Creators Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Watch J.H. Williams’ art in motion in Blondie’s lyric video

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As we noted on Wednesday, multiple Eisner winner J.H. Williams III designed the packaging for Blondie’s upcoming album Ghosts of Download. But his art is also used in the new lyric video for the first single, “I Want to Drag You Around” (this week’s Record of the Week on BBC Radio 2).

Check out the video below. Ghosts of Download goes on sale May 13.

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‘Locke & Key’s’ Gabriel Rodriguez signs exclusive deal with IDW

SONY DSCGabriel Rodriguez, the Eisner-nominated artist of Locke & Key, has signed an exclusive contract with IDW Publishing, the company announced over the weekend at WonderCon Anaheim.

Since making his comics debut in 2003 with IDW’s CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, the artist has gone on to draw more than 2,000 pages and covers for the publisher on titles ranging from Angel to Land of the Dead to Clive Barker’s The Great and Secret Show. However, Rodriguez is best known for his lengthy collaboration with author Joe Hill on the bestselling horror series Locke & Key.

“I’m deeply honored to start this new journey with my long term friends and partners from IDW Publishing. I’m excited, thrilled and thankful,” he said in a statement. “This is not only a major step in my professional career over time, Ted Adams, Chris Ryall and everyone from the IDW team have become close friends of mine, making me feel part of a family. It’s both amazing and challenging to start this new stage in our creative collaborations, sharing a common vision: passion for art and comics, deep love for storytelling, high standards in personal and professional relationships. I hope to be able to give my very best in projects to come, and the few things we’ve already discussed hinted a path of amazing possibilities! It’s somehow overwhelming, it can’t get better than this.”

Rodriguez’s next IDW project is Little Nemo: Return to Slumberland, a collaboration with Eric Shanower announced last year at Comic-Con International. The eight-issue miniseries is scheduled to debut in August; an eight-page ashcan was distributed over the weekend at WonderCon.

Jim Zub explains why ‘Networking Is Not What You Think It Is’

Editor’s note: It’s with great pleasure that we present a guest post from Jim Zub, writer of Skullkickers, Samurai Jack, Red Sonja and Cub, Disney Kingdoms: Figment and many more. Jim regularly shares his insights and tips from his own experiences breaking into the comic industry over on his blog, and when he offered to let us post the latest one I jumped at the chance. This one, on networking, has good tips whether you’re looking to be a comic pro or just looking for a job in general.

Thanks to Jim for sharing; you can see the post on his blog right here.

*****

Jim Zubkavich

Jim Zub

by Jim Zub

“Networking” is one of those broad social terms that get tossed out in conversation, and everyone who’s been around a while nods their head knowingly when the word comes up, but it’s something I think is quite misunderstood by a lot of people trying to get their start in comics or any other creative business.

Networking is not entering a social setting, finding the most “powerful” person there and trying to dazzle them so you can become “friends”.

It’s not sending lists of questions to professionals so they can “help” you break in.

It’s not tagging people on Facebook so they see your artwork or writing.

It’s not about dominating a conversation or hogging the spotlight.

It’s not nepotism or elitism, contrary to what some may think.

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Osamu Tezuka exhibit added to Google Cultural Institute

Osamu Tezuka in 1959

Osamu Tezuka in 1959

The Google Cultural Institute has compiled images, videos and documents for an exhibit on Osamu Tezuka, marking the first time a manga artist has been featured in the digital historical archive.

Launched in 2011, the initiative is “an effort to make important cultural material available and accessible to everyone and to digitally preserve it to educate and inspire future generations.” With the participation of 40 institutions in 14 countries, the Google Cultural Institute offers free access to photographs, footage and documents from historical events and figures of the 20th century.

According to Asahi Shimbun, the Tezuka exhibit was added to the “Cultural Figures” section on Monday, the fiction birthday of Astro Boy. The collection consists of 172 images, video and text pieces from Tezuka Productions and the Osamu Tezuka Manga Museum.

