher’s fledgling BOOM! Box imprint, Lumberjanes centers on five teen girls — Jo, April, Mal, Molly and Ripley — who head off to summer camp, only to be faced with monsters in the woods and a mystery that puts the whole world at risk.

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This is the way Wolverine ends: Not with a bang but a hologram

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When Marvel sends Logan to meet his maker in September, it will do so in grand style — grand ’90s style — with a “Weapon Etched Holo Foil” cover for each of the four issues in the Death of Wolverine miniseries. If nothing else, you have to give the publisher credit for “Weapon Etched.” (Get it?)

“When Steve McNiven first turned in his cover to Death of Wolverine #1, we knew we had something special in our hands,” Executive Editor Mike Marts said in a statement. “A cover for the ages. What better way to celebrate this special cover than by giving it the special treatment. Just the other day I saw the process involved in creating this amazing cover — it’s really beautiful. It’s a fantastic way to enhance and showcase this spectacular cover that Steve has drawn.”

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Jeff Smith’s ‘Tüki’ will be published in full color

tukiOriginally solicited as black and white, the print edition of Jeff Smith’s Tüki: Save the Humans will instead be released in full color at the same $3.99 cover price.

According to the cartoonist, readers of the webcomic, which features gorgeous colors by Tom Gaadt, have been lobbying for the same treatment in print. “That’s what I hear over and over while I’m on the road at comic shows,” Smith said in a statement. “To which I say: It’s on!”

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Before there were comic books, there were medieval manuscripts

From the Holkham Bible Picture Book

From the Holkham Bible Picture Book

Using the British Library’s “Comics Unmasked” exhibition as a springboard, the Department of History and Classics delves deep into history for a selection of medieval manuscripts that could certainly be considered as early comic strips.

The library’s Medieval and Early Manuscripts Blog gives a shoutout to the 11th-century Bayeux Tapestry, characterized by Bryan Talbot and others as “the first known British comic strip,” but the curators don’t stop there. For instance, there’s the Holkham Bible Picture Book (1327-1335), with its beautifully colored sequences from both the Old and New Testament, which is “sometimes described as England’s first graphic novel.” Julian Harrison, the library’s curator of early modern manuscripts, points out that it even employs banners for dialogue, much like word balloons in modern comics.

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Sword & sorcery gets biblical in ‘Monomyth’

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The sword & sorcery subgenre, by its very definition, is rooted in fantastical worlds populated by sword-wielding heroes and supernatural events. It’s a setting writer Siike Donnelly and artist Eric Ninaltowski explore in their three-issue miniseries Monomyth, which draws inspiration from the Bible … known for its sword-wielding heroes and supernatural events.

Debuting July 30 from OSSM Comics, Monomyth takes the story of Adam and Eve, but arrives at a different result: In this series, Lucifer never fell from Heaven, and instead stopped Adam and Eve from eating from the Tree of Knowledge and being expelled from the Garden of Eden. In this story, it’s the archangel Michael who falls from Heaven, and here he’s assembled his own army to invade — and annihilate — Eden. The unlikely savior for the then-budding human race is the Lucifer and Enoch, known in the Bible as the son of Cain, who is, as Monomyth‘s creators call him, “rebellious, angry and a natural fighter.”

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‘Think Tank’ special to benefit Wounded Warrior Project

TTPTSD001_Proof_rev(1)-1Top Cow’s Think Tank special out next week is subtitled “Fun with PTSD,” and series co-creator Matt Hawkins makes it clear in the back matter of the issue that despite what that phrasing might suggest, he’s not making fun of post-traumatic stress disorder. After thoroughly researching the topic for the issue — which sees main character Dr. David Loren helping a SEAL team member with PTSD — he decided to donate 25 cents for each copy sold to the Wounded Warrior Project, a nonprofit dedicated to providing a variety of services to wounded military veterans — including victims of PTSD.

“With Think Tank I’ve done a lot of tongue-in-cheek stuff combined with serious subject matter and this was initially intended to be just another subject I wanted to tackle.” the writer and Top Cow president/COO told ROBOT 6. “Getting into it and seeing 250-pound buff military guys in tears is really hard to watch. The best explanation I can give is that people with PTSD feel kind of lost. They really don’t know what to do and are confused by their mind seemingly turning on them. For many, cognitive behavioral therapy and time will heal the scars on their souls but some will live out their days like that unless science can figure out a way to repair it. With the advances in brain research I think we’ll be making great strides in the very near future.”

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