Alternative Comics Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Talking Comics with Tim | Sam Henderson on ‘Magic Whistle’

MW-banner

In early August, in the wake of Mike Dawson’s conversation-starting essay, Magic Whistle creator Sam Henderson assessed the mitigating factors affecting his work as a cartoonist, laid many of the challenges at his own feet. As refreshing as it was to read a candid assessment of his creative plight, I was curious to learn Henderson’s mindset after people he responded to his post. While I was at it, of course, I angled to get a glimpse of his creative process.

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Alternative Comics announces full spring/summer lineup

Unspoken

Unspoken

The recently resurrected Alternative Comics has announced its full list of comics for the spring and summer of this year. They include:

  • The Big Feminist BUT, edited by Joan Reilly and Shannon O’Leary. An anthology featuring work by folks like Lauren Weinstein, Jeffrey Brown, Sarah Oleksyk, Gabrielle Bell, Justin Hall, Ron Rege Jr. and Vanessa Davis. (March)
  • Sunbeam on the Astronaut, by Steven Cerio. A collection of Cerio’s psychedelic comics, art work and illustrations. (April; you can see a preview of the book here)
  • (Mostly) Wordless, by Jed Alexander. An all-ages collection of short stories, told using as few words as possible (hence the title). (April)
  • Ritual 3: Vile Decay, by Malachi Ward. A sci-fi story involving an old woman relating to her grandson how exactly everything went horribly wrong. (June)
  • Magic Whistle #14, by Sam Henderson. Henderson returns to his long-running, one-man humor anthology. (June)
  • Sugar Booger #2-3, by Kevin Scalzo. Scalzo’s dayglo all-ages series continues. For more on this comic, see my interview with Scalzo. (March and July)
  • Unspoken, by Megan Kelso. A newly “remastered” version of Kelso’s 1990s-era zine collecting various short strips that haven’t been collected elsewhere. (August)

In addition, the company also plans to offer digital releases of Megan Kelso’s seminal Girlhero series (all six issues); Backwards Folding Mirror by Forming author Jesse Moynihan (three issues); Cat Suit by Steve Lafler; Subway Series and Queen’s Day by Leela Corman; The Vagabonds by Josh Neufield; and More Mundane by Noah Van Sciver.

You can read the full press release below.

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Wow Cool and Alternative Comics open California store

wow cool-alternative

Wow Cool‘s Marc Arsenault, who in 2012 purchased Alternative Comics, has opened an indie comics store in Cupertino, California.

Called the Wow Cool | Alternative Comics Bookstore and Newsstand, the shop specializes in small-press and self-published comics, graphic novels, ‘zines and art books. It also carries vinyl and CDs from local music labels, as well magazines like Juxtapoz, Wax Poetics and Lucky Peach.

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Kevin Scalzo talks candy, kids and ‘Sugar Booger’

Sugar Booger #1

Sugar Booger #1

There’s been a wealth of children comics available recently, but I feel pretty safe in saying there hasn’t been anything quite like Kevin Scalzo‘s Sugar Booger. At least, I haven’t seen any comics involving a large, boisterous, bright blue bear with the uncanny ability to make delicious candy spew forth from his nose.

Although he’s been a part of the alternative comics scene for several decades now, Scalzo is jumping into serialized waters with the release of the first issue of this ongoing series (two more issues are planned for 2014) from Alternative Comics.

Combining a DayGlo pop sensibility with some Margaret Keane-like eyeballs, a dash of (PG-rated) underground grotesquery, and a dollop of Casper the Friendly Ghost for good measure, Sugar Booger is a rather tart confection that, while perhaps not for all tastes, will be appreciated by those who like a salty edge to their confectioneries.

I talked to Scalzo over email about the new comic, writing for kids, and his plans for the series.

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Alternative Comics to publish Cerio’s ‘Sunbeam on the Astronaut’

Sunbeam on the Astronaut

Sunbeam on the Astronaut

Alternative Comics has announced it will release Sunbeam on the Astronaut by Steven Cerio in April. The 