“Tezuka repeatedly expressed his opposition to war and discrimination and emphasized the preciousness of life through his works,” said Yoshihiro Shimizu, chief of the copyright business division of Tokyo-based Tezuka Productions. “I am happy that information concerning Tezuka is spread around the globe (through the site) and his ideas are shared.”

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Stan Lee wishes Bob Kane were alive to see Marvel’s film success

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Separate from Bloomberg Businessweek‘s Marvel Studios cover story, Bloomberg Television chats with Stan Lee about the current popularity of superhero movies, concerns about “superhero fatigue,” and the differences between the box-office performances of the Marvel and DC Comics properties.

“I wish my friend Bob Kane were still with us — he’s the fellow who created Batman,” Lee says. “Bob always used to tease me about the fact that Batman was a big deal on television and in movies, and we at Marvel had done nothing. I wish he was here now so I could return that teasing. A character should be somebody that the reader, or viewer, really cares about, and maybe at Marvel we put a little more effort into refining the characteristics and the nature of our heroes, maybe a little more effort than they have on the other side of the aisle.”

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Tezuka’s daughter finds stash of her father’s erotic sketches

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When Osamu Tezuka passed away in February 1989 at age 60, he left behind countless fans, an influential body of work that includes Astro Boy, Black Jack and Buddha and, tantalizingly, a locked desk with a lost key.

Rocket News 24 reports that recently, some 25 years after the death of the “god of manga,” his daughter Rumiko to open the desk, where she discovered a half-eaten piece of chocolate, a handwritten essay about Akira creator Katsuhiro Otomo and a bag of sketches, including a stash of erotic drawings by Tezuka.

Note: I feel like I should place a warning in here, but I’m honestly at a loss as to whether these sketches aren’t safe for work. They’re not so much graphic as they are … odd?

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Cully Hamner spearheads campaign to help Joe Phillips

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Joe Phillips has been drawing comics for 25 years, telling stories of superheroes in the pages of Mister Miracle, Timber Wolf and Wonder Woman. Now he could use some heroes in his corner.

Last fall, complications from diabetes forced the artist to have his foot amputated. He’s received generous charitable assistance during that time from The Hero Initiative and IDW Publishing, for whom he recently drew Star Trek, but at the end of the day it’s not enough. But Phillips has incurred sizeable medical bills, and understandably has trouble getting up and about for work each day. So fellow artist Cully Hamner has stepped in to kickstart a $5,000 fundraising drive to pay for a prosthetic foot for Phillips.

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‘Akira’s’ Katsuhiro Otomo tackles Astro Boy for magazine

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Here’s a treat for fans of both Astro Boy and Katsuhiro Otomo: The creator of Akira drew Osamu Tezuka’s robot for the cover of the third volume of the industry magazine Anime Busience as only Otomo can.

Crunchyroll notes that Neon Genesis Evangelion character designer and manga author Yoshiyuki Sadamoto took on Akira for the cover of the magazine’s second volume (below), while Evangelion creator Hideaki Anno depicted Space Battleship Yamato for the first.

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Watch trailer for Bryan Talbot documentary ‘Graphic Novel Man’

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Digital Story Engine has released a trailer for its documentary The Graphic Novel Man: The Comics of Bryan Talbot, which, as the title suggests, chronicles the four-decade career of the creator of The Adventures of Luther Arkwright, The Tale of One Bad Rat, Alice in Sunderland and Grandville.

The trailer, which clocks in at more than three minutes, showcases plenty of shots of Talbot and his work, interspersed with excerpts from interviews with the likes of Neil Gaiman, David Lloyd, Warren Ellis, Pat Mills and Michael Moorcock about the artist and his impact.

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Bill Watterson talks readership, digital and more in new interview

calvin and hobbes

Bill Watterson has granted so few interviews in the 18 years since Calvin and Hobbes ended that when the rare one does surface, it certainly deserves attention. Such is the case with this new, if brief, Q&A released this morning by The Ohio State University’s Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum.

The chat centers on Exploring Calvin and Hobbes, an exhibit of original strips and specialty pieces opening Saturday, but broadens to include topics like Watterson’s process, the digital arena, and the decreasing likelihood another comic strip will resonate with so many people the way his did.

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‘Absolute Batman Incorporated’ to feature new Chris Burnham art

batman incorporated13Chris Burnham confirms he has redrawn the fill-in pages from the end of his run on Batman Incorporated for DC Comics’ upcoming Absolute edition of the Grant Morrison series.

“They’re all done, too!” he emphasized this morning on Twitter. “So I’m not redrawing them, I have redrawn them!”

Batman fan site Gotham Spoilers, which posed the question to Burnham, notes the fill-in art was “unfortunate, because this was one of those stories, that you really just couldn’t slap any artist on, as is the case with most Morrison penned stories.”

Burnham mentioned the undertaking in July, following the conclusion of Batman Incorporated, telling Batman-News, “I’m gonna redraw all of the fill-in pages for the last five issues! You know how the little fill-in pages kinda snuck in? So I’m pretty sure I”m gonna redraw those pages for the big deluxe hardcover.”

That deluxe hardcover, which clocks in at 608 pages, collects Batman Incorporated Vol. 1 #1-8, Batman Incorporated: Leviathan Strikes, Batman  Incorporated Vol. 2 #1-13 and Batman Incorporated Special #1. It arrives Dec. 2.

Watch that BBC documentary on Frank Quitely

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The BBC Four documentary about Frank Quitely we mentioned a couple of weeks ago has found its way online for viewing outside the United Kingdom.

The 30-minute episode aired as part of the channel’s What Do Artists Do All Day? series, which as the title suggests, centers on the working lives of artists. This installment follows the Glaswegian artist during a day of penciling Jupiter’s Legacy.

“If you’re a brain surgeon or a judge — a bad day at work is a big deal for someone,” Quitely says. “A bad day for me is when I rub out more marks than I leave on the page.”

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Lynn Johnston donates more material to Canadian archives

lynn johnston-archives canadaLibrary and Archives Canada has expanded its Lynn Johnston collection with the acquisition of new material, including more than 3,000 drawings, from the creator of For Better or For Worse.

“This is a remarkable addition to our holdings,” Hervé Déry, acting librarian and archivist of Canada, said in a statement. “Lynn Johnston’s work is significant to Canadians. We recognize ourselves in her characters’ reaction to everyday life.”

A native of Collingwood, Ontario, the cartoonist wrote and drew the comic strip about the Canadian family the Pattersons, which was syndicated from 1979 to 2008 in more than 2,000 newspapers worldwide. Returns continue to appear in almost as many newspapers. Johnston in 1985 was the first woman and the first Canadian to win the National Cartoonist Society’s Reuben Award; she was also nominated in 1993 for the Pulitzer Prize.

The new acquisition consists of 3,282 drawings, 296 watercolors, 3.5 meters (11.48 feet) worth of textual material, 244 photographs, 13 reproductions and eight object classified as “dolls and ephemera.” Those join 3,000 drawings and 5.5 meters of text already in the archive’s Johnston collection.

Based on Ottawa, Library and Archives Canada is a federal institution tasked with acquiring and preserving the country’s documentary heritage.

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Whilce Portacio launches talent search for new Manila studio

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Artist and Image Comics co-founder Whilce Portacio is returning to his roots with the launch of a comics studio in his native Philippines.

Portacio, who turns 50 this year, announced on his Facebook fan page that he’s conducting a talent search for artists to work alongside him in a “new kind of art studio” in Manila. The veteran artist, who’s worked in comics since 1984, is offering salaried positions for pencilers, inkers and colorists.

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Find out what Frank Quitely does all day in BBC documentary

frank quitely

Scottish fans on Tuesday will be able to tune in for a 30-minute documentary on Frank Quitely airing as part of BBC Four’s series What Do Artists Do All Day?

For the acclaimed Glaswegian artist, the answer is “Draw Jupiter’s Legacy,” his Image Comics collaboration with Mark Millar. The episode follows Quitely over the course of the day, until “he eventually calls it a night at 04.30am, sleeping in his studio, as he does regularly.”

Full details are available on the BBC Four website, along with a clip, which apparently won’t play in the United States.

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