Manga Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Jiro Taniguchi to be guest at Angoulême comics festival

Jiro Taniguchi

Jiro Taniguchi

Jiro Taniguchi, creator of The Walking Man, A Distant Neighborhood and more than 40 other manga, will be a special guest in January at the 42nd Angoulême International Comics Festival, which will include a major exhibit of his work — the first of its scale in Europe.

Titled “Taniguchi, l’homme qui rêve” (“Taniguchi, the dreaming man”), the exhibition will cover four decades of Taniguchi’s work, which includes the memoir A Zoo in Winter, the conquest-of-Everest tale Summit of the Gods, the time-travel story A Distant Neighborhood, and the mystery The Quest for the Missing Girl.

Not only does Taniguchi’s work span most of the major graphic novel genres, the official press release points out, but he has crossed over to become an author with universal appeal. Indeed, Laurent Duvault, director of international media development for the publishing group Media Participations, told me at this year’s festival that “Taniguchi was the first Japanese artist to have his own area, not in the manga section but in the French section [of bookstores]. It was a graphic novel approach, not a manga approach.” He attributed this in part to the fact that Taniguchi’s work is flipped, so it reads left to right, making it more accessible to readers of European languages. Taniguchi is no stranger to Angoulême: A Distant Neighborhood was awarded the Alph’Art prize for best scenario at the 2003 festival, and he was one of the nominees for the Grand Prix this year.

Taniguchi, who has four new books coming out this year in France, will be present at Angoulême to open the exhibit and participate in the program; after the festival is over, the show will go on tour around France and the rest of Europe.

Design a new food for Toriko to conquer

Corn on the Bone

There are a lot of battle manga, and there are a lot of food manga, but Mitsutoshi Shimabukuro’s Toriko is one of the few where the hero battles the food — literally.

The series, which runs in both the American and Japanese versions of Shonen Jump, is about a gourmet hunter who tracks down the rarest foods in the world. Like the lead character in the foodie manga Oishinbo, Toriko is trying to assemble the greatest meal ever, but that’s where the similarity ends.

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UDON announces line of manga literary adaptations

manga classics

UDON Entertainment will introduce Manga Classics, a new line of adaptations of literary classics geared toward a young-adult audience.

The line launches in August with the release of Victor Hugo’s Les Miserables, featuring art by SunNeko Lee, with an adaptation by Crystal Silvermoon and an English script by Stacy King, and Jane Austen’s Pride & Prejudice, with art by Po Tse and an adaptation King.

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‘One Piece’ has now sold 310 million volumes in Japan

one piece-v74Not that we necessarily required an further evidence of the popularity of One Piece, but now comes word that with the release of its 74th volume, Eiichiro Oda’s pirate manga has sold more than 310 million copies in Japan alone.

It’s worth noting that it was only November when Shueisha Inc. and Viz Media took out newspaper ads trumpeting the 300-million copy milestone (with another 45 million outside of Japan). Earlier that same month, it was revealed that One Piece has sold 130.15 million copies in Japan just since 2009, the year that market research firm Oricon began reporting book sales.

So what’s the secret behind the success of the world’s bestselling manga? Its sometimes-manic mix of action, comedy and sorrow, a seemingly magic formula the 39-year-old Oda attributes his short attention span. “The thing is, I get bored easily,” he told The Japan Times last fall. “So if my manga was just about the action, or comedy, or tear-jerking moments, I would get bored. I change the style of the series to keep up my motivation to draw. [...] Humans can only come up with new ideas when they’ve reached their limits. When I finish a manuscript, I am completely exhausted.”

Oda, who’s been drawing One Piece since 1997, just announced that he’s placing the manga on hiatus for two weeks while he has his tonsils removed. “Since I’m having this surgery anyways, I plan to have a bazooka installed on my shoulder,” he said in a message to fans. “I’ll be back with my body stronger, so I can clear my workload in the latter half of this year. I’ll be right back, so please come play with me again.”

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Viz to publish new ‘Battle Royale’ graphic novel

BattleRoyale-AngelsBorderBefore there was The Hunger Games, there was Battle Royale, the novel, manga and film about a teenagers subjected to a deadly elimination game. And now there’s more.

Viz Media has announced it will publish Battle Royale: Angels’ Border, a new graphic novel by Koushun Takami, author of the original Battle Royale novel. The two-chapter story is complete in a single volume and features artwork by Mioko Ohnishi and Youhei Oguma. It’s a stand-alone story about six of the girls who lock themselves in a lighthouse during the competition, and like all of Battle Royale, it deals with the precarious balance between the need to unite with others and the need to kill them in order to survive.

In the original, an authoritarian government transported a high-school class to a deserted island, gave them deadly weapons and instructed them to fight each other to the death; only one student could survive. Viz published the original novel in 2003, and this year released a new translation, Battle Royale: Remastered, under its Haikasoru science fiction imprint. The manga was published in 2003 by Tokyopop, which re-released it four years later in Ultimate Edition format.

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‘Oishinbo’ editor defends controversial Fukushima story

Oishinbo

Hiroshi Murayama, editor of the popular food manga Oishinbo and managing editor of the weekly magazine Big Comic Spirits, defended the series’ portrayal of possible radiation dangers in the area around the Fukushima nuclear power plant, which was damaged in the March 2011 earthquake.

The story has stirred controversy, resulting in complaints and angry letters from Fukushima government officials and residents, who fear it will lead to prejudice against those who live there and will make Japanese consumers even more wary of food from the region. The series has been suspended indefinitely, although it’s not clear whether that was a response to the controversy or a previously planned hiatus.

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‘Oishinbo’ manga suspended after Fukushima controversy

Oishinbo

Oishinbo

The long-running foodie manga Oishinbo will be suspended after protests from the government and residents of Fukushima prefecture over a storyline that suggests radiation from the damaged nuclear plant there could be making residents ill. Nonetheless, the final chapter of the controversial story arc will run in this week’s issue, according to The Japan Times.

An announcement is scheduled to appear today in Shogakukan’s Big Comic Spirits magazine that the manga will not appear as of May 26. Anime News Network reports the series was scheduled to go on hiatus anyway, so it’s not clear whether the editors are taking advantage of a planned break. In addition to the final chapter, this week’s issue of the manga magazine will include a note from the editor pledging stricter review of storylines; a 10-page section (the link is in Japanese) of interviews with government officials and experts on the topic; and letters from Fukushima residents. In addition, Asahi.com reports the editors have agreed to scrutinize such stories more closely in the future.

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Viz Media to roll out ‘World Trigger’ in print this fall

world trigger

Viz Media has announced the fall release of print editions of World Trigger, the sci-fi action series by Daisuke Ashihara that’s been serialized in the publisher’s digital magazine Weekly Shonen Jump.

Set four years after a mysterious portal to a parallel universe opened in Makado, allowing invincible monsters called Neighbors to invade, World Trigger centers on Osamu Mikhumo, a geeky teen who isn’t necessarily the best of the elite warriors devoted to defend Earth. But with a feisty humanoid Neighbor named Yuma, he’ll co-opt other-dimensional technology to do whatever it takes to fight back. Continue Reading »

Sakuracon | Dark Horse announces CLAMP, Satoshi Kon manga

Legal DrugWhile its colleagues were off at WonderCon Anaheim, Dark Horse’s manga team was busy at SakuraCon making a couple of interesting new title announcements.

The first is CLAMP’s Legal Drug, previously published in the United States by Tokyopop, and the sequel, Drug & Drop. Legal Drug will be published as a three-in-one omnibus, while Drug & Drop will be released as single volumes.

CLAMP is a four-woman creative team with a lot of projects, and Drug & Drop has been put on hiatus twice, but there are two volumes out in Japan so far. The series was big news when it was announced three years ago; at the time, the bet was that Dark Horse would get the license, as it has a number of CLAMP titles in its catalog already. Speaking of which, Dark Horse will also start releasing its other CLAMP titles digitally later this year.

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New manga introduces Japanese kids to the Avengers

avengers-manga1-cropped

Despite a 50-year history, a record-breaking movie and several video games and animated television series, there apparently still are some in Japan who don’t know who the Avengers are. A little surprising, maybe, but that’s what Earth’s Mightiest Heroes discover when they travel to that country in the latest issue of CoroCoro Comic.

Kotaku spotlights the 12-page story from Shogakukan’s monthly manga magazine for elementary school-age boys, which finds Captain America, Iron Man, the Incredible Hulk, Thor, Spider-Man and the Wasp facing several obstacles on unfamiliar shores: Thor can’t get his armor and hammer through customs, the Hulk can’t stomach Japanese food and, worse still, no one is familiar with them.

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Japanese school board pulls ‘Barefoot Gen’ from libraries

Barefoot_Gen_volume_oneFor the second time in less than two years, a Japanese school board has removed Keiji Nakazawa’s Barefoot Gen from school libraries.

The manga is a semi-fictional account of Nakazawa’s experiences during and after the bombing of Hiroshima, and in recent years it has come under attack from some conservatives because of its portrayal of postwar Japan.

In this case, Mayor Hiroyasu Chiyomatsu of Izumisano in Osaka Prefecture told the local school board that the books were problematic not because of the story but because they use outdated and possibly pejorative terms for poor, homeless or mentally ill people.

“Rather than the overall content of the manga, I thought the problem was with certain discriminatory expressions,” Chiyomatsu said. “Because the city of Izumisano as a whole has emphasized human rights education, I told the board of education that there may be a need to provide individual guidance to those students who read the manga.”

The head of the school board, Tatsuhiro Nakafuji, issued a directive in November telling schools to “move the manga from the library to the principal’s office so children cannot lay eyes on it.” Not all schools immediately complied, so in January they were instructed to turn over their copies to the board of education. The initial plan called for the board to return the books on March 20, once schools had come up with some way to provide “guidance” regarding the language in question.

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It’s Goku vs. Luffy in the streets of Tokyo

one piece-dragon ball1

In the battle no one ever expected — Dragon Ball‘s Goku vs. One Piece‘s Monkey D. Luffy — no clear winner emerges, but there is an obvious loser: the sidewalks of Tokyo.

The pretty impressive life-size sculpture is on display through Sunday outside the Shibuya Parco department store to promote the release of J-Stars Victory Vs., the Shonen Jump 45th-anniversary multiplayer fighting game featuring many of the magazine’s most popular characters.

More photos can be found at Game Watch Impress.

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Viz adds ‘Assassination Classroom,’ ‘Resident Evil’ and more

Assassination Classroom, Vol. 1

Assassination Classroom, Vol. 1

Following news that it had acquired the North American rights to Naoki Urasawa’s Master Keaton, Viz Media announced a handful of other releases for the fall and winter, including Yūsei Matsui’s supernatural action/comedy Assassination Classroom and the print edition of Dragon Ball creator Akira Toriyama’s newest work.

Debuting in July 2012, Assassination Classroom centers on a class of misfits who try to kill their new teacher, an alien octopus with bizarre powers who destroyed most of the moon and is threatening to do the same to Earth within a year — unless his students can destroy him first. The series will be available bimonthly in print and digitally from Viz beginning in December.

Previously serialized digitally by Viz, Toriyama’s quirky comedy Jaco the Galactic Patrolman follows a retired scientist who lives alone on a desert island, where he researches time travel. However, that quiet life is interrupted when galactic patrolman Jaco crash-lands on the island and decides to move in. Featuring new, bonus content for Dragon Ball Z, the print edition debuts in January.

Those two manga are joined by One Piece Box Set 2 (November), which includes Vols. 24-46, the third and fourth story arcs of the “Skypiea” and “Water 7″ arcs, as well as the “Strong World” minicomic, and Naoki Serizawa’s Resident Evil, a five-volume prequel to the video game Resident Evil 6 (November).

Viz Media to publish Naoki Urasawa’s ‘Master Keaton’

master keaton1

Viz Media, which has already released Naoki Urasawa’s Monster, 20th Century Boys and Pluto is North America, is adding another work to the list: the post-Cold War thriller Master Keaton.

Produced with Hokusei Katsushika and Urasawa’s frequent collaborator Takashi Nagasaki, the detective drama centers on Taichi Hiraga-Keaton, an archeology professor and former member of the British Special Air Service whose skills serve him well as a rather unorthodox insurance investigator for Lloyd’s of London.

Master Keaton was originally serialized from 1988 to 1994 in Big Comic Original magazine, and inspired a 39-episode anime.

The 12-volume manga will debut in December as part of the Viz’s deluxe Signature imprint, with each $19.99 book featuring 18 pages of full-color art. Read the full announcement below.

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In Little Golden Manga, even human-eating titans are cute

little-golden-attack-on-tit

Whether it’s a sudden shared nostalgia or something in the water, something lately is inspiring artists to reimagine  Little Golden Books. Last month, Gallery Nucleus in Alhambra, California, debuted “Little Golden Tales,” an exhibit that included, among other works, Breaking Bad depicted as a heartwarming scene from those childhood favorites.

And now Matt Reedy is offering his take with his adorable Little Golden Manga, featuring FLCL, Death Note and Attack on Titan for the pre-school set. Nothing could possibly go wrong, right?

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