Digital Comics Archives - Page 2 of 11 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

BOOM! Bundle offers ‘Lumberjanes,’ ‘The Woods’ and more

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BOOM! Studios has added its name to the list of publishers embracing Humble Bundle with a promotion that allows readers to name their own price for digital editions of comics ranging from RoboCop to Lumberjanes to Mouse Guard.

By now you likely know how Humble Bundle operates, with customers getting DRM-free downloads for as little as a penny, with a portion of the proceeds going to a charity (in this case, the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund).

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Top Cow offering ‘Genius’ ‘zero issue’ for free on comiXology

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With Genius #1, by Marc Bernardin, Adam Freeman and Afua Richardson, going on sale Wednesday, Top Cow Productions is offering the “zero issue” — the 2008 Pilot Season one-shot — for free on comiXology.

Arriving weekly throughout August, the five-issue miniseries follows teenager Destiny Ajaye, the greatest military mind of her generation, who unites the gangs of South Central Los Angeles and secedes three square blocks of her neighborhood from the United States. Continue Reading »

Skybound’s ‘The Walking Dead’ Bundle is in final hours

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The clock is ticking down at Humble Bundle on Skybound’s The Walking Dead Bundle, which allows customers to name their own price for DRM-free digital editions of the first volumes of Ghosted, Invincible, Witch Doctor and, of course, The Walking Dead.

The deal doesn’t stop there, however: Those who pay more than the average amount offered ($11.59) can unlock the second and third volumes of The Walking Dead, the first volumes of Thief of Thieves, Manifest Destiny and Clone, the first and second volumes of Super Dinosaur, and the second volume of Invincible. Fifteen dollars will also open the fourth and fifth volumes of The Walking Dead.

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SDCC | Top Shelf returns with its ‘biggest digital sale ever’

top shelfTop Shelf Productions is again celebrating Comic-Con International with a “Cyber-Con Sale,” offering deep discounts on 150 digital titles, including March Book One, Monster on the Hill, God is Disappointed in You, American Elf and From Hell.

The publisher’s “biggest digital sale ever” also includes Eddie Campbell’s Bacchus, available now for the first time in digital form. (All of the Top Shelf titles are DRM-free, too, and downloadable in PDF, CBZ or ePub formats.)

But for the Top Shelf aficionado, there’s this: comiXology’s Top Shelf Treasury, featuring 172 titles — every comic and graphic novel the publisher offers on the digital platform, more than 25,000 pages in all — for $149.99. As Chris Ross, Top Shelf’s director of digital publishing, said today during the company’s Comic-Con International panel, that collection would give readers “a bachelor’s degree in independent comics.”

ComiXology is also holding a sale on other, less massive Top Shelf bundles: Double Barrel, American Elf, Lost Girls and Motorcycle Samurai.

The “Cyber-Con Sale” ends when Comic-Con does — Sunday. So you’ll have to act fast.

SDCC | DC and Image hold hefty digital sales

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Like comiXology and Marvel Unlimited, DC Entertainment and Image Comics are celebrating Comic-Con International with sales on select digital titles.

Through Tuesday, DC is marking the 75th anniversary of the Dark Knight by offering digital downloads of a whopping 750 Batman comics for 99 cents each. These aren’t typical dollar-bin titles, however; they include The Dark Knight Returns, The Long Halloween, No Man’s Land, Year One, Hush, The Court of the Owls and All Star Batman & Robbin the Boy Wonder. If you’re wanting to go way back, there are comics dating back to 1938, with Batman’s debut in Detective Comics #27.

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SDCC | Marvel offers another 99-cent Marvel Unlimited deal

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If you’ve wanted to explore Marvel’s massive digital archive, now’s your chance: For the next week, in celebration of Comic-Con International, 99 cents will get you a month-long subscription to Marvel Unlimited and its online collection of more than 15,000 classic and newer comics, dating from the Golden Age to about six months ago.

The publisher offered a similar deal in March for South by Southwest; a monthly membership normally costs $9.99, while a basic annual subscription is $69.

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SDCC | Where to find digital comics and webcomics

comic-con-fridayI’ve never been to a comics convention, but I can imagine it can be overwhelming — Comic-Con International especially, with its enormous exhibition hall, packed programming schedule and multiple venues. There’s a webcomics presence, but it remains something of a niche. A quick scan of events, for example, turns up more presentations on how to become big on deviantART than anything directly connected with webcomics.

There’s a powerfully strong digital comics representation, however. Perhaps this indicates a swing from the independent, comic strip-influenced world of webcomics to the formalized, floppy-inspired format of digital. Shoot, Publishers Weekly even arranged a panel to discuss that very thing on Friday morning with “Behind the Digital Line.” Mark Waid has an entire panel devoted to pitching ideas to Thrillbent. Monkeybrain Comics will have a roundtable about the benefits of publishing digitally. And on Sunday, “Digital Comics: Going Beyond the Page” will feature a discussion with a panel that includes Waid (Thrillbent) and Ron Perraza (formerly of comiXology and DC’s digital division).

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ComiXology offers 100 comiXology Submit books for $10

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ComiXology is celebrating its fifth anniversary with a deal that’s pretty difficult to pass up: a bundle of 100 titles from comiXology Submit, its self-publishing platform for independent creators, for just $10.

That’s 10 cents each for comics like Wolves by Becky Cloonan, Aw Yeah Comics! #1 by Art Baltazar, Franco and others, nemu*nemu: Out of This World by Audra Ann S. Furuichi, Feather #1 by Steve Uy, and The Pride #1 by Joe Glass, Marc Ellerby, Joshua Faith and Gavin Mitchell. Plus, y’know, 95 others.

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‘High Crimes': mountain of madness

High_Crimes_04-1One upon a time, an entire subcontinent crashed into the largest continent. Tectonic plates collided, sending rocks jutting toward the heavens. Jagged peaks formed formed the Himalayas, and looming higher than any other was Everest. Sir Edmund Hilary famously journeyed to the top of the world, a feat that inspired generations of explorers to believe that no place on Earth is unconquerable. But they’re not always right, for on its icy, windswept cliffs, many an intrepid soul has succumbed to its perils. Everest is a mountain of madness. It’s a mountain … of death.

Christopher Sebela and Ibrahim Moustafa’s Eisner-nominated comic High Crimes (Monkeybrain) follows the thrilling, high-stakes adventure of a lost soul named Suzanne “Zan” Jansen. She was an avid snowboarder until her Olympic dreams were cruelly crushed by an injury. Haunted by failure, her days are spent in an unbreakable cycle of drinking and self-loathing. She ends up involved in a sordid occupation: finding the missing bodies of those who disappeared on climbing expeditions. The dirty work is done by her grizzled, older business partner Haskell, who chops a hand off the dead, then returns to base to have it stored in his freezer. The fingerprints are traced by a corrupt police officer, and the identity lets them know which families to bribe.

One day, Haskell is dealt a bad hand. Literally. It belongs to a decades-old corpse who used to be Sebastian Mars. He’s not just a climber; he’s a person of interest. Inside the severed hand, Zan discovers a capsule containing a rolled-up microfiche of secrets. It turns out that it’s something like the Maltese Falcon: the stuff that dreams are made of, and a thing of extreme value to the wrong kinds of people.

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‘Bandette': the merry thief for France

21225This year, The Oatmeal dominates the Eisner Best Digital comic category as “the one that most people have heard of.” That’s pretty much in direct contrast to last year, which was populated by five relatively obscure titles. It’s a testament, I think, to the far-reaching diversity of webcomics, where few ever become pop culture superstars but many have devoted fanbase. You had indie-style comics like Ant Comic and It Will All Hurt, the haunting short story Our Bloodstained Roof and the classic Thimble Theater-inspired art of Oyster War.

The eventual winner, though, was the one that most closely resembled a traditional comic. Paul Tobin and Colleen Coover’s Bandette (Monkeybrain Comics) was the first Eisner winner that had to be downloaded from comiXology — a true “digital comic” as opposed to a “webcomic.” I imagine that the familiar panel layout was the one least likely to send traditionalists into paroxysms. Heck, the tone of the story itself feels very much like a throwback to both Silver Age comic stories and European all-ages fare like The Adventures of Tintin. But so what? It’s old school, and in a way that made it refreshingly novel.

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Neil Googe developing ‘Welcome to the Hood’ comic, game

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Neil Googe has made a career drawing the works of others — from recent fill-in issues on DC Comics’ The Flash and the impressive graphic novel Word of Warcraft: Dark Riders to Wildstorm’s Mr. Majestic and Welcome to Tranquility. But now the Bangkok-based British cartoonist is returning to the world of creator-owned, but not just in comics. For the past few months, he’s been writing on his website about a new transmedia project titled Welcome to the Hood.

Mixing ’90s-era gangster rap with a love for apocalyptic scenarios, Cthulhu and world-building, Googe is looking to create a story and a universe to rival those he’s worked in for the past 15-plus years.

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‘Moose Kid Comics’ anthology makes its free digital debut

moose kid comicsIt’s shaping up to be a red-letter day for fans of free quality comics: As if that digital edition of Warren Ellis and Jason Howard’s Trees #1 weren’t proof enough, this morning also saw the debut of Moose Kid Comics, an impressive children’s anthology featuring the work of more than 40 creators.

Created and edited by Jamie Smart, the 36-page digital comic boasts such talents as Roger Langridge, Tom Plant, Neill Cameron and Abby Ryder, Mark Stafford, Aaron Alexovich, Sarah McIntyre, James Downing, and Samantha Davies. And did we mention the “Young Tank Girl” strip by Alan Martin and Warwick Johnson-Cadwell?

“Here in the U.K, mainstream children’s comics have been dying out, especially ones featuring original content,” reads the comic’s mission statement. “The Phoenix and The Beano are the only commercially available weekly titles still producing entirely original characters, but they are competing against big-name licensed titles based on TV shows or merchandising. We want to help change things. We want to be creating the next generation of loveable characters for the world to embrace, all created by artists who retain their copyrights and put all their heart into their creations. We want to remind both children and adults alike how fantastical and imaginative comics can be, and to help bring children’s comics back into the public consciousness.”

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Read Warren Ellis and Jason Howard’s ‘Trees’ #1 for free

trees1Ahead of the release of Trees #2, by Warren Ellis and Jason Howard, Image Comics is offering the digital edition of the first issue for free across all platforms through Tuesday.

“It’s not every day that a writer as important and influential as Warren Ellis launches a major new series, so making sure Trees reaches as many readers as possible is an ongoing priority for us here at Image,” Publisher Eric Stephenson said in a statement.

Debuting May 28, the sci-fi miniseries is set a decade after enormous, sentient tree-like creatures arrived on Earth, putting down roots and standing silent vigil, without even acknowledging the planet’s inhabitants.

“When we were developing the idea Warren asked me what kind of things I wanted to draw,” Howard, who previously collaborated with Ellis on Scatterlands, told Comic Book Resources. “I sent him a folder of a bunch of images that inspired me. From there he sent me the basic idea of, what if aliens landed and didn’t seem to do anything? What happens to society when these alien structures land but nothing comes out and after a while they become normal and they just stand there, like trees? I thought that sounded fascinating and could immediately visualize situations and story potential. I excitedly told him I loved it and we were off.”

Trees #1 is available for free through Tuesday on ImageComics.com and the Image Comics iOS app, and across comiXology‘s platforms. Trees #2 arrives June 25.

Thrillbent offers first chapter of ‘Empire’ Volume 2 for free

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Coinciding with the release today of the second chapter of Mark Waid and Barry Kitson’s Empire Volume 2, Thrillbent is making the first chapter available for free.

Originally published in 2000 through Image Comics, and later with DC Comics, Empire is set in a world a where the evil armored despot Golgoth has won, defeating all of its heroes. Volume 2, which launched May 28 after a 10-year hiatus, continues the saga of Golgoth, whose grip on Earth is as strong as ever.

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A creator’s eye view of Graphicly

Graphicly

Graphicly

The announcement late last month that digital distributor Graphicly would close and its key employees join self-publishing platform Blurb was met immediately by questions, many of which centered on whether the company’s clients will be paid what they’re owed.

Originally envisioned as “iTunes for comics,” Boulder, Colorado-based Graphicly was soon overshadowed by competitor comiXology, and in 2012 shuttered its comics app to focus instead on providing visually based books and comics to eBook platforms. In its most recent incarnation, Graphicly was a digital conversion and distribution service: For a fee of $150, the company would convert a comic to ePub and other formats and distribute it to digital platforms such as Amazon’s Kindle, Barnes & Noble’s Nook and Apple’s iBooks. Graphicly would then act as middleman, collecting money from sales on those platforms and passing it along to the creators. Unlike other digital comics distributors, Graphicly didn’t take a cut of sales on eBook platforms, just the upfront fee.

Since Graphicly announced its closing on May 27, a number of creators have asserted publicly that the company wasn’t tracking sales correctly and hasn’t paid them what they’re owed from sales. Bleeding Cool spoke to Dave Dellecese and representatives of Th3rd World Studios, as well as a former Graphicly employee. At The Beat, Marc Ellerby and Mike Garley told similar stories, and Eric Grissom and Dara Naraghi added their names in the comments. Ellerby tweeted:

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