Comic Strips Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

‘Mark Trail’ fans want more poacher-busting, less Rusty

mark trail

With its glacial pacing, signature earnestness and freakishly out-of-scale wildlife, Mark Trail is a fairly easy target for mockery, but the 68-year-old comic strip does have its fans.

Cartoonist James Allen, who worked as Jack Elrod’s assistant for nearly a decade, thought he had a pretty good idea of what those fans wanted: the occasional window into Mark’s family life (with a giant dog or goldfish, perhaps?). So after he taking over the daily strip in April, he set the khaki-clad adventurer on a course to spend a little time with long-neglected wife Cherry and son Rusty. Boy, was that so not what fans wanted.

After receiving several letters from “annoyed” readers, the Sun Journal of Lewiston, Maine, contacted Allen, who explained:

Continue Reading »

NYCC | IDW to collect ‘Amazing Spider-Man’ comic strips

asm-comic strip

Following news of an expanded partnership with Marvel for its Artist’s Edition line, IDW Publishing has announced it will release deluxe hardcover editions of the Amazing Spider-Man comic strip through its Library of American Comics imprint.

The strip debuted in January 1977 with a storyline by Stan Lee and John Romita Sr. that pitted wall-crawler against Doctor Doom, and it’s continued daily ever since. For much of its run, the comic has been produced by Larry Lieber, who was joined in more recent years by Paul Ryan, Alex Saviuk and Joe Sinnott.

Continue Reading »

Just how destructive were Calvin and Hobbes? (Answer: Very)

calvin-hobbes

When you curl up with a collection of Bill Watterson’s beloved comic strip, you likely give no thought to the actual costs of the path of destruction cut by Calvin and Hobbes during their nearly decade-long free-for-all. But a certain Matt J. Michel has.

The editor of Proceedings of the Natural Institute of Science (ahem, PNIS), “a part-serious, part-satirical journal publishing science-related articles,” Michel addressed the issue with all the seriousness — or at least part-seriousness — he could muster. Sitting down with the four-volume Complete Calvin and Hobbes, he scoured each of the 3,150 strips, attaching a price to each piece of damaged property explicitly depicted or attributed to the eternal 6-year-old.

Continue Reading »

Happy 64th birthday, ‘Peanuts’

peanuts2

Sixty-four years ago today, the beloved and influential Peanuts debuted in nine newspapers with a four-panel strip that set the tone for the future of “good ol’ Charlie Brown,” introduced through the words of Shermy, who admits his hatred for him.

Things didn’t get any better for the round-headed boy in the second installment, in which Patty (no, not Peppermint Patty) punches him in the eye. Snoopy doesn’t arrive until the third, but Schulz ensured the faithful companion wouldn’t make life much cheerier for Charlie Brown over the course of the 17,894 strips that followed.

Continue Reading »

Bill Watterson’s ‘Pearls’ strips to hit SDCC before they’re sold

watterson2-cropped

The three original comic strips from Bill Watterson’s surprise guest stint last month on Pearls Before Swine will be displayed this week at Comic-Con International before they’re sold at auction Aug. 8, with proceeds benefiting The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research.

The collaboration, which came at the suggestion of the Calvin and Hobbes creator, marked Watterson’s return to the comics page after a 19-year absence. Pastis teased readers that the week’s storyline would “contain a mind-blowing surprise,” but didn’t reveal what it was. Nevertheless, some fans quickly uncovered clues that some of the strips were ghost-drawn by Watterson.

Continue Reading »

IDW to release Wonder Woman comic strip collection in August

wonder-woman-cropped

The original Wonder Woman comic strip will be collected for the first time in August in IDW Publishing’s 196-page hardcover Wonder Woman: The Complete Newspaper Strip 1943-1944.

It’s part of the March 2013 partnership with DC Entertainment and the Library of American Comics that includes the Superman and Batman comic strip collections. Unlike the other two superheroes, who had lengthy tenures in newspapers (even if the Caped Crusader’s was broken up into three major runs), Wonder Woman’s was short-lived, lasting only from May 1, 1943 to Dec. 1, 1944.

Continue Reading »

Pastis confirms Watterson drew ‘Pearls Before Swine’ this week

pb140411

To answer a question that many people have been speculating on: Yes, Bill Watterson did contribute to Pearls Before Swine this week.

The creator of the comic strip, Stephan Pastis, confirmed on his blog what many people have been speculating — the Calvin & Hobbes creator did indeed return to the comic strip page and teamed with Pastis on three strips this week.

Comparing the experience to searching for Bigfoot, Pastis describes how the collaboration came about. It started with a comic strip tribute to Watterson (see above) and Washington Post cartoonist Nick Galifianakis, who worked with Watterson on The Art of Richard Thompson, giving Pastis Watterson’s email address. Pastis didn’t think he’d get a response.

Continue Reading »

Is Bill Watterson drawing this week’s ‘Pearls Before Swine’?

pearls2

On Monday, cartoonist Stephan Pastis kicked off a new Pearls Before Swine arc by teasing that this week’s strips “will contain a mind-blowing surprise.” That tantalizing tweet, coupled with artwork in a decidedly different style and a couple of potential dialogues, led some readers to speculate that parts of the storyline are drawn by none other than Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson.

At The Daily Cartoonist, Alan Gardner lays out some of the evidence, both for and against, and rounds up some of the Twitter chatter on the subject. He acknowledges, “I’m not fully convinced that it is Bill.”

Continue Reading »

Rees & Kupperman comic ‘too sensitive’ for New York Times?

see-something-cropped

“See Something, Say Something,” the biweekly comic by David Rees and Michael Kupperman, was missing Sunday from The New York Times’ Week in Review because, Kupperman says, editors deemed its subject matter “too sensitive.”

The strip, titled “Testosterone Entitlement Theatre Presents the Man Babies in ‘Hashtag Harassment,'” addresses specifically critics of the recent “#YesAllWomen” Twitter hashtag, and more broadly male entitlement.

Continue Reading »

Derf ends his comic strip ‘The City’ after 24 years

The final installment of "The City"

The final installment of “The City”

Derf Backderf, creator of the acclaimed memoir My Friend Dahmer, has ended his weekly comic strip The City after 24 years.

“I’m ending the strip so I can concentrate full-time on graphic novels,” he announced today on his blog. “It’s all good. I’m not slinking away from a failed endeavor as a washed-up has-been. I’m leaving it behind in a blaze of glory, as a newly minted, internationally-best-selling comix creator. The past couple years have been the best of my career. After 30 years of toil as a (at best) cult favorite to suddenly find success? I’m loving every fucking minute of it! I simply no longer have the time, nor, quite frankly, the desire, to devote to The City. Typically, it takes almost two full workdays to write and draw one strip. That’s time better devoted to other projects.”

Continue Reading »

World’s smallest comic is etched onto a human hair

smallest-comic

While minicomics are a fixture of conventions, and increasingly the Eisner Awards, it seems doubtful we’ll encounter microcomics in artists alley anytime soon. Still, cartoonist Claudia Puhlfürst‘s “Juana Knits the Planet” is leading the charge.

The 12-panel comic strip has been etched onto a single human hair using a focused ion beam, ” a very sharp and high-speed jet of matter is produced and directed towards the hair to etch it — similar to a fine laser beam.”

Continue Reading »

Jeffy gets existential in ‘Family Circus’/’True Detective’ mashup

flat-circus-new

For two months this winter many of us were swept up in HBO’s True Detective and the serpentine search by detectives Rust Cohle and Marty Hart not only for a serial killer but also for the meaning of life and the nature of good and evil. And while not everyone was satisfied with the ending, most of us remain enthralled with the writing of Nic Pizzolatto and the existential nihilism of Matthew McConaughey’s character.

And now we can experience both again, in a decidedly different form, with Time Is A Flat Circus, which combines dialogue from the crime drama with panels from the long-running comic The Family Circus. It’s as terrific as you imagine.

Continue Reading »

The webcomics documentary that’s actually about the funny pages

20140411-003704

The mission statement for Stripped!, a documentary by Dave Kellett (Sheldon) and Frederick Schroeder, is about forging a common history between webcomics and newspaper funnies. Not comic books, interestingly. I suppose that makes sense, as the most popular webcomics (xkcd, The Oatmeal and Penny Arcade) most closely resemble the four-panel forebears. It’s starting to become standard practice, by the way, to refer these sort of webcomics as “gag-a-day” or “short-form.”

Still, it’s a delight to explore this oft-neglected corner in the world of sequential art. The days of the celebrity cartoonists like Milton Caniff and Al Capp are long past, as depicted in archival footage where they were treated as major celebrities on early TV shows. However, the list of interviewees for Stripped! are still recognizable industry titans: Lynn Johnston. Jeff Smith. Greg Evans. Jim Davis. Mort Walker. Cathy Guisewite, who hilariously has the letters “AACK” hanging in her home. And one name that brings the directors to the point of fanboy glee, Bill Watterson … the first time he’s allowed his voice to be recorded. (Charles Schulz may no longer be with us, but his influential presence looms over the entire documentary.) It’s wonderful seeing the faces of the creators behind so many iconic characters. They gather here to reminisce, sharing crude doodles drawn as a child, their cherished influences, and the highs and lows of working under the syndicate system.

Continue Reading »

Washington Post pulls Sunday’s ‘Pearls Before Swine’

pearls-before-swine-cropped

Washington Post readers looking forward to a new installment of Stephan Pastis’ Pearls Before Swine in Sunday’s newspaper instead found a rerun after editors pulled the latest strip over objections to the use of the word “midget.”

In the strip, which did appear on the Post’s website, Goat and Rat are discussing how the acceptability of some terms changes over time, with “flight attendant” replacing “stewardess,” “housekeeper” succeeding “maid” and, yes, “little person” becoming preferable to “midget.” It’s a setup for the duo’s meeting with Willy the Word Decider, who’s tasked with determining which terms are acceptable.

Continue Reading »

Dick Tracy to set off in search of Little Orphan Annie

dick tracy-orphan annieAlthough few seemed to realize it, Little Orphan Annie has been missing for nearly four years, a victim of both declining readership and a murderous war criminal. But in June, the comics page’s greatest detective will set out in pursuit of the plucky young heroine.

In a curious crossover by the Dick Tracy team of Mike Curtis and Joe Staton, Oliver “Daddy” Warbucks will hire the detective to find Annie, who was last seen June 13, 2010 in Guatemala, the captive of the Butcher of the Balkans. While the fugitive criminal boasted that he has slaughtered “many,” he refused to kill Annie and instead pledged to take her with him on his travels.

Since then, a distraught Warbucks has searched the globe for his adopted daughter without success, leaving him with only one option — Dick Tracy.

“Joe and I have planned Annie’s rescue for some time,” Curtis said in a statement, “and we’ll deliver action-packed, over-the-top thrills and chills as the two features combine their casts for what we hope will be the most historic tale in comic strip history.”

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives