Events Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

‘Attack on Titan’ Real Escape Game stomps into U.S. cities

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The “Attack on Titan x Real Escape Game” is crashing into the United States.

Kodansha and SCRAP Entertainment have announced dates in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York City for “Escape From the Walled City,” an immersive, interactive game inspired by Hajime Isayama’s hit manga and anime.

Debuting in 2009, Attack on Titan is a post-apocalyptic fantasy set in a world where remorseless, flesh-eating giants have all but wiped out humanity, whose remnants are forced to live within a country surrounded by three enormous walls.

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Amanda Conner designs Free Comic Book Day T-shirt

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Diamond Comic Distributors has unveiled the Free Comic Book Day 2015 commemorative T-shirt designed by Amanda Conner and colored by Paul Mounts.

The tee, which will be available in adult and youth sizes from the January issue of Previews, depicts images of a variety of young readers — one of them otherworldly — enjoying comic books, set against a FCBD logo.

“I remembered what many of us comic book readers actually are …  frustrated superheroes,” Conner said in a statement. “I thought about making a piece of art that would resemble a superhero insignia. Hopefully when you see it from a distance, that’s what it looks like.”

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Free Comic Book Day 2015 confirmed for May 2

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Diamond Comic Distributors has officially announced the date for Free Comic Book Day: May 2, 2015, the event’s traditional spot on the first Saturday in May, which coincides with the opening weekend of Marvel Studios’ Avengers: Age of Ultron.

Last year’s Free Comic Book Day saw a record-breaking turnout, with a reported 4.7 million comic books handed out to more than 1 million customers who showed up at the 2,100 participating locations across North America and around the globe. Diamond anticipates that next year’s celebration — the 14th — will be even bigger.

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TCAF launches pop-up shop with Chip Zdarsky signing

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The Toronto Comic Arts Festival is opening a boutique store at the Toronto Reference Library, site of the annual event.

The TCAF Pop-Up Shop will kick off Wednesday at 6 p.m. with a book launch for the comedy sex guide Just the Tips, featuring co-author Chip Zdarsky (who wrote the book with Sex Criminals collaborator Matt Fraction). The store will begin regular business hours Thursday at 9 a.m.

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Jeff Smith, Tom Spurgeon team for Cartoon Crossroads Columbus

cxc logoBone cartoonist Jeff Smith and comics journalist Tom Spurgeon are the driving force behind Cartoon Crossroads Columbus, an annual four-day comics festival set to debut in fall 2016 in Columbus, Ohio.

That will be preceded next year by a two-day CXC Launch Event held Oct. 2, 2015, at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum and Oct. 3 at the Columbus Cultural Arts Center (the second day is characterized as a comics expo with up to 35 exhibitors).

Smith, who lives in Columbus, will serve as the festival’s president and artistic director. Spurgeon, editor of The Comics Reporter, will be festival director; he plans to relocate to Columbus early next year.

“We’re extremely excited to try and bring a first-class comics festival to Columbus, Ohio,” Smith said in a statement. “I’ve attended and enjoyed so many great shows over the years, and hope that CXC can take its place alongside them.”

Smith and Spurgeon are joined on the CXC executive committee by Lucy Caswell, founder of the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum, and Vijaya Iyer, president and co-publisher of Cartoon Books. More details are promised in early 2015.

This weekend, it’s the Locust Moon Comics Festival

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If you’re a comics fan who happens to be in the Philadelphia area on Saturday, you’ll not want to miss the third annual Locust Moon Comics Festival.

Held from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the The Rotunda in West Philadelphia (4014 Walnut St.), the event features an impressive guest list that includes Bill Sienkiewicz, Paul Pope, Denis Kitchen, J.G. Jones, Farel Dalrymple, Dave Bullock, Box Brown, Nathan Fox, Dean Haspiel, Rebecca Mock, Dave Bullock, Tom Scioli, José Villarrubia, Benjamin Marra and Ronald Wimberly.

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Halloween ComicFest to haunt comic shops this weekend

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On Saturday, comic shops across North America and around the world will celebrate Halloween ComicFest, which has taken on the dimensions of a second Free Comic Book Day. This is a relatively new event — the first was held in 2012 — but according to the HCF website, more than 1,400 stores participated last year, attracting 100,000 customers. The event is run by a group of retailers, publishers and suppliers, with Diamond Comic Distributors handling publicity and a lot of the logistics.

This year’s comics lindup includes 12 full-size comics and seven minicomics, although all retailers may not offer all titles. It looks like most of the comics are repackaged first issues of series that have been around for a little while, like Afterlife With Archie, Rachel Rising and Scooby-Doo Team-Up — all fitting choices for Halloween reading. Zenoscope offers a reprint of its first Halloween Special, and Avatar Press has the first issue of Max Brooks’ Extinction Parade.

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Saturday is 24-Hour Comics Day

24HCD12_300x250_color_11Saturday is 24-Hour Comics Day, when creators are invited to create a comic from start to finish in 24 hours of continuous work. Scott McCloud came up with the original set of rules:

THE DARE: To create a complete 24 page comic book in 24 continuous hours.

That means everything: Story, finished art, lettering, color (if applicable), paste-up, everything. Once pen hits paper, the clock starts ticking. 24 hours later, the pen lifts off the paper, never to descend again. Even proofreading has to occur in the 24 hour period. (Computer-generated comics are fine of course, same principles apply).

No sketches, designs, plot summaries or any other kind of direct preparation can precede the 24 hour period. Indirect preparation such as assembling tools, reference materials, food, music etc. is fine.

The 24 hours are continuous. You can take a nap, but the clock keeps ticking. If you get to 24 hours and you’re not done, either end it there (“the Gaiman Variation”) or keep going until you’re done (“the Eastman Variation”). I consider both of these “Noble Failure” Variants and true 24 hour comics in spirit; but you must sincerely intend to do the 24 pages in 24 hours at the outset.

It was Nat Gertler who turned the dare into an event: As he told ROBOT 6’s Tim O’Shea earlier this year, on the 10th anniversary, it started as a way to drum up publicity for an anthology of 24-hour comics he was publishing, and it snowballed from there. Now it is organized by the retailer group ComicsPRO, and participants are invited to send their 24-hour comics to the the national 24-Hour Comics Day archive at the Billy Ireland Cartoon Library and Museum at Ohio State University.

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Happy National Comic Book Day, everybody!

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Because readers have undoubtedly been counting down the days on their calendars, it’s probably unnecessary to say what today is — but we’ll do so anyway: It’s Sept. 25, National Comic Book Day!

No, not Free Comic Book Day; that’s in May. National Comic Book Day, the unofficial holiday whose origins are as mysterious as its observers are scarce. As we noted last year, no one takes credit for its founding — heck, no one seems to know when it began — it receives little to no industry support, and there are no traditions tied to it (however, you can always try asking your local retailer for a free comic).

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Popeye art show celebrates 85 years of the Sailor Man

By Francesco Francavilla

By Francesco Francavilla

Although there have been plenty of events — with still more to come — in celebration of Batman’s 75th anniversary, Popeye’s 85-year milestone has gone largely unnoticed. However, King Features Syndicate and Los Angeles’s Hero Complex Gallery are about to remedy that.

The official “Popeye: A Tribute Art Show” premieres Friday, with more than 100 artists from around the world paying homage to the spinach-eating sailor introduced in 1929 in E.C. Segar’s Thimble Theatre comic strip.

Curated by by the illustrator Chogrin, the show features works by such artists as Francesco Francavilla, Brent Engstrom, Miranda Dressler, Scott Balmer, Alina Chau and Shawn Dickinson. Of course, they’re just for starters. You can see some of the pieces below, and more on the art show’s blog and Facebook page.

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New York brewery to debut exclusive King Kirby Ale at fundraiser

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To help celebrate what would’ve been Jack Kirby’s 98th birthday, Shmaltz Brewery in Clifton Park, New York, will debut a limited-edition King Kirby Ale as part of an Aug. 28 fundraiser to benefit The Hero Initiative. A limited number of cases will be available for purchase at the event.

Approached by local artists about holding an event, the brewery went a step further and created the exclusive ale (available as both pale and dark), which features a label designed by Paul Harding. “I tried to capture Kirby from an angle that few have seen before,” the Clifton Park artist said in a statement, “in a way that people can actually look up to him and get a sense of his artistic power.”

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Future of ZombieWalk uncertain after Comic-Con accident

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Courtesy of ZombieWalk: San Diego

The future of SDCC ZombieWalk: San Diego, held annually during Comic-Con International, is uncertain after a car drove into a crowd of participants and spectators Saturday, injuring three. A scheduled Oct. 26 event has been called off.

“Yes, the October walk is canceled,” organizers posted on their Facebook page. “We are evaluating continuing at all, at this point.”

Accounts of Saturday’s incident vary, but the San Diego Police Department says Honda Accord driven by a deaf man was stopped at Second and Island avenues at 5:30 p.m. as the procession of hundreds of participants in zombie makeup lumbered by. After waiting several minutes, the 48-year-old driver started rolling slowly into the crowd because his children, who are also deaf, were frightened. According to police, several people the surrounded the car and began hitting it, shattering the windshield. That’s when the father reportedly drove forward again, striking the 64-year-old woman. The crowd chased after the car as the family drove toward a police officer.

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Hutchinson, Kansas, proclaims itself Smallville for two days

welcome to smallvilleHutchinson, Kansas, will be proclaimed “Smallville — The Home of Clark Kent” Friday and Saturday in celebration of the inaugural Smallville Festival and Smallville ComicCon.

You may recall that in 2012, three Hutchinson residents launched a campaign to rename the city after Superman’s hometown, saying the two share many traits. Plus, the move would likely provide an economic boost to the area. Although the city council didn’t approve a permanent change, last year it did declare June 21 “Smallville Day,” for which The Hutchinson News temporarily became The Daily Planet.

This year, plans are bigger, with the Smallville Festival kicking off Thursday with downtown events that include a car show, Superman-themed photo booth and a screening of Man of Steel, followed on Friday with such activities as a picnic in the park and a benefit concert. And then Saturday sees the first Smallville ComicCon, with guests that include Smallville veterans Alaina Huffman and Phil Morris.

“What I want this festival to represent is the smallest things mean the most,” Christopher Wietrick, who spearheaded the initial Smallville campaign, tells The Hutchinson News. “I want it to serve as a reminder that something little can make a difference. The festival is about giving back and celebrating our heroes.”

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What’s hot for summer and fall: Comics and graphic novels at BEA

Mel Caylo and the Lumberjanes at the BOOM! Studios booth

Mel Caylo and the Lumberjanes at the BOOM! Studios booth

Book Expo America is the annual trade show where publishers promote their upcoming books to retailers and librarians. BEA is all about books, but comics and graphic novels are a growing presence. Diamond had a dedicated area, as it has in previous years, several comics publishers had their own booths, and several of the big publishers featured graphic novels alongside their other titles, most notably Hachette, which gave quite a bit of space to Yen Press.

I spent Friday at the show looking at which books the publishers were drawing the most attention to. Here’s a very subjective account of what I saw.

Kid stuff! Children’s and YA graphic novels have been hot for a couple of years, and the news that Raina Telgemeier’s Sisters is getting a 200,000 copy initial print run got a lot of buzz. Of course, the BEA crowd has been on board with her work for a while, and they lined up in droves for her book signing. The same was true of Jeff Kinney, who was signing copies of The Wimpy Kid School Planner at the Abrams booth; the crowd just kept on coming. And the staff at the BOOM! Studios table were hustling as attendees grabbed copies of their Adventure Time and Bravest Warrior collections as well as their third original Peanuts graphic novel, Peanuts: The Beagle Has Landed, which takes Snoopy to the moon.

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British Library debuts trailer for ‘Comics Unmasked’

Comics scholar Paul Gravett, reimagined

Comics scholar Paul Gravett, reimagined

The British Library has debuted a trailer — a “Curators’ Introduction” — to promote “Comics Unmasked: Art and Anarchy in the U.K.,” the largest comics exhibition to date in the United Kingdom.

Opening Friday to the public, “Comics Unmasked” spans the history of British comic books, from the 19th century to the present, exploring how they’ve addressed such subjects as violence, sexuality and drugs while breaking boundaries. The exhibition kicks off with a screening of the documentary Graphic Novel Man: The Comics of Bryan Talbot, followed by a conversation with Bryan Talbot, Mary Talbot and Kate Charlesworth.

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