Talking Comics With Tim Archives - Page 2 of 6 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Talking Comics with Tim | Alison Sampson on ‘Genesis’

Genesis

Typically a newcomer artist to comics doesn’t have a background of 25 years of experience in architecture, but United Kingdom-based Alison Sampson is not your typical creator. One realizes that after seeing her one-of-a-kind work on Genesis, her upcoming Image Comics graphic novella with writer Nathan Edmondson about a man who gains unlimited power, only for it to become his worst nightmare.

Naturally, I was curious to learn how an architect decided to explore working in comics; we discuss that among other topics in this interview.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Matthew Petz on ‘War of the Woods’

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Comics are a visual medium, and some images grab your attention at the outset. In the case of writer/artist Matthew Petz‘s War of the Woods, I liked the story from the moment I saw a live turtle being used as the otter Phin’s helmet.

The digital series, which reveals an alien invasion of Earth from the perspective of an animal kingdom, has completed two seasons (both Season 1 and Season 2 are available on comiXology) with more on the horizon. Petz recently took some time to discuss how the series came into being and some of his plans for Season 3.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Toni Fejzula on ‘Veil’


Veil-toni

It’s a cause for celebration any time Greg Rucka launches a new series, as he does Wednesday with Veil, the story of a girl who awakens with amnesia in an abandoned subway station. Teaming with Rucka on this new Dark Horse ongoing is artist Toni Fejzula. I challenge you not to read Veil once you see the eyes of the lead character as drawn by Fejzula — that and so much more about his art instantly caught my attention to the series. With this interview, I aimed to gain insight into Fejzula’s passion and approach for this new collaborative project. It’s an added bonus to learn he might be listening to Rock Lobster while drawing Veil

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Talking Comics with Tim | Jimmy Palmiotti on ‘Denver’

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The always-busy writing team of Jimmy Palmiotti and Justin Gray are back with a Kickstarter campaign for Denver, a 72-page original graphic novel for mature readers illustrated by Pier Brito. As with most things involving Palmiotti, there is an interesting angle to this particular project (his sixth Kickstarter) in that the creators have added a soundtrack to the story, written and composed by Hans Karl. Denver comes equipped with a direct story pitch: “… one man going against all odds to get back the woman he loves, all set in the not-too-distant future.” With 15 days left on the campaign, Palmiotti was happy to discuss this latest Kickstarter.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Jimmie Robinson on ‘Five Weapons’

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Writer/artist Jimmie Robinson has been creating and publishing his stories through Image Comics for almost 20 years. Let that just soak in for a moment. Wednesday marks the resumption of Five Weapons, his now-ongoing series set in a high school for assassins, which launched as a five-issue miniseries, but it performed so well that Jim Valentino’s Image imprint Shadowline offered to make it a monthly.

In addition to discussing the transition from miniseries to ongoing with this week’s Issue 6, Robinson agreed to discuss the recent Image Expo and his larger industry realization that the loss of Dwayne McDuffie left a hole that has yet to be filled. He also addresses his intentions to return to the Bomb Queen universe as well as whether he would ever write for Marvel (in particular Rocket Racer) or DC (think Chase).

As part of the Five Weapons coverage, Robinson shared several upcoming covers, plus one in-process page from Five Weapons #7. Be sure to answer the question that Robinson poses at the end of this interview in the comments section.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Brendan McCarthy on ‘The Deleted’

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It shouldn’t be a surprise that, on the heels of September’s successful release of The Best of Milligan & McCarthy, there might be new work from Brendan McCarthy published by Dark Horse: On Wednesday, the four-part story The Deleted begins in Dark Horse Presents #32, dealing with the possibility of uploading the consciousness into a virtual world.

It’s rare that I interview a creator who can provide answers that open with the phrase, “Myself and Brett Ewins, Bryan Talbot and Alan Moore were the first people to start off the new era of comics in the U.K.,” so while I had the chance, we discussed more than his new story, thanks to McCarthy’s willingness to give his time (and samples of his myriad works, past and present).

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Talking Comics with Tim | Aaron Kuder on ‘Action Comics’

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Action Comics is quickly becoming a fan favorite since the creative team of writer Greg Pak and artist Aaron Kuder boarded the series. With the release last week of Action Comics #27, it seemed like a good time to interview Kuder and get him to explain how his experience as a budding electrician had an influence on Lana Lang’s current career choice of electrical engineering.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Jane Irwin on Her Successful ‘Clockwork Game’ Kickstarter

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Last year writer/artist Jane Irwin executed a successful Kickstarter for Clockwork Game: The Illustrious Career of a Chess-Playing Automaton, a historical fiction graphic novel. I was curious to learn about her experience in getting the project successfully funded, and she was kind enough to answer my questions in this brief interview.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Matteo Buffagni on ‘Avengers Assemble’

Some color samples  that Matteo Buffagni provided while discussing his design of Toxie Doxie's costume

Some color samples that Matteo Buffagni provided while discussing his design of Toxie Doxie’s costume

Wednesday sees artist Matteo Buffagni teaming with co-writers Kelly Sue DeConnick and Warren Ellis on Avengers Assemble #22, a tie-in to Marvel’s “Inhumanity” event. In addition to chatting about that, Buffagni was kind enough to share a glimpse into his design process for June Covington/Toxie Doxie’s new costume, revealed at the end of Avengers Assemble #21.

Tim O’Shea: For those unfamiliar with your career, how long have been working in comics?

Matteo Buffagni: I’ve been working at Marvel since 2010, when I started on X-23 then jumped on Daken, Ultimate Iron Man: The Demon in the Armor, Astonishing X-Men and now Avengers Assemble.

Before those assignments I attended the International School of Comics in Florence and worked on a couple of French books called Vestiges.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Lee Garbett on ‘Loki: Agent of Asgard’

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As part of All-New Marvel NOW!, veteran artist Lee Garbett will team in February with writer Al Ewing for Loki: Agent of Asgard, a series the god of mischief is fully grown and in the service of the All-Mother. More immediately, however, Marvel is setting the stage for the initiative with All-New Marvel NOW! Point One #1, a one-shot that arrives Jan. 8 with a Garbett-drawn Loki serving as the thread that brings together all of the stories.

In my interview with Garbett, the artist clearly relishes the opportunity to draw Asgard’s new “one-man secret service” as well as work with Ewing. ROBOT 6 is also pleased to provide an exclusive page from the upcoming All-New Marvel NOW Point One.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Glen Berger on ‘Song of Spider-Man’

Song of Spider-Man

Song of Spider-Man

Few have a better perspective on the making of the Broadway musical Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark than playwright Glen Berger. He spent six years co-writing the script and has now penned a tell-all memoir about the tumultuous experience, Song of Spider-Man: The Inside Story of the Most Controversial Musical in Broadway History.

As noted on the book’s back cover, one scene — in which “Green Goblin pushes a Steinway off a skyscraper only to be sent to his own death because he didn’t realize he was attached to the piano by Spider-Man’s webbing” — earned him the job, but it also would ultimately lead to the dismissal of director and co-writer Julie Taymor.

We cover a great deal of ground in this interview, including a brief discussion of (as he mentions in the book) his reaction to sharing a co-writer credit for the play with Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, who worked on the project for just two months. It was interesting to get Berger’s perspective, particularly when comparing what it’s like to develop for theater as opposed to television. I’m also curious to see what musical he’s developing for Warner Bros.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Steve Lieber on Travel Portland TV ad

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Earlier this month ROBOT 6 noted that Portland, Oregon-based artist Steve Lieber appeared in a Travel Portland ad piece to promote tax-free shopping in the city. Seeing the piece made me want to know more about how Lieber became involved and what was the experience was like. Fortunately, Lieber, who’s now working on The Superior Foes of Spider-Man, was able to answer my questions in a brief interview.

Tim O’Shea: How did you get tapped to do the commercial? Did you have to submit art samples before getting cast?

Steve Lieber: The agency was familiar with my work before contacting me. It was simultaneously flattering and surprising.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Christy Blanch on Retailing, Education & ‘Charlie Wormwood’

The Damnation of Charlie Wormwood

The Damnation of Charlie Wormwood

You may know Christy Blanch from her recent investment, along with her partner Mark Waid, in Alter Ego Comics in Muncie, Indiana, her comics education work, or her collaboration with Chris Carr, Chee and Troy Peteri on the Thrillbent series The Damnation of Charlie Wormwood.

While the comic about a college professor in a dangerous partnership for the sake of his family is on hiatus, that’s about to end. Blanch and I discussed all three aspects of her busy career in this interview.

Tim O’Shea: Judging from the store’s Facebook page, it’s pursuing a great deal of community outreach. Are you seeing new faces shopping in the store as a result?

Christy Blanch: Mark, Jason [Pierce, the initial owner] and I are all about creating community. We want to give people a reason to come here to shop. We want them to feel like this is their clubhouse to come in and hang out, talk comics, and just be themselves. We are seeing lots of new faces. The old location was a nice store, but we really were hidden. Downtown we are very visible and we see new people every day which is a great feeling. I love it when I sell someone their first comic book especially if it is a series that I love. I always tell them I envy them because I would love to ‘forget’ the book and be able to read it for the first time again.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Victor Santos on ‘Polar: Came from the Cold’

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Long before we worked together, I respected Kevin Melrose’s instincts on picking creators to watch. So when he advised the Robot 6 audience to read Victor Santos‘ webcomic Polar, I was intrigued. That interest only grew when Jim Gibbons (one of the best editors working in comics) told me Dark Horse was collecting Polar’s first season in Polar: Came from the Cold (which ROBOT 6 previewed in late September); I knew I wanted to interview the Bilbao, Spain-based artist.

In addition to discussing the 160-page Polar hardcover, set for release on Dec. 11, we also touched upon the upcoming Furious, a Dark Horse miniseries with his Mice Templar collaborator Bryan J.L. Glass, set to launch on Jan. 29. (For additional Furious information, please read Albert Ching’s September interview with Glass.)

Tim O’Shea: You are very clear at your website in terms of the influences that inform Polar: Came from the Cold. “The story uses a minimalistic and direct style inspired by movies like Le Samurai (Jean-Pierre Melville, 1967), Tokyo Drifter (Seijun Suzuki, 1965) or Point Blank (John Boorman, 1967) and novels like The Killer Inside Me (Jim Thompson, 1952) or The Eiger Sanction (Trevanian, 1979). Polar is also a tribute to artists like Jim Steranko, Jose Muñoz, Alberto Breccia, Alex Toth and Frank Miller.” I would love to discuss each and every element of those sentences, but I will just focus on two elements. How did you first find out about films like Le Samurai? When did you read your first Steranko story, and what was it?

Victor Santos: The first Steranko book I read was the Outland adaptation. I was studying fine arts, and I hadn’t really had a great deal of exposure to U.S. comics. I’d read a lot of superheroes books in my childhood, but the manga explosion of the ’80 and ’90s caught me just in my teenage years. Actually, it was during my university years when I discovered the great U.S. artists like Eisner, Ditko, Crumb, Toth, Caniff and dozens more (thanks to friends I met there, never the professors). I discovered an old Spanish edition of Outland in a street market. Wow, that stuff blew me away! The big panels contrasting the little panels, as well as that “heavy black lighting” … This edition was a big, European album size, so the double-page spreads are gigantic. I began to research. These were very intense years for me; I was absorbing all the American history of comics at the same time.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Natalie Nourigat on ‘A Boy & a Girl’

A Boy & A Girl

A Boy & A Girl

Dec. 11 will see the release of the latest collaboration between artist Natalie Nourigat and writer Jamie S. Rich, A Boy & a Girl, a 160-page sci-fi romance. Published by Oni Press (Diamond Order CodeJUL131213), the graphic novel is a futuristic story that considers an Earth where life-like androids are becoming just as common as real humans, and where a guy named Travis decides he just has to get a date with a girl named Charley. That spark of interest leads to a whole slew of quirky turns and revelations. I recently caught up with Nourigat, who’s normally based out of Portland, Oregon’s Periscope Studio but is spending a year in France, to discuss her latest work. To get a slice of the story, be sure to check out Oni’s 10-page preview.

Tim O’Shea: Was there any specific element in particular about Jamie S. Rich’s script that persuaded you to want to draw the story?

Natalie Nourigat: I wanted to draw the story before I even knew what the story was, because I wanted to work with Jamie again. He was really open to collaboration, and from the beginning he invited me to suggest elements that interested me to steer us into something that would be fun for both of us. I wanted a time-travel story, and then a futuristic sci-fi setting, and then the split-perspective angle as things progressed.

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