Graphic Novels Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Top Shelf reveals SDCC exclusives from Lemire and Campbell

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Top Shelf Productions describes its pair of Comic-Con International exclusives as “jaw-dropping,” and it’s tough to argue with that.

The first is a gorgeous deluxe slipcase edition of Essex County, collecting Jeff Lemire’s award-winning trilogy about life in a rural community in Southwestern Ontario. This foil-stamped edition features a letterpress bookplate signed and numbered by Lemire.

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College declines student’s request to ban ‘Persepolis,’ ‘Sandman’

persepolisFollowing a student’s protest over the contents of the graphic novels required by her English 250 class, Crafton Hills College President Cheryl A. Marshall has issued a statement saying the college will not ban any books or alter the content of the course.

I support the college’s policy on academic freedom which requires an open learning environment at the college.  Students have the opportunity to study controversial issues and arrive at their own conclusions and faculty are to support the student’s right to freedom of inquiry.  We want students to learn and grow from their college experiences; sometimes this involves reaffirming one’s values while other times beliefs and perspectives change.  In this specific case, the syllabus distributed on the first day of class contained the list of required reading materials allowing students the opportunity to research the books and make a choice about the class.  The class is one of numerous electives available for completion of the English degree.  We are attempting to avoid this situation in the future and Professor Bartlett has agreed to include a disclaimer on the syllabus in the future so students have a better understanding of the course content.  I know he appreciated the differing views presented by Ms. Shultz in his class.

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Student, parents want college to ban ‘Sandman,’ ‘Persepolis,’ more

sandman-dolls houseCollege student Tara Shultz is the latest in a long line of people to be shocked to find that Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi’s graphic memoir about growing up during the Iranian revolution, contains violence.

A 20-year-old attending Crafton Hills College in Yucaipa, California, was so dismayed by the graphic content in four of the graphic novels required by her English 250 course — official description: “the study of the graphic novel as a viable medium of literature through readings, in-class discussion and analytical assignments” — that she and her parents are seeking to have them banned by the administration.

In addition to Persepolis, Shultz took exception to Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, the first volume of Brian K. Vaughan and Pia Guerra’s Y: The Last Man, and Neil Gaiman, Mike Dringenberg & Co.’s The Sandman: The Doll’s House, due to the depictions of sex, violence and “obscenities.”

“I didn’t expect to open the book and see that graphic material within,” she told the Redlands Daily Facts. “I expected Batman and Robin, not pornography.”

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‘Kramers Ergot’ 9 will arrive next spring

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The Kramers Ergot anthology, edited by Sammy Harkham, has had an irregular publication history, with long spaces between volumes and a different publisher every few years. The oversized Kramers Ergot 7, which stood almost two feet tall, was released in 2008 by Buenaventura Press, and Kramers Ergot 8 came out in 2012 from the now-defunct art publisher PictureBox.

So it’s big news that a new volume is on the way, this time from Fantagraphics.

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Sonny Liew’s graphic novel sells out after government pulls grant

The Art of Charlie Chan Hock ChyeCall it the Streisand Effect, Singapore-style: Sonny Liew’s graphic novel The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye has sold out at bookstores across Singapore after the National Arts Council pulled its funding from the book at the last minute, citing “sensitive content.”

The book had an initial press run of 1,000 copies, and all 500 of the copies allotted to Books Kinokuniya Singapore are gone. Other bookstores also report a run on the book, and the publisher has no more copies in the warehouse; a second printing is planned. Publisher Edmund Wee of Epigram Books attributed the sellout to a combination of the controversy and Liew’s popularity. To give an idea of the scale of graphic novel sales in Singapore, a typical Epigram book sells about 500 copies a year.

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Russian bookstores pull ‘Maus’ amid ‘Nazi propaganda’ crackdown

mausMoscow bookstores have quickly but quietly removed the Pulitzer Prize-winning graphic novel Maus out of fear the swastika on the cover will violate a four-month-old law banning “Nazi propaganda.”

Agence France-Presse reports the move comes as Russian authorities seek to purge the capital of swastikas and other Nazi insignias ahead of May 9, which marks the 70th anniversary of the Soviet victory over German forces in World War II. Raids have already been conducted on toy and antique shops, and bookstore owners are anticipating similar actions.

Of course, Art Spiegelman’s celebrated Maus, released in Russia in 2013, isn’t “Nazi propaganda”; it’s pointedly anti-fascist, telling a story about the horrors of Nazism. However, bookstore owners appear to be erring on the side of caution, figuring the large swastika on the cover is enough to make the title — and retailers — a target.

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Fantagraphics teases new Dan Clowes graphic novel

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If you thought teaser images and announcements of announcements were strictly the domain of superhero publishers, think again.

Fantagraphics Books raised the subject of Daniel Clowes’ next graphic novel with a teaser image posted on its Twitter page:

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Hells Angel veteran writes biker tale ‘Lucifer’s Sword MC’

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In comics it’s hard sometimes to get authenticity — where are you going to find a real superhero with superpowers? — but a recent release in the burgeoning biker genre has done that.

Lucifer’s Sword MC: Life and Death in an Outlaw Motorcycle Club is a graphic novel written by Phil Cross, a 46-year veteran of the Hells Angels Motorcycle Club. Published by Motorbooks, which specializes in books about the biker lifestyle, Lucifer’s Sword MC rides on the success of FX’s Sons of Anarchy (both in television and the BOOM! Studios’ licensed comic), but offers a more raw, and less glitzy, look at the “one percenters.”

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Congressman John Lewis and ‘March’ hit ‘The Daily Show’

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In what Top Shelf Productions describes as possibly “the first — and the last — time Jon Stewart ever features a graphic novel,” Congressman John Lewis appeared last night on The Daily Show, where he discussed meeting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., the 50th anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” and his memoir of the civil rights movement March.

“People must understand,” Lewis said, “and that’s why we did [these] two books here, March Book One and Book Two, to tell the story, so our young people — our children and their children — will understand what happened and never forget it.”

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Officials question how ‘Palomar’ ended up in high school library

palomarFollowing a complaint from a parent, officials at a New Mexico school district are investigating how a copy of Gilbert Hernandez’s Palomar became part of a high school library’s collection.

Catreena Lopez told KOAT Albuquerque she was disturbed by the “pornographic” images she found in the graphic novel, which her 14-year-old son reportedly checked out Wednesday from the Rio Rancho High School library, thinking it might be manga.

Flipping through the 500-page Fantagraphics hardcover, which collects all of Hernandez’s inarguably mature-themed “Heartbreak Soup” stories from Love & Rockets, Lopez flagged 30 illustrations she considered to be pornographic.

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IDW to collect Alex Toth’s ‘Bravo for Adventure’ for first time

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IDW Publishing will collect Bravo for Adventure, a rarely seen story legendary artist Alex Toth, as part of its Library of American Comics.

Out of print for three decades, the original 48-page story about “knock-about pilot and reluctant swashbuckler” Jesse Bravo was created for a French publisher, but a planned graphic novel was never released. It was later serialized in Warren Publishing’s comics magazine The Rook before reappearing again, with additional Jesse Bravo short stories, at a couple of other publishers. Toth never completed his full story.

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Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá unveil ‘Two Brothers’

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Brothers Fábio Moon and Gabriel Bá have finally pulled back the curtain on the follow-up to their award-winning Daytripper collaboration: Two Brothers, due in October from Dark Horse.

An adaptation of the novel The Brothers by Brazilian author Milton Hatoum, the graphic novel centers on a strained family relationship.

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YALSA announces 2015 Great Graphic Novels for Teens

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The Young Adult Library Services Association has announced its 2015 Great Graphic Novels for Teens, a list of 79 titles that range from biography and humor to science fiction and superheroes.

The finalists were selected by a committee from among 108 official nominations recommended for readers ages 12 to 18. From those 79 titles, 10 were singled out as exemplifying “the quality and range of graphic novels appropriate for teen audiences.” They are:

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First Second to release Andy Hirsch’s all-ages Western ‘Varmints’

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First Second Books has announced it will publish Varmints, an all-ages graphic novel by Dallas-based Andy Hirsch, whose credits include The Royal Historian of Oz and BOOM! Studios’ Garfield, Peanuts and Adventure Time.

ROBOT 6 also has a first look at the Western, which began in 2011 as a self-published digital comic, and a brief Q&A with Hirsch.

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Drawn & Quarterly announces Adrian Tomine’s ‘Killing and Dying’

tomine-killing and dyingDrawn & Quarterly has announced the October release of Killing and Dying, the newest collection of Adrian Tomine’s long-running  Optic Nerve series. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the cartoonist’s acclaimed comic.

“D+Q first published Adrian Tomine’s comics in 1995 and in the ensuing two decades it’s been a real privilege to see how he has continued to evolve as an artist, a writer, and overall as a cartoonist,” publisher Chris Oliveros said in a statement. “Killing and Dying just might be my favorite book by Adrian. We’ve come to expect from him an eloquent visual sensibility and insightful, complex storytelling, but there’s something else going on here: these stories are darkly funny, and they’re tinged with a very particular acerbic wit that we haven’t seen all too often before this.”

In an interview with The New Yorker, Tomine reflects on the evolution of Optic Nerve — he began self-publishing the comic at age 16 — and why he’s stuck with the “pamphlet” format.

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