Alison Sampson Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Winners announced for 2014 British Comic Awards

BCA LogoThe winners of the third annual British Comic Awards were announced Saturday at the Thought Bubble Festival in Leeds, England. Two of the four awards went to titles published by Image Comics; all four of the winning works are readily available in the United States. Here are the winners:

Best Comic: The Wicked + The Divine #1 by Kieron Gillen, Jamie McKelvie, Matt Wilson and Clayton Cowles (Image Comics)

Best Book: The Encyclopedia of Early Earth by Isabel Greenberg (Jonathan Cape)

Young People’s Comic Award: Hilda and the Black Hound by Luke Pearson (Flying Eye Books)

Emerging Talent: Alison Sampson for her artwork on Genesis (Image Comics) and “Shadows” from the In The Dark anthology (IDW Publishing)

Hall of Fame: Posy Simmonds

Two years ago, when the first awards were announced, there was some discussion about the gender balance of both the committee that chose the books and the nominations themselves. Last year’s awards all went to men. This year, there were more women on the committee and more women on the shortlist, and the awards were split, with Simmonds giving the women the edge.

Talking Comics with Tim | Alison Sampson on ‘Genesis’

Genesis

Typically a newcomer artist to comics doesn’t have a background of 25 years of experience in architecture, but United Kingdom-based Alison Sampson is not your typical creator. One realizes that after seeing her one-of-a-kind work on Genesis, her upcoming Image Comics graphic novella with writer Nathan Edmondson about a man who gains unlimited power, only for it to become his worst nightmare.

Naturally, I was curious to learn how an architect decided to explore working in comics; we discuss that among other topics in this interview.

Continue Reading »

‘Think of a City’ celebrates world-building power of comics

kirby header

Alison Sampson describes the art project “Think of a City” as an “exquisite corpse,” the name of the parlor game played by the surrealists in the cafes of Paris during the 1920s and ’30s. The game involved a piece of folded paper onto which, in turn, each member of a group drew a part of a body, without being able to see what others have drawn. The result was a body or character of composite parts, often quite Frankenstein-looking.

Sampson’s day job is as an architect, and like many in that profession she seems very idealistic about how good design can improve the quality of life.  Having followed her blogging over the years, it appears to me she brings that philosophy to everything she does, that she actively believes comic art has the same transformative power to affect us positively. Here’s the project’s mission statement:

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives