Quote of the Day Archives - Page 2 of 9 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

“I basically didn’t want to be the Mike Love of ‘Iron Fist’”

immortal iron fist2“Ed [Brubaker] got too busy, so Ed had to leave. Sales were what they were — it was Iron Fist. It was critically acclaimed, and not losing money was enough. But David Aja was going to stop because of the schedule and other work, and Ed was going to stop because of his schedule, and I basically didn’t want to be the Mike Love of Iron Fist, the only original member left ruining what you remember about the band. So I said alright, we’ll stop at #16. I knew what my twist was, what my end was, I thought I’d do that sort of West Wing thing where you end with a “holy fuck!” moment for the next guys, and let them have fun building everything up and finding out what the new status quo is. So it felt more important to go out on a high note with everybody happy, than to be the guy who ruined the book.”

– writer Matt Fraction, on why he left Marvel’s The Immortal Iron Fist with Issue 16, in an interesting discussion of his career from Rex Mantooth through The Order


Quote of the Day | ‘Committing a sin against your talent’

i kill giants1“Forget the mythology. I don’t care that Hemingway was a drunk or the Beatles dropped acid or [Insert famous artist here] did [insert drug here]. If you are using drugs or alcohol as part of your creative process you are killing yourself slowly and as a friend of mine once put it, you’re ‘committing a sin against your talent.’

You can’t die of a heroin overdose if you never try heroin. You can’t kill someone in a drunk driving accident if you never pick up the first drink. You won’t throw up your guts or have liver failure or lose your mind from illegal substances if you don’t put things in your body that do not belong there.

There are other ways to sin against your talent, but drugs and alcohol are easily avoided and if you are serious about being a writer/artist/musician/creative soul. Madness is not mandatory. It is not even recommended. The romanticized idea that the drug-addled creative lives a more authentic life is 100% horseshit manufactured to justify self-destructive behavior.

You can create art while sober. You can experience mind-blowing sights and sounds with a clear head. You can access deeper meaning and glimpse the secrets of the universe just by being present.

The world will be more beautiful, more authentic, more amazing, because you will be a part of it instead of stumbling towards it.”

– writer Joe Kelly, reflecting on the death of actor Philip Seymour Hoffman and the notion that “drugs and booze were a prerequisite for a creative life”

Quote of the Day | Tom Brevoort on character ‘oversaturation’

Art by Paolo Rivera

Art by Paolo Rivera

“If you’d asked me several years ago, I likely would have spoken about some tipping point where you have too much and everything crashed. Part of that is that I grew up in a world where there was one X-MEN book, one AVENGERS book and, well, three SPIDER-MAN books (counting MARVEL TEAM-UP.) But today, I think that, while there is a tipping point potentially somewhere out there on the horizon, it’s nowhere near as close as we sometimes like to think (or fear.) What matters is the quality of the work. How many BATMAN books are there at this point, every month? How many WOLVERINE books? And still, those characters are more likely to sell better than, I don’t know, THE FLASH or STORM. The audience likes what it likes, and so long as what you produce is good, they will always be content to have more. It’s when the quality goes down that you have a problem — but you have that problem with there being only one book as well.”

Tom Brevoort, Marvel’s senior vice president of publishing, responding to a question on his Formspring about how to address character “oversaturation,” if it’s even an issue that exists

Quote of the Day | ‘Let’s steer into the curve’

bitch planet“No one gets to have their cake and eat it too. So I don’t get to talk about the problems with the lack of diversity in both the books we put out and the creators behind them, I don’t get to speak up about that and then not have my gender brought up as an issue as well. … People will often apologize when they ask me about feminist issues in the industry, and it’s tough. I don’t want them to apologize. These are things that need to be discussed. … My husband’s [comics writer Matt Fraction] gender never comes up in an interview. I think it’s a thing that, if we want it to get better, we have to talk about it. It’s on the table whether we like it or not, so let’s go ahead and – if it’s there, let’s sit down and feast.

I’ve been accused of putting forth sort of an agenda in Captain Marvel, which I actually don’t think I’m doing at all. I think I’ve been very true to what the character was created for, the roots of the character that I had nothing to do with. I was 7 years old when that character’s first book came out under Ms. Marvel. I’ve been accused of putting forth an agenda and so on and so forth. There’s a certain part of me that’s just like, ‘If I’m going to take the heat for it, well … let’s do it then. Let’s steer into the curve.’”

– writer Kelly Sue DeConnick, discussing Bitch Planet, Captain Marvel and feminism


Quote of the Day | Peter Gross on Shia LaBeouf and copyright

unwritten-apocalypse1“I think it’s very interesting that you bring up Shia because I just brought him up to Mike [Carey] the other day. I was proposing that we introduce a character based on him, because he does crystallize a lot of what we talk about. We’ve had a lot of discussion about whether copyright is a good thing or a horrible thing. What would happen if Superman was copyright-free? And people could add onto his story? Maybe we would end up with incredibly powerful stories that add a whole dimension of life to our existence because they would be able to build in a way that they can’t build otherwise. I don’t know. On the other hand, I want to get paid for what I do. [...] I think we should write to Shia and his people for permission to use him and his likeness in our story. If they said ‘No,’ it would bring up a lot of interesting issues. Wouldn’t it?”

The Unwritten co-creator Peter Gross, commenting on Shia LaBeouf, the public domain and storytelling, in an interview with Comic Book Resources

 

Quote of the Day | ‘I can’t find it in my heart to apologize’

teent titans1“I know it was a bit of heavy lifting for some of the longtime fans of the core characters on the book — and Newsarama fans haven’t been shy about voicing their complaints — but I can’t find it in my heart to apologize.

I was hired to write a series that started the team ‘on page one’ … no history, no preexisting relationships, for readers that were not familiar with the concept of Teen Titans. The new continuity being what it was, Bart could not have been Bart Allen from the future, Superboy could not have been a clone who spent the last few months living on the Kent Farm as Ma and Pa had died some 10 years ago, and on and on. … so while I wouldn’t expect anyone to agree with every choice I made or was handed, I will say I remain very proud of the book I’ve worked on for the last 30-odd issues.”

– writer Scott Lobdell‘s message to longtime Teen Titans fans as the DC Comics series heads toward its April cancellation

Quote of the Day | Burnham on playing left brain to Morrison’s right

nameless teaser“I think why we make good comics together is that he – if you believe in the right-brain/left-brain sort of thing – seems to be a really out-there, weirdo right-brain guy, and I’m very literal-minded and I believe in strict storytelling rules. I never break the 180 rule in my storytelling. I have a very literal perspective. I’ve got all sorts of instructions that I live by to tell a coherent story. And a lot of people’s problems with Grant Morrison comics is that they can get a little too confusing for them. I think that my very literal, very disciplined storytelling style can help to sell his crazy flights of fancy and make it a little more coherent – and I don’t really agree with most of the people who say it’s too confusing to follow, but I guess I can see where they’re coming from. I think it helps get the story over if it’s very clear exactly what’s happening. And then the stuff that’s happening is weird enough where you can still have that sense of unease.”

– artist Chris Burnham, on the appeal of collaborating with Grant Morrison, first on Batman Incorporated and next on their creator-owned horror comic Nameless


Quote of the Day | ‘It’s very humbling’

From ComicArtFans

From ComicArtFans

“It’s very humbling to put your best effort into something for so many years, and not really know if it’s appreciated, and then to find out that people have been paying attention and following what you’ve been doing.”

– artist Russ Heath, famed for his work on such titles as G.I. Combat and Our Army at War, reacting to the news that he’ll be honored in May with the National Cartoonists Society’s Milton Caniff Lifetime Achievement Award

Quote of the Day | Moore vs. Morrison, Round … something

alan moore“I announce From Hell and in short order he ‘has the idea’ for a comic strip account of a historical serial murderer. I announce Lost Girls, a lengthy erotic work involving characters from fiction, and within a few months he has somehow managed to conceptualise a Vertigo mini-series along exactly those lines. What I at first believed to be the actions of an ordinary comic-business career plagiarist came to take on worrying aspects of cargo cultism, as if this funny little man believed that by simply duplicating all of my actions, whether he understood them or not, he could somehow become me and duplicate my success. It would appear that at one stage, as an example, he had concluded that the secret to being a big-time acclaimed comic-writer was to be found in having a memorable hairstyle. Perhaps unsurprisingly, the possession of talent, hard-earned craft or even his own ideas would seem never to have occurred to him.”

Alan Moore, delving deep into his history with Grant Morrison (such that it is), whom he refers to as “some feverishly fixated non-entity” and “my own personal 18th century medicinal leech,” who “through the early years of this present century [...] somehow managed to perpetuate his career seemingly without the accomplishment of any major or memorable works.”

The interview, conducted via email by Padraig O’Mealoid, is a fascinating and contentious read, with Moore also taking aim at journalist Laura Sneddon and The Independent. But he devotes a lot of space to Morrison.

Quote of the Day | Marvel comics, movies and editorial direction

captain america25“I’m just jumping on this one because I find it ludicrous. First of all, that’s what we should be doing. In order to help the print business we need to get as many people as possible excited about the content we’re delivering them, and the less confusing it is for them to engage in our product, the more success we’re going to have. That’s one part. We should be communicating with each other. [...] At the same, we allowed Ed Brubaker to kill Captain America and have another guy run around in that costume for over 18 months to two years when we were making a Captain America movie. We stopped making Thor the comic book for over a year and then we re-launched it with JMS and Oliver Coipel telling his story. Does Marvel give editorial direction on what you can and cannot do with our characters? Yes. We did that before we made movies and before we went to Disney. That’s what the editorial group does here for a living.”

– Marvel Publisher Dan Buckley, responding to the suggestion that companies like his “with a big media operation” are “controlling the print content to a greater degree in order to make it align more successfully with the other media”

Quote of the Day | The Great Asterix-Tintin War of 2014

asterix and the picts

“Perhaps it’s simply the appeal of the underdog. Asterix is clearly for children, and for losers: it depicts a world where ungovernable appetites are momentarily sated and fulfilled. Growing up, one knew instinctively that Tintin and his adventures represented a world of adult meanings and responsibilities, unattainable sophistication and privilege. The Tintin books were for the sort of people who went to actual France on actual holidays; the sort of people who might read the books in the original French. Asterix, with its absurd levels of comic-book violence – all those swirling stars and sticking-out tongues, black eyes and bumps to the head – was for anybody and everybody. It was the sort of thing you actually wanted to read. One could imagine a Tintin book as a gift from a benevolent godfather but you discovered Asterix for yourself, well-thumbed and plastic-covered, in the grubby wooden dump-bins of the local library.”

– author Ian Sansom, arguing “why Asterix is better than Tintin” in the New Statesman (if your Twitter feed blew up this morning with U.K. folks drawing lines in the sand, this is why)

Quote of the Day | Super-fan Jerry Seinfeld on ‘Man of Steel’

seinfeld-superman

“I was so happy that they made another Superman movie! I’m really reluctant to be critical of it in any way. But I thought the glossing over of the figuring out a secret identity and why he felt he needed one was a huge missed opportunity for that character, and one of the most interesting things about Superman is the whole secret identity. So to me it was too much action/violence and not enough character study.”

– comedian, and famously die-hard Superman fan, Jerry Seinfeld, addressing director Zack Snyder’s divisive Man of Steel in a Reddit AMA

(via Badass Digest)

‘If you do different things, you attract different readers. It’s that simple’

saga“I think a big reason our industry is experiencing so much growth right now is because we’re finally doing the kind of comics that resonate with a diverse readership. It’s kind of like what happened a decade or so back when comics first started gaining acceptance in bookstores and getting written up in the mainstream press, really, because it’s a slow process and there’s no one way to reach everyone. I mean, for a very long time, comic books and superheroes were practically synonymous, and it took a lot of unique work by a lot of different men and women to finally open things up to the point where someone other than the standard comics reader see the full potential of our medium. If you do different things, you attract different readers. It’s that simple.”

– Image Comics Publisher Eric Stephenson, addressing the importance of a diverse readership in an interview with Comic Book Resources

Quote of the Day | Sage Stossel on female superheroes

004_starling“It surprised me that outdated norms like those could still persist — especially in the cartooning world, since I think of cartoonists (at least the ones I know!) as exceptionally nice, sensitive people. I suspect there may be big-picture reasons for it — entrenched theories about what the comic book fan market is looking for, or maybe mainstream publishing houses still dominated by people or attitudes from an older era. But it’s hard to imagine that a concerted effort to make the comics world’s female characters more substantive and realistic wouldn’t pay off for male and female readers alike, making for richer, more interesting stories, and ultimately benefiting publishers’ bottom lines.”

Sage Stossel, talking with Hero Complex about her new graphic novel Starling.

Stossel wrote the story because she was interested in the double-life aspect of being a superhero; her lead character is a working woman who has to deal with real-life problems in addition to fighting crime. After the first draft was done, Stossel, who was not a regular superhero comics reader, started researching other comics to see how her story would fit into the market. “It was at that point that I became keenly aware both of how two-dimensionally, and often demeaningly, women are depicted in many mainstream comics, and also of growing efforts on the part of some fans and creators to reverse those tendencies,” she said. In the graphic novel, Starling chooses a practical uniform, dismissing the other choices with “Who’s your costume designer? A 13-year-old boy?”

‘He did not set out to … do a comic strip that will last 100 years’

charles schulz2“I think it’s amazing that all of those things have become part of our culture. He did not set out to write the great American novel, or to do a comic strip that will last 100 years … I think when people asked him, ‘did you ever think your characters would become part of the culture’ it puzzled him a bit and he didn’t have a very good answer for it … I think his answer was something like, ‘I just tried to put everything I had into the comic strip and do the best I could every day.’”

Jean Schulz, widow of Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz, on the “classic” status of the comic strips. In an online chat, she also confirmed that her husband could be as “bitter” as you’ve heard. “Yes, he could be cranky particularly if he had person after person after person interrupting him from things … But he was overall a pleasant person.”


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