Interview Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

When aliens make amends: Nolan T Jones on ‘Colonial Souls’

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After lifetimes spent conquering alien species, what happens when a race of humanoid bugs finds itself about to die out, and is forced to work with others to survive? That’s part of the premise of Colonial Souls by Nolan T Jones and Andrew MacLean, a four-issue science fiction series Jones is self-publishing digitally.

The first issue arrived earlier this month, and the second went live this morning on the comics’ website (where you can also find previews of both issues). In addition to buying single issues, you can also get a price break by opting to purchase a subscription to the full series.

I spoke with Nolan about the comic, its distribution method and his other projects, including the role-playing website roll20.net.

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New book celebrates 30 years of Voltron

Voltron 30th anniversary coverJust as Voltron was assembled from other robots, the original Voltron television series was put together from several different Japanese anime — and it benefited in part from a happy accident.

Debuting in September 1984, the hugely popular cartoon was developed by World Events Productions, a small television production company based in St. Louis, Missouri. Several WEP executives had gone to a licensing convention and saw three Japanese shows they thought would do well in the United States. They requested the master tapes of all three, but Toei Company sent the wrong tapes for one of them, interpreting the request for the “one with the lion” as Beast King GoLion, although the WEP team had actually meant a different show. Ted Koplar, president and CEO of WEP, liked what he saw, recalling, “There was a human side that grabbed me.” Indeed, it became the most popular Voltron cartoon, Lion Force Voltron.

Last month, Viz Media released Voltron: From Days of Long Ago, a 30th anniversary commemorative book that includes a behind-the-scenes history of the show, photos of the many Voltron toys, and a guidebook to the characters and storylines. I spoke with Traci Todd, senior editor for children’s publishing at Viz and a huge Voltron fan herself, and Beth Kawasaki, senior editorial director, about went into the making of the book.

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Catching up with Roger Langridge at Small Press Expo

Roger Langridge 2 for webWhile at Small Press Expo in Bethesda, Maryland, I had the pleasure to chat briefly with Roger Langridge, creator of Fred the Clown and the Eisner Award-winning Snarked!

I spoke with the former Muppet Show cartoonist about his current projects — a return to BOOM! Studios with The Musical Monsters of Turkey Hollow and his creator-owned Abigail and the Snowman –  what he likes about SPX, and what awesome comics he found at show. He came up with a doozie!

Brigid Alverson: Why are you here at SPX?

Roger Langridge: SPX is the first American convention I ever came to, in 2000.

What book were you debuting there?

I wasn’t! I was in the country with my wife, and we were visiting New York together, and we thought we would work in a trip to SPX while we were here. We came just to see it and to check it out and see what it was like. I was at that point working on Fred the Clown as a webcomic, and I showed it around to a few people, and it really fired me up to do self-publishing. The next year I was planning to debut Fred the Clown at SPX 2001, and of course that’s the one that was canceled because of 9/11. But that got me self-publishing, which is pretty much why I have a career today, I think.

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Andres Salazar talks ‘Pariah Missouri,’ Westerns and Kickstarter

Pariah 2Writer Andres Salazar puts a cool spin on the supernatural Western genre in Pariah, Missouri: The town itself anchors the book — Salazar calls it the “main character” — and he uses it as a vantage point to watch the comings and goings of an amazingly varied cast of characters, some with supernatural powers. He and artist Jose Pescador lay out the territory in Book 1, and assemble a sort of 19th-century Mod Squad to fight the forces of evil.

Salazar crowdfunded the first volume of Pariah, Missouri, on Kickstarter, and Diamond Comic Distributors picked it up for July Previews — in fact, it was a Staff Pick—and it’s available in comic shops now. He’s running a Kickstarter campaign to fund the second volume.

Robot 6: What is it about this particular time and place that intrigued you?

Andres Salazar: I wanted something different than a traditional Western, which are post-Civil War stories, usually in the 1880s, after the trains crossed the plains. I wanted it to be in the 1850s, when slavery was still present. Missouri had a unique position in the country as having both slaves and free blacks, so I wanted to explore those social dynamics. I grew up in Arkansas and traveled to Missouri many times, and there’s something special about the Midwest that I wanted to explore. It was the frontier in the 1850s, and a hotbed of various religions and folk magic. Lastly, I’m a fan of Mark Twain and his stories on the steamboats, and I wanted Pariah to be that mysterious steamboat boomtown.

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Dylan Todd and company reveal the future in ‘2299’ anthology

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You might not have realized it at the time, but if you’ve read Avengers A.I., Five Ghosts or just about any issue of a Monkeybrain comic, you’ve seen the work of Dylan Todd. As a designer, Todd has touched a lot of comics, from the recap pages in Avengers A.I. to the logos for Monkeybrain Comics, White Suits, Five Ghosts and Sovereign, to name a few.

Now Todd has teamed with a bunch of writers and artists to create 2299, an anthology of 11 stories set in the far future — 2299, to be exact. ROBOT 6 spoke with Todd about the project, which you can download now for $2 from Gumroad.

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David Ball delves into ‘Critical Approaches to Comics Artists’

David Ball

David Ball

I have a good deal of admiration and respect for the author and professor David Ball, so when he tweets me that he’s editing a new series of books to be published by the University Press of Mississippi, I snap to attention.

And, indeed he is. Modeled on a book he co-edited with Martha Kuhlman, The Comics of Chris Ware: Drawing is a Way of Thinking, Critical Approaches to Comics Artists will be an ongoing series, each volume collecting  essays from a variety of scholars on a particular cartoonist. The plan is to release two books a year, with the first book on Joe Sacco coming out in 2015. Future volumes will focus on Herge, Charles Schulz and George Herriman.

Actually, this is apparently rather old news, as Ball blogged about this stuff more than a year ago. Still, it was news to me, so I took the opportunity to quiz him over email about this series and his hopes for it.

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SDCC | Fantagraphics to publish Liz Suburbia’s ‘Sacred Heart’

SacredHeartCoverFantagraphics announced today at Comic-Con International that it will publish Liz Suburbia’s webcomic Sacred Heart as a one-shot graphic novel.

Sacred Heart is set in a small town where all the adults have mysteriously disappeared and the teenagers rule. The situation is not total anarchy, and that’s one of the things that makes it so interesting — order has broken down in some ways but not in others. It’s been running online for a number of years, but Suburbia is completely redrawing the comic and Fantagraphics will publish it in a single volume— although the cartoonist says there will be more to come.

ROBOT 6 spoke with Suburbia about Sacred Heart and how it has evolved so far.

Brigid Alverson: Sacred Heart is about a town that seems to be full of high-school kids but no adults or younger children. Can you give us an idea about what’s going on?

In the first draft (the one that’s online) it’s kind of a secret, but in the final print version it’s more clear that their parents left almost four years ago and promised to return in about four years’ time.

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Talking ‘Barnaby': An interview with co-editors Eric Reynolds and Phil Nel

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For many fans and historians, Crockett Johnson’s Barnaby was largely regarded as the best comic strip you never read. Or, if you knew where to look, the best comic you only read a few snatches of.

All that changed last year when Fantagraphics began collecting the strip in a series of handsome volumes, designed by Dan Clowes and edited by Fantagraphics associate publisher Eric Reynolds and Philip Nel, author of Crockett Johnson and Ruth Krauss: How an Unlikely Couple Found Love, Dodged the FBI, and Transformed Children’s Literature.

The second volume just arrived in stores this week, which made it seem like the perfect opportunity to talk to Nel and Reynolds a bit about Barnaby, what makes it so swell, its legacy, and more. I want to thank them for their time and patience, especially considering this whole thing took place over the Internet.

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Made in Japan: Cummings and Zub talk ‘Wayward’

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In 2010, UDON Entertainment published Vent, an anthology/art book celebrating the company’s 10th anniversary. Artist Steven Cummings contributed a piece of art to the collection, which at the time caught the eye of Jim Zub.

