Graphic Novels Archives - Page 2 of 9 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Watch Paul Pope talk ‘Escapo’ inspirations and new edition

escapo

To help promote the April 14 release of the new edition of Paul Pope’s long-out-of-print 1999 graphic novel Escapo, Z2 Comics has released a video in which the artist describes his vision of the book, and more.

“[It's] my attempt at at making an incredible Fellini meets Jack Kirby mash-up comic book, y’know, like the artist who escapes death,” he explains. “I thought it was time to do something really serious, y’know. I was really into Nick Cave at the time, and the Murder Ballads album came out, and he had ‘Stagger Lee’ and ‘Henry Lee’ and all of these beautiful songs, and it’s like, ‘Man, I think I can do something like this in comics.’”

The new edition, which Pope refers to as “a new book,” is redesigned in the French BD format by Jim Pascoe, and boasts colors by Shay Plummer, more than 50 pages of bonus content, pin-ups by other artists and a two-page alternate ending previously seen only in the French edition.

Continue Reading »


Jeffrey Brown shows that ‘Kids Are Weird’ in new book trailer

Screen Shot 2014-02-16 at 9.38.32 AM

Chronicle Books will release Jeffrey Brown’s latest graphic novel, Kids Are Weird, next month, and to promote it they’ve released a video trailer.

While the creator has been focused on the Star Wars universe lately — and in fact has a new Star Wars-themed book featuring more adventures of Daddy Darth Vader and little Luke and Leia coming soon — Kids Are Weird returns Brown to his home planet and his observations about his own kid.

Continue Reading »

Get a peek at ‘The Graveyard Book,’ by P. Craig Russell & Co.

graveyard-book-v1-cropped

Courtesy of Neil Gaiman, we’re treated to an all-too-brief preview, with the covers, of P. Craig Russell’s adaptation of The Graveyard Book, the author’s award-winning 2008 children’s novel.

Russell, a longtime Gaiman collaborator, is joined on the two-volume graphic novel by an impressive roster of artists, each illustrating one chapter: Kevin Nowlan, Tony Harris, Scott Hampton, Galen Showman, Jill Thompson and Stephen B. Scott on the first book, and David Lafuente, Hampton, Nowlan and Showman on the second.

The first volume will be released on July 29, followed by the second on Sept. 30.

Continue Reading »

Koyama Press announces fall titles, new children’s line

Distance_Mover_Patrick_KyleKoyama Press’ latest announcement arrived in my in-box while I was on my way home from Angoulême, so I’m just now getting around to it, but it’s impressive enough to merit a bit of belated blogging.

As Koyama Press is a small publisher, the list is short: six titles all together, four for adults and two for kids. But there’s some interesting range to it, and the books are packaged attractively and displayed in a way that makes you want to read each one for different reasons, which isn’t necessarily the case if you’re just looking at a stack of random art-comix. One thing I really enjoyed, as I was reading through their catalog descriptions, was their use of high-concept blurbs. “Richard Scarry and Rube Goldberg collide in John Martz’s whimsical comic book world.” Bring it on!

While children’s comics may seem like a stretch, it’s one of the fastest growing sectors of the comics market, and one can see a niche for books that appeal to children and adults on different levels (such as Luke Pearson’s Hilda books, published by Nobrow Press) and for children’s books that are far off the commercial beaten track. The challenge will be to get them in front of parents and children who aren’t regular readers of The Comics Journal. It will be interesting to see if librarians climb on board; that could be a game-changer.

Anyway, here’s the list:

Continue Reading »


YALSA unveils the 2014 Great Graphic Novels for Teens

adventures of superhero girlThe Young Adult Library Association has announced its 2014 Great Graphic Novels for Teens, a list of 78 titles that range from history and autobiography to superheroes and mystery.

The finalists were selected by a committee from among 122 nominees recommended for readers ages 12 to 18. From those 55 titles, 10 were singled out for exemplifying “the quality and range of graphic novels appropriate for teen audiences.”

The are:

Continue Reading »

ALA’s GLBT Round Table honors gay-themed graphic novels

julios dayGay-themed graphic novels were recognized during American Library Association’s Midwinter Meeting in Philadelphia in a pair of lists for adult and younger readers.

The Over the Rainbow Project, sponsored by the ALA’s Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual and Transgender Round Table, announced its 2014 book list, containing works recommended for adults that “exhibit commendable literary quality and significant LGBT content.” Six titles were selected in the Graphic Narrative category:

  • 7 Miles a Second, by David Wojnarowicz, Marguerite Van Cook and James Romberger (Fantagraphics)
  • Anything That Loves: Comics Beyond “Gay” and “Straight,” edited by Charles “Zan” Christensen and Carol Queen (Northwest Press)
  • Blue is the Warmest Color, by Julie Maroh; translated by Ivanka Hahnenberger (Arsenal Pulp Press)
  • Calling Dr. Laura: A Graphic Memoir, by Nicole J. Georges (Houghton Mifflin)
  • Julio’s Day, by Gilbert Hernandez (Fantagraphics)
  • Spit and Passion, by Cristy C. Road (The Feminist Press)

The Rainbow Project, a joint committee of the GLBT Round Table and the Social Responsibilities Round Table, highlighted five graphic novels on its list of graphic novels for teens:

Continue Reading »

YA author Rainbow Rowell inks deal with First Second

Photo by Augusten Burroughs

Photo by Augusten Burroughs

Rainbow Rowell, author of the acclaimed young-adult novels Eleanor & Park and Fangirl, has signed a two-book deal with First Second, EW.com reports. Faith Erin Hicks (Friends With Boys, The Adventures of Superhero Girl) will illustrate the first of the two graphic novels.

“I started reading Faith’s graphic novels this summer. … And her work just clicked with me, especially Friends With Boys,” Rowell said in a statement to the website. “Her style is so expressive — dense with feeling and meaning. She tells you so much in every panel, even when she isn’t telling you anything. I really crave creative collaboration — that’s a theme in Fangirl and Landline — and I’m so excited to get to work with someone I respect as much as Faith.”

Published in February 2013, Eleanor & Park centers on two misfit teens in 1986 Nebraska who become friends, and then more, through a shared love of comics and ’80s alternative music while dealing with issues of race, class and abuse. It was honored just this week with a 2014 Michael L. Printz Award for excellence in young adult literature.

Rowell followed that novel in September with Fangirl (it sports a cover by Noelle Stevenson), a coming-of-age story about fan fiction and first love, centers on Cath and Wren, twins with a shared, longtime devotion to the Simon Snow novels. But when Wren, who’s drifted away from fandom, announces she doesn’t want to be college roommates with her sister, Cath finds herself on her own.


First Second unveils books by Doctorow, Wang and Dalrymple

InRealLifeIt’s been a busy week for First Second: Following on its announcement of The Stratford Zoo, which features animals staging a production of Macbeth, the publisher has revealed two more graphic novels.

InRealLife, written by Corey Doctorow and illustrated by Jen Wang, is a story about the human side of gaming—specifically, the “gold farmers” who make real-world money from gaming. Based in part on the experiences of Doctorow’s wife, who was a high-level gamer in the 1990s, the book revolves around a teenager named Anda who’s recruited into a fictional multiplayer online game, Coarsegold, and ends up as a player in the game’s underground economy.

The graphic novel will explore attitudes about gaming and gamers, and, Doctorow says in an interview at Kotaku, there is a larger point:

When you contemplate the microscale phenomenon of a world-in-a-bottle like an MMO and the toy economy within it, it equips you with a graspable metaphor for understanding the macroscale world of monetary policy. In other words: thinking about gold farming is a gateway drug to thinking about money itself.

Continue Reading »

Derf announces ‘Trashed’ graphic novel

dert-trashedDerf Backderf, creator of the acclaimed memoir My Friend Dahmer, has signed a deal with Abrams Books to publish his next graphic novel, based on his webcomic Trashed.

“This past summer, I took down most of the Trashed Webcomic, announced it was permanently retired and instead unveiled an entirely new webcomic, The Baron of Prospect Ave.,” he wrote on his blog. “What I couldn’t reveal at the time was that Abrams had approached me about turning the Trashed Webcomic into a full-fledged graphic novel! I already had a couple new episodes written at that point, with the intention of starting the project up anew this past summer. So those became part of the new book. I spent the remainder of 2013 writing and drawing.”

Trashed, in its original form, was released in 2002 by SLG Publishing; it’s a comic memoir of the year he spent as a garbageman in his rural hometown. When he revisited the project in 2010 as a webcomic, he added fictional characters and situations. As he explained on his website, “It didn’t really happen but, trust me, it’s all too real.”

Continue Reading »

Fantagraphics announces two new Lucy Knisley books

age-of-license-coverLucy Knisley was the toast of comics last year for her graphic-novel memoir Relish, so the announcement that Fantagraphics will publish her next two books is big news.

Both books are travel stories. The first, An Age of License, is the tale of Lucy’s trip through Europe, where she apparently has all sorts of adventures, meditates on the meaning of life and finds love. It’s due out this fall and will be about 200 pages, black and white with some color.

In the second book, Displacement, Lucy takes her grandparents on a cruise, meditates on the meaning of life and “tries to hold her family together,” which sounds intriguing. This graphic novel will also be black and white with some color.

There are a couple of things about this announcement that are worth noting. First is the move from First Second, which published Relish, to Fantagraphics. First Second gave Relish a strong marketing push — for a while it seemed there was a Lucy Knisley interview somewhere, often in a major publication, every single day, and she did a book tour as well. I think that’s helpful to a young creator, and I hope she’s able to stay on a roll with Fantagraphics.

The other thing is format. Relish had a lush feeling because it was in full color. To me, a black-and-white or black-and-white-with-color format signals a different type of book, maybe something a bit more serious, a bit more literary. It works well for many of Fantagraphics’ titles, as it did for Knisley’s first book, French Milk, and it will be interesting to see how it changes the feel of her work.

Fall is a long ways away, so while you wait, check out Knisley’s sporadically updated webcomic, Stop Paying Attention, which is funny and perceptive and really shows what she is capable of.

The full press release can be found below.

Continue Reading »

SelfMadeHero unveils publishing plans for spring 2014

Vincent

Vincent

British publisher SelfMadeHero earlier today announced its publishing plans for the first few months of 2014. They include a biography of painter Vincent van Gogh by Dutch artist Barbara Stok, a political satire set during the Iraq War by Abel Lanzac and Christophe Blain (!), the true story of boxer Hertzko Haft, who survived Auschwitz to become a heavyweight prize-fighter, and a collaboration between David Camus and Nick Abadzis (Laika, Hugo Tate) that involves Orson Welles and a Cuban cigar-roller.

Earlier the company announced plans to publish Rob Davis’ The Motherless Oven and Black Francis’ The Good Inn in 2014.

You can find the full descriptions below.

Continue Reading »

John & Luke Holden’s ‘Detrimental Information’ to debut at TCAF

cover-test-preview

Small press publisher 2D Cloud will have two new books debut at this year’s Toronto Comics Arts Festival. One of those is Rudy by Mark Connery, which we mentioned on Wednesday. The other is Detrimental Information by John and Luke Holden. Critic and blogger Rob Clough describes the Holdens as ”two brothers with a touch for the bizarre and grotesque” and “a deadpan, absurd sense of humor perfectly offset by the scrawled, often manic nature of their linework.”

2D Publisher Raighne Hogan provided us with a eight-page preview of their upcoming book, which is expected to arrive in stores in the spring. Check it out below.

Continue Reading »

Abrams to publish ‘Climate Changed’ by Philippe Squarzoni

Climate_Changed

Science and comics have proved a popular combination lately, as more and more cartoonists here and abroad attempt to tackle real-life topics that don’t involve their love lives (not that there’s anything wrong with that). The latest entry in this category will come in April when Abrams releases Climate Changed: A Personal Journey through the Science by French author Philippe Squarzoni.

The book, which will be 480 pages and cost $24.95, will examine what exactly global warming and its effects are while asking whether we have the ability to stave off the dire predictions that some make. Nonfiction is no stranger to Squarzoni, who has previously completed books about Central American politics and author Richard Brautigan, and this promises to be a highly detailed, heavily researched book.

After the jump you can read Abrams’ official press release:

Continue Reading »

SelfMadeHero to publish Rob Davis’ ‘The Motherless Oven’

covertrial9

One of the real thrills of the U.K.’s graphic novel renaissance of recent years has been the reemergence of Rob Davis as a major talent. Both his short works for various sources (like “My Family And Other Gypsies” and “How I Built My Father”) and the longer-form Nelson, the format-busting anthology he co-steered to the prize for Best Book at the first British Comics Awards in 2012, reveal an artist whose greatest theme might be familial dysfunction. Davis’ next work will be The Motherless Oven, which looks like it’ll also be mining that rich seam of material. It’ll be released by SelfMadeHero, the U.K. imprint that published Davis’s impressive adaptation of Cervantes’ Don Quixote.

Here’s how editor Dan Lockwood describes the book:

Continue Reading »

Exclusive preview | ‘What We Need to Know’ by Willy Linthout

need2knowReaching across the Atlantic, Canadian publisher Conundrum Press will publish What We Need to Know by Belgian cartoonist Willy Linthout in May.

Linthout’s first book on these shores was The Years of the Elephant, about a father trying to cope with his son’s suicide, published in 2010 by Fanfare/Ponent Mon. This new book, Conundrum’s description notes, is a sequel to Years, which won the Flemish Bronzen Adhemar.

[What We Need to Know] uses a wide-angle lens to encompass the entire family, specifically three brothers who each need to cope with their own ghosts. The style of both these autobiographical books is done in pencils without inks, in other words a rough and unfinished look, which perfectly matches the psychological state of the characters. Fortunately, they can consult “The Book” in emergencies. In that magic reference work, the famous artist WL’s mother has collected innumerable facts, recipes, and advice, in essence, what we need to know about life.

Conundrum was kind enough to provide us with a preview of the book, which you can see below.

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives