Quote of the Day Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Quote of the Day | Greg Rucka on fandom, sexism & community

hate coffee t-shirt“What in the name of everlovingfuck is the matter with you? Are you simply stupid? Are you just ignorant? Are you broken? Newsflash: you are owed NOTHING. Not a thing. Not a goddamn thing. This fandom, that fandom, guess what? It doesn’t belong to you.

You don’t own it. You partake in it. It’s called community.

You want something to be your thing, make a club, build a tree-fort, and do us a favor. Don’t come down.”

– writer Greg Rucka, addressing the anti-”fangirls” T-shirt specifically, and the territorial, anti-woman elements of comics fandom generally, in a blog post that should be read in its entirety

(Photo taken by Landry Walker at WonderCon Anaheim)


Quote of the Day | Comics industry’s ‘frozen adolescence’

“No idea has proven more damaging to the comics industry than the myth that its professionals — not just creators, but retailers, even distributors — work for love and not money. It’s a philosophy that has justified exploitation of creators and theft of intellectual property. It’s allowed the entire industry to pass the buck for its failures — from publishers to retailers, and retailers to — for decades. And it’s why the comics industry lingers in a frozen adolescence, clinging to a shrinking target audience like a sea captain railing at the storm — when the real problem is the rotting wood of his own hull.”

Rachel Edidin, former Dark Horse editor turned freelance writer and editor, addressing reactions to Amazon’s announced purchase of comiXology for Wired.com

‘If there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman’

Falcon Halloween costume

Falcon Halloween costume

“When I first got this role I just cried like a baby because I was like, ‘Wow, next Halloween, I’m gonna open the door and there’s gonna be a little kid dressed as the Falcon.’ That’s the thing that always gets me. I feel like everybody deserves that. I feel like there should be a Latino superhero. Scarlett does great representation for all the other girls, but there should be a Wonder Woman movie. I don’t care if they make 20 bucks, if there’s a movie you’re gonna lose money on, make it Wonder Woman. You know what I mean, ’cause little girls deserve that. There’s so many of these little people out here doing awful things for money in the world of being famous. And little girls see that. They should have the opposite spectrum of that to look up to.”

Captain America: The Winter Soldier star Anthony Mackie, discussing playing the Falcon, and the need for more representation of women and minorities in superhero movies

Quote of the day | Timeless, and subversive, Riverdale

live with archie-alex ross“I have a fleece that I wear that has an Archie patch on it, and everywhere I go people will stop me and say ‘Archie, I love Archie!’ I think the teen years are such a universal experience — people are either going through it, looking forward to going through it, not looking forward to going through it, went through hell in high school, loved their high school experience — and somehow Archie and his adventures capture all that. I went to an all-boys prep school and had a pretty good high school experience, I would say, but there’s always something about those stories where I always wished I went to Riverdale High. And I wish I was part of that kind of gang of friends. I don’t know why. But there was something really comforting about it. I also always thought there was something subversive about the brand. I always felt like there was stuff happening right to the right or the left of the panels, and I was always interested in what those stories were.”

– Archie Comics Chief Creative Officer Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa,
on the enduring appeal of the Riverdale gang


Quote of the Day | Yanick Paquette on colorists

swampthing0“For me, above anything else, the quality of my work is imperative. The level of sacrifice required to do this job can only be justified by being proud of its final result. Yet, all my effort as the artist would be insignificant without the care and talent of my most pivotal collaborator; the colorist. By resisting to align its royalties and recognition policy on Marvel, it has become excessively difficult to secure the best colorists for DC projects. In this digital day and age, where often the entire comic visual is a two person operation, it seem aberrant that one of the two won’t receive the royalties or exposure respect they fully deserve. It’s about time we revisit that royalty pie split. And if we find the courage to slaps some annoying last minute advertisement banner on the cover, certainly adding the colorist name there shouldn’t be that challenging.”

Yanick Paquette, former Swamp Thing artist currently working on Wonder Woman: Earth One, sharing on Facebook part of his response to DC Comics’ recent talent survey.

Quote of the Day | Kelly Sue DeConnick on diversity

captain marvel1

“The message that we send when we don’t represent the broader culture in our stories is that ‘You are other.’ … As a community, as an organism, it is a thing that makes us ill. It is actually bad for us.”

Kelly Sue DeConnick, writer of Captain Marvel and Pretty Deadly, speaking about the need to diversity the kinds of characters that appear in comics, at the “Broadening Comics Readership” panel at Emerald City Comicon

Quote of the Day | ‘You get better with time’

hellboy-seed of destruction1“It is dreadful. But, this is what happens: You get better with time. I actually have been looking at it the last couple of days because I’m writing something where I have to reference things that happen in that first issue. The voice isn’t there. John [Byrne] and I had a completely different take on what the writing should be like on it. We didn’t have different ideas from each other, but together we’d agreed on this approach to the writing of it. It worked fine, but I realized after doing it that it wasn’t the book I had in mind.

It’s pretty primitive, and yet it does present all my ideas. It’s not like at some point I said, ‘Oh, we’ve gotta ignore everything that’s gone before!’ It’s one of the things I’m proudest of looking at 20 years worth of this stuff. I didn’t write myself into any corners, I didn’t have to hit any reset buttons, I’m still referencing things that are in these first couple issues of Hellboy. To some extent, I got it right right out of the bat story-wise. It’s the way it’s drawn and colored, all that stuff has gotten radically refined.

Mike Mignola, reflecting on Hellboy: Seed of Destruction #1, released in March 1994. The 20th anniversary of that first issue will be celebrated Saturday worldwide with Hellboy Day. You can see the list of participating retailers at the link.


Quote of the Day | Why people go to comic conventions

This year's Pix poster by Jeremy Baum

This year’s Pix poster by Jeremy Baum

“People are constantly in communication and sharing with each other. But they physically want to meet each other in the flesh. There’s obviously a tactile element, but also a craft element in the production of the object, that’s lacking when you see it on the Internet. It’s the difference between seeing a Coca-Cola commercial on TV, and going to buy one.”

Bill Boichel, owner of Pittsburgh’s Copacetic Comics, talking about this weekend’s PIX: The Pittsburgh Indie Comix Expo, which is sponsored by his store and the Toonseum. Boichel’s point is particularly apt for small-press comics shows, where many of the works are handmade or have an artisanal quality that doesn’t necessarily come across on the Internet.

While PIX is drawing in a number of out-of-town guests, including Trina Robbins, Boichel notes that Pittsburgh has quite a comics scene of its own, with seven out of the 10 bestselling graphic novels in his store being local products.

Quote of the Day | ‘There’s always room for further diversity’

all-new ultimates“There’s always room for more; there’s always room for further diversity. Whether it’s more Latino characters, or more Black characters, or more LGBT characters — you pretty much can pick any group of people, and as long as you’re not talking about middle-aged white men like myself, they’re probably underrepresented in the world of superhero comics. It’s tough from a sales perspective, because all of the characters that are still the bedrock, firmament characters tend to be guys that were created in the 1960s if not earlier, at a time when comic books were predominantly, if not exclusively, white. While it’s nice that we’ve made some steps — we have more female-led books than ever before — that doesn’t mean we should stop coming up with them. Just because we have a few books that have Hispanic characters, that doesn’t mean that we shouldn’t look for more opportunities to do more there. The same thing is true with every demographic that you can speak to. No matter where you happen to sit within the cultural zeitgeist, it’s never mission accomplished. It’s always, ‘What’s next?’ There’s always going to be somebody who is underrepresented, or that you could represent more truthfully or more affectingly.”

Tom Brevoort, Marvel’s senior vice president of publishing, discussing the titles introduced as part of the “All-New Marvel NOW!” initiative

Quote of the Day | Censorship, ‘Fun Home’ and South Carolina

Fun Home“When the government, in effect, attempts to dictate what college students must, or must not, read, the state is going to suffer. Not only will its censorship impede academia from innovation and honesty, it will, as Rep. Gilda Cobb-Hunter, D-Orangeburg, said, hurt the state’s efforts to attract jobs. Who wants to live in a place where legislative budget writers determine what gets taught in college?

Voters expect their representatives to fix roads, fairly fund education and make laws for the safety of citizens, not to police people’s thoughts.”

– the editorial board of the Charleston, South Carolina, Post and Courier, responding to a vote last week by the state House Ways and Means committee to reduce funding two universities that recommended gay-themed books. One of the schools, the College of Charleston, selected Alison Bechdel’s acclaimed graphic novel Fun Home, which Rep. Garry Smith, R-Greenville, said “goes beyond the pale of academic debate. It graphically shows lesbian acts.”

Quote of the Day | Clancy Brown on comic adaptations

cowboys and aliensCowboys & Aliens was a completely manufactured myth of a comic book. They went in and sold the idea of Cowboys & Aliens based on a one-sheet of what they thought the cover of a comic book might be, then sold it as a movie, then created as a comic book. They backed in to the comic book part of it. The book itself isn’t actually very good. It’s worse than the movie.

I did another one like that — Hellbenders was an idea that J.T. Petty had, and he wrote it as a script. One of the producers got the idea to pitch it around as a comic book. As soon as something is a graphic novel or a comic book or has another life in a another medium, people sit up and take notice and are more willing to write the check.

I don’t know why that is — well, I think it’s obvious why that is: Because the traditional properties like Superman and Batman and the Marvel characters — Spider-Man and so on — they’re all money machines. So, people are trying to create that. [...] Everything is being optioned now to be turned into franchises because of the success of Walking Dead and a few that have made the transition. Mostly, people walk into a room and pitch a movie — and the first question if they don’t say it in the original pitch is, ‘Is this a graphic novel or comic?’ and of course you say, ‘Yes’.”

– actor Clancy Brown, who has a good deal of experience with comic-book adaptations, discussing Cowboys & Aliens Hollywood’s continued attraction to comics

Quote of the Day | Mike Richardson on creator-owned comics

hellboy-mignola

“I know there’s a certain appeal for creators to work on the classic characters like Batman, Superman and Spider-Man, but I’ve said this before: I asked creators who have worked on those books who the people were doing the books ten years ago, and they don’t know! But I can say, ‘Who worked on Sin City?’ and they’ll go ‘Frank Miller.’ Who worked on Hellboy? Mike Mignola. Who worked on The Goon? Eric Powell. They know it instantly. So to me, the lure of creating your own character and owning it — owning your own universe and being associated with that — in the long run for talented writers and artists makes me question why someone would toil away on a company owned character for years and years of their lives.”

– Dark Horse founder Mike Richardson, discussing his company’s commitment to publishing creator-owned work

Quote of the Day | “‘Dark Knight Returns’ was a hurricane”

dkr1a

“I do admit that I am surprised that the series has such a high profile still but, make no mistake, I’m very happy to be a part of it. I can’t speak for Frank [Miller], but neither I nor anyone else in the DC office realized the impact of the books at that time. It would have been crazy to predict way back then. It’s not unheard of to have a particular project garner a lot of attention in the moment, but it is unusual for a project to cast such a long shadow, to hold up so many years later. Dark Knight Returns was a hurricane. It was a force of nature that swept everyone up in its path, and I learned a lot from that experience. I’d love to work with Frank at least once more, whether it’s for the 30th anniversary or something else, so this is my way of starting to put the offer out there. Let’s go, Frank — it would be great fun!”

– inker Klaus Janson, reflecting on the legacy of Batman: The Dark Knight Returns, which marks its 30th anniversary in 2016

Quote of the Day | ‘Oh, always press’

prodigal“Oh, always press. Just understand the difference between useless whining and actual pressing. What corporations understand is money. They don’t give a toss about blog posts or combative questioners at conventions. Clearly.

You vote and make change by the strategic application or withdrawal of money. Buy the products you want and withhold money from those companies that don’t produce said product. And say why you’ve done so in both cases.

But this isn’t politics. It’s business. At least, we’re all pretending it’s only business.”

– actor, screenwriter, novelist and comics writer Geoffrey Thorne, when asked whether consumers should give up hope that Marvel and DC will hire “a respectable amount” of writers of color

‘They are starved for content and looking for content they can relate to’

captain marvel1

“While we don’t have any market research, the eyes don’t lie. If you go to conventions and comic book stores, more and more female readers are emerging. They are starved for content and looking for content they can relate to.”

– Marvel Editor-in-Chief Axel Alonso, discussing comics’ shifting demographics


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