“I asked him, ‘What is this? Are you doing anything with this?'” the writer told Comic Book Resources, “and he said, ‘Oh, I had this idea I wanted to do – something supernatural set in Japan, but I don’t know much of how it would work beyond that.'”

Their conversations grew into Wayward, a creator-owned series by Zub, Cummings and colorist John Rauch debuting Aug. 27 from Image Comics this summer. Cummings and Zub were kind enough to answer some questions and share artwork from the series. To see more of Cummings’ artwork, be sure to check out his deviantART site.

Robot 6: Steve, I’ll start with you. How long have you been living in Japan, and where exactly do you live?

Steven Cummings: I like to tell people that I live in almost-Tokyo to keep down the offers of random people to “visit” me (and who really just want to stay somewhere for free during their Tokyo vacation). It’s just outside the window, beckoning at me but not so close that I have to pay the Tokyo taxes. I think I am going on my 10th year here total. I was a student back in the late ’90s and early 2000s, and lived up in Saitama and only moved back stateside when I started getting offers from publishers to draw comics.

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‘I’m not afraid of revising': Chatting with ‘Angie Bongiolatti’ author Mike Dawson

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Having detailed his love affair with Queen, delved into the secret lives of boy scouts and even produced the odd superhero comicMike Dawson has released his most ambitious book yet, the politically and socially charged Angie Bongiolatti.

tumblr_n5ziggSU5g1soutgdo4_1280Set only a few months after 9/11, the book centers around a group of twentysomethings, more or less fresh out of college, working at an aspiring dot-com in the Big Apple and trying to figure out what exactly they want to do with their lives. Like satellites, many of them seem to rotate to one degree or another around the titular character, an attractive young woman who is driven by her left-wing political beliefs and trying to ascertain how to adhere to them in the workaday world.

Far from being some sort of one-sided political screed however, Bongiolatti asks  questions about the effectiveness of any political movement, no matter how noble, and how best to affect change in the world while still being able to maneuver through it effectively.

I talked with Dawson over email the last few weeks about the book, its themes, politics and the joys of working with a large cast of characters.

Angie Bongiolatti is set within a very specific place and time, New York immediately after 9/11. What made you decide to set your story during this period rather than, say, during the Iraq War or during the Bush/Gore election. Or later?

The Bush/Gore election was the last time in my life when I was completely and blissfully unaware of current events and had no opinion on what was happening. I had no television set at the time, the Internet wasn’t yet an all-consuming focal point of my life, and plus I was 25 years old, and just didn’t care about the world outside of my own social life.

The period after 9/11 was that short window in time where the rest of the world was more or less on America’s “side” when it came to their response. To be against the invasion of Afghanistan was a minority position to take. The invasion seemed legitimate. I remember there were some voices of dissent at the time – David Rees’ Get Your War On being this great voice screaming into the roaring winds of war. I loved that comic. It might have been the first webcomic I experienced in real time.

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‘I’m fond of that geeky stuff': Chatting with ‘Twelve Gems’ author Lane Milburn

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A weiner dog with butterfly-esque wings that’s a master mechanic. A space-faring Amazonian warrior who’s handy with a blade. A pig-faced, hard-living bounty hunter. Mad scientists with really odd-shaped glasses. These are just some of the characters and elements that make up Twelve Gems, Lane Milburn’s ever-so-slightly tongue-in-cheek sci-fi opera.

Drawing on classic adventure role-playing games, fantasy films and manga, Gems finds the first three aforementioned characters banding together at the request of a mysterious Dr. Z to find the titular gems for purposes unkown (at least initially). Along the way they come across all manner of strange creatures, hostile planets, old foes and metaphysical craziness. Milburn lets his imagination run rampant throughout the book, resulting in a fast-paced, crazed graphic novel full of scenes that could easily be blown up onto a black velvet poster. Plus it’s a lot of fun to boot.

I recently chatted with Milburn about the new book, its inception and his work with the Closed Caption Comics group.

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Eben Burgoon on helping kids make comics at 916 Ink

Eben Burgoon

Eben Burgoon

It’s not unusual for a comics creator to visit a classroom, but the program that Eben Burgoon led for the Sacramento, California, nonprofit 916 Ink was much more than that: a six-week workshop in which elementary school students learned to write comics, then pitched their stories to professional artists who worked with them on the finished product. The workshop included a variety of exercises and techniques, including the “Marvel Method” — Burgoon gave the students pages of finished art and had them fill in the word balloons — and making up the backstory for a random LEGO Minifig.

916 Ink promotes literacy by encouraging young people to write their own stories and poems, and it has published more than 25 books of student work. Its comics program is new and was spurred by demand from both parents and students; the finished work, released this week, will be available in local comics shops, through the 916 Ink website, and eventually through other channels.

We spoke with Burgoon about what he did with the students, how they worked with the artists, and why he thinks comics are a good medium for a literacy program.

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Ian Edginton on mechanical universes and ‘Brass Sun’

Brass Sun 1Brass Sun, by Ian Edginton and INJ Culbard, is a hero’s journey set in a special kind of universe: an orrery, a model of the solar system, created eons ago by a blind clockmaker who set it up so that the different worlds would coexist in peace, giving each one a piece of the key that keeps it moving.

Over the years, power has shifted among the different worlds, and now the universe is starting to wind down, icing up at its extremities. It’s up to Wren, a 12-year-old girl whose grandfather was executed by the quasi-religious authorities for the heresy of speaking about the problem, to locate the missing pieces of the key and reboot the universe. Her quest takes her through a series of adventures in vividly imagined worlds, connected by the brass arms of the giant orrery.

The story originally appeared in the pages of the British weekly 2000AD, but Rebellion/2000AD is re-releasing it as a monthly miniseries for the U.S. market, beginning next week. We spoke with Edginton about the story, and were also provided with a preview of the first issue.

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‘I can’t ever just leave it alone!': Chatting with Noah Van Sciver

AD.YouthIsWasted.cvr_Layout 1“Is Noah Van Sciver the finest cartoonist of his generation?”

That’s the question I posed a few months ago on this very blog. Anyone who’s been following his work, whether via his one-man, self-published anthology Blammo, various minicomics like The Death of Elijah Lovejoy or his critically acclaimed graphic novel about Abraham Lincoln The Hypo would likely be asking something similar. While there is plenty of competition among Van Sciver’s peers for the “finest cartoonist” title, over the past few years he’s consistently made a case for wearing that crown by methodically building a body of work that was engaging, funny, featured sharply detailed characters and encompassed a variety of genres.

Now AdHouse has published Youth Is Wasted, a collection of short stories taken from Blammo, and various other anthologies. It’s a good introduction to Van Sciver’s world for newcomers, as well as a reminder to Hypo readers that he’s not some one-hit wonder.

In honor of the book’s release, I recently chatted with Van Sciver about the new book, as well as his new mini from Oily Comics, The Lizard Laughed.

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Fantagraphics to publish Ed Luce’s ‘Wuvable Oaf': An interview with the author

Ed Luce

Ed Luce

As was revealed Friday on The Comics Reporter, Fantagraphics has announced plans to publish Wuvable Oaf, the heretofore self-published gay romance comic by Ed Luce.

Described in the press release as “Sex and the City but with adorable, ex-wrestler hairy gay men,” the series follows the adventures of Oaf, a former wrestler and multiple cat owner who falls for Eiffel, the lead singer of a black metal band called Ejaculoid. With five issues published so far (in addition to various minis) Wuvable Oaf has been compared to Love and Rockets and Scott Pilgrim.

The book, collecting Wuvable Oaf #0-4, will cost $29.99 and be available in March 2015.

Wanting to learn more about the collection and Luce’s work in general, I chatted with with the artist over a Google doc the other evening about Oaf, how he got into comics, his background as a painter, and the perils of being stereotyped.

Chris Mautner: Give me a little bit of your background. How old are you, where are you from and how did you first become interested in making comics?

Ed Luce: I’m 38, so I kind of came to comics a little later than most.  I spent the better part of 12 years painting and drawing in a more fine arts context.  I was also a college art professor during that time.

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