Graphic Novels Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

I.N.J. Culbard to adapt ‘The King in Yellow’ for SelfMadeHero

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Celeste cartoonist I.N.J. Culbard is adapting The King in Yellow, the 1895 short-story collection by Robert W. Chambers that received renewed attention this year because of the HBO crime drama True Detective.

Culbard revealed the cover for the 144-page graphic novel, set to be released in May by U.K. publisher SelfMadeHero.

Chambers’ collection of 10 supernatural tales takes its title from a fictional forbidden play mentioned in four stories that drives anyone who reads it to despair or madness. H.P. Lovecraft was influenced by The King in Yellow, and borrowed some of its elements for his own work.

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Metabaron to return in new saga from Humanoids

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The Metabaron, the ultimate warrior introduced in 1981 by Alexandro Jodorowsky and Mœbius, will return in June 2016 in a new series from Humanoids.

Based on a story by Jodorowsky and written by Jerry Frissen, the four-volume series will explore the mystery of what happened to the last of the Metabarons. A new 108-page book, or cycle, will released every eight months, each drawn by a different artist: The first will be illustrated by rising star Valentin Sécher (Khaal: Chronicles of a Galactic Emperor), and the second by Niko Henrichon (Noah, The Pride of Baghdad).

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Corto Maltese sets sail with new story by ‘Blacksad’ writer

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Corto Maltese is one of the most prized series and characters in European comics, and now he’s coming back.

The comic’s longtime publisher Casterman has announced the October 2015 release of the first new Corto Maltese story in 25 years. As creator Hugo Platt passed away in 1995, Blacksad writer Juan Diaz Canales will be joined by artist Ruben Pellejero for the new story. There’s no word word whether this will be serialized or published as a standalone book, but Casterman promises it will be released simultaneously in Europe in French, Spanish, Italian and Dutch. What about English-speaking audiences? Well, that’s another story.

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‘Die Hard’ meets Disneyland in ‘Ricky Rouse Has a Gun’

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What if terrorists took over a theme park, and the only onwho could save you was one of the park’s costumed mascots? That’s the story of the recently released graphic novel Ricky Rouse Has a Gun by writer/director Jörg Tittel and artist John Aggs. Using thinly veiled versions of Disney’s mascot and a host of other media properties to to populate their theme park, Tittel and Aggs aren’t only making an action story, they’re critiquing corporate consumerism.

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‘Persepolis’ survives Illinois school challenge

free-persepolis-1-300x288The Ball-Chatham School Board in Chatham, Illinois, voted unanimously this week to keep Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis on a reading list for seniors at Glenwood High School.

Mike Housewirth, the father of a student, had asked that the graphic novel be removed from the list, questioning the teacher’s judgment in assigning a book about Muslims on Sept. 11. He also objected to the book’s depictions of torture (particularly one in which a guard urinates on a prisoner) and dismembered bodies.

“If my son had drawn a picture like that at school, he would have been expelled,” Housewirth said, adding that while he felt his son was mature enough to read the book, the overall tone was “appalling.”

“Reading controversial material does not hurt students or corrupt them,” countered Glenwood High School Principal Jim Lee. Students don’t simply read a book and accept it at face value, he added; they use it as a springboard for discussion and reach their own conclusions.

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‘The Middleman’ cast reunites for graphic novel script read

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Following through on one of the promises of Javier Grillo-Marxuach’s successful Indiegogo campaign to fund a new Middleman graphic novel, the cast of the short-lived television adaptation reunited for a table read of The Pan-Universal Parental Reconciliation, which was of course captured on video.

“Why is this man smiling?” Grillo-Marxauch writes beneath a photo of himself at the reunion. “Might be that I am in the middle of one of the happiest moments in my middle-history!”

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Tempers flare at school board meeting in fight about ‘Persepolis’

persepolisA school board meeting in Murphy, Oregon, turned heated Tuesday when a board member went head to head with parents about Marjane Satrapi’s graphic memoir Persepolis.

According to the Medford Mail Tribune, the parents object to the availability of the graphic novel in the Three Rivers School District’s high school libraries. Some contend teenagers shouldn’t have access to the book without parental approval.

Depicting Satrapi’s experience as a child and young adult in Iran during the Islamic revolution, Persepolis has received almost universal acclaim. The 2007 animated adaptation directed by Satrapi and Vincent Paronnaud was nominated for an Academy Award. The graphic novel was at the center of a controversy in March 2013, when Chicago Public Schools ordered its removal, sparking protests from parents, teachers and student. That order was quickly rescinded, but CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett asked that Persepolis no longer be taught to seventh-graders, as it may not be appropriate for that age group.

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Jewish activists threaten boycott of London stores selling ‘Hipster Hitler’

hipster hitlerA group of Jewish activists is threatening to boycott and protest outside stores in the London borough of Camden that sell Hipster Hitler, a collection of the webcomic that satirizes hipster culture and the Third Reich.

If that doesn’t work, the Hampstead & Highgate Express reports, members of London Stands With Israel plan to buy and shred all copies of the comic, which some say is “sick” and “anti-Semitic.” They’re specifically targeting Mega City Comics, a Jewish-owned store in Camden Town.

Created in 2010 by James Carr and Archana Kumar, the webcomic stars an Adolf Hitler who wears trendy glasses, skinny jeans, thrift-store sweaters and shirts bearing slogans like “Eastside Westside Genocide,” “I (Heart) Juice” and “Death Camp For Cutie.”  It also features characters like Broseph Stalin, a sendup of the Soviet leader. Hipster Hitler quickly drew attention on Reddit, inspiring an Internet meme, T-shirts and homemade Halloween costumes.

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First Second reveals ‘Secret Coders’ from Yang and Holmes

secret codersFirst Second Books has announced Secret Coders, a graphic novel by Eisner winner and National Book Award finalist Gene Luen Yang and Bravest Warriors cartoonist Mike Holmes. The publisher indicated on Twitter that it’s the first book in a series.

Aimed at middle-schoolers, Secret Coders centers on Hopper and Eni, who discover their rather mundane prep school was built atop another mysterious institution, one dedicated dedicated to secret and wonderful knowledge — computer code.

“There’s something magic about coding, especially old-school coding,” Yang, who for the past 17 years has taught computer programming to high-school students, tells Wired. “When you type these words into this machine, something kind of magic, something kind of crazy happens.”

His hope is for readers to learn code alongside Hopper and Eni. “There’s a pure, visceral sense of joy [in coding] that I want to communicate with my students and my readers,” Yang says. “When I learned how to code in fifth grade there was something very empowering about it. What I tell my students is that deep down inside of every coder is this desire for control. You get to tell this really powerful machine what to do.”

First Second, which published Yang’s American Born Chinese, The Eternal Smile, Level Up, Boxers and Saints and The Shadow Hero, will release Secret Coders on Sept. 28.

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Comic Bento: It’s like Loot Crate, but with graphic novels

comic bentoI somehow managed to miss the launch of Comic Bento, a monthly graphic-novel subscription service in the tradition of Loot Crate.

A project of Blind Ferret, Comic Bento picks up where Pullist left off: Each month, a themed selection of graphic novels, from publishers ranging from DC Comics and Marvel to Oni Press and Image Comics, is boxed up (with some other goodies) and shipped to subscribers. For August, the theme is science fiction.

According to the website, it amounts to more than $50 worth of graphic novels for a price as low as $17.95 a month, plus shipping. Of course, the cost depends on which subscription plan you choose. One month is $20 (plus $5 shipping within the United States); a three-month plan works out to $18.34 a month, and so on.

A perusal of Comic Bento’s FAQ also turns up an interesting tidbit: For (truthful) subscribers under the age of 13 will receive boxes of family-friendly comics.

Those interested have 16-plus days to sign up for the September box. You can watch a Comic Bento unboxing video and review below.

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Muradov makes GN debut with ‘(In a Sense) Lost and Found’

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After a series of short stories in anthologies like MySpace Dark Horse Presents, Chameleon and The Anthology Project Vol. 2cartoonist Roman Muradov is making his debut as a long-form storyteller next month with (In a Sense) Lost and Found.

In the graphic novel, from boutique publisher Nobrow, Muradov uses his flowing illustrative style to follow a young woman on a quest to find something she lost and tries to decide whether she even wants it to begin with. Saying more about the plot would spoil the book, but it’s only part of the appeal of the cartoonist’s work here.

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Tor.com presents a new ‘Wrenchies’ story by Farel Dalrymple

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This week brought the release of one of my most-anticipated graphic novels of the year — The Wrenchies, by Farel Dalrymple of Omega the Unknown, Pop Gun War, Prophet and It Will All Hurt fame. Available now from First Second, the book begins by telling the story of a demented future where a gang of children, The Wrenchies, battle the evil shadowsmen.

If you’d like to get a taste of what to expect from the book, Tor.com is now hosting a 10-page webcomic called “Remainder.” Created by Dalrymple, the story tells the tale of Leking Snipes, who has been transformed into a man with a gun … and the head of a bug. Go check it out.

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Ellis and Allred’s Bacardi graphic novel debuts online

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Warren Ellis and Michael Allred’s collaboration The Spirit of Bacardi, which retraces the history of the company, has made its online debut.

As we noted last month, the graphic novel — commissioned by Bacardi — focuses on Emilio Bacardi, son of Bacardi creator Don Facundo Bacardí Massó, “and his tireless work for Cuban independence from Spain in the late 1800s.” Emilio Bacardí was imprisoned and exiled, but eventually became the first freely elected mayor of Santiago de Cuba.

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SDCC | Scholastic to publish ‘Bone’ tribute edition

Bone: Out From Boneville

Bone: Out From Boneville

Scholastic’s Graphix graphic novel imprint turns 10 next year, and editorial director David Saylor announced at Comic-Con International that the imprint will kick off its anniversary with a new edition of its launch title, Jeff Smith’s Bone #1: Out from Boneville.

The new edition will include a new poem by Smith, illustrated in full color, as well as Bone tribute art from 16 creators, including Craig Thompson (Blankets, Habibi), Raina Telgemeier (Smile, Sisters), Kate Beaton (Hark! A Vagrant), Dav Pilkey (Captain Underpants) Jeffrey Brown (Vader’s Little Princess) and Kazu Kibuishi (Amulet).

The new edition will be published simultaneously in the United States and Canada.

In addition to Bone, Graphix is the publisher of Telgemeier’s Smile, Drama and the upcoming Sisters, Kibuishi’s Amulet and Doug TenNapel’s Bad Island and Cardboard. Seven Graphix books have made The New York Times graphic books bestseller list, and Sisters is likely to join them, as it is debuting with an initial print run of 200,000.

Saylor made the announcement Thursday night at Scholastic’s Comic-Con party, where Smith and most of the contributing artists were present. The poem was projected on a wall above the venue.

Comics get fashionable with biography of Christian Dior

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Christian Dior is best known in modern times as a fashion brand, but before that it was a man — and one of France’s foremost cartoonists tells his life story in the graphic novel Girl in Dior. The latest work of Annie Goetzinger, and the first to be published in English, it’s set for release in February by NBM Publishing.

First published last year in France by by Dargaud, Girl in Dior looks at the fashion couturier through the eyes of a young woman named Clara. Beginning with Dior’s first show in 1947 and continuing through his life’s work, the graphic novel mixes straightforward biographical storytelling with an intensive look at the fashion world and the fashions of Dior himself.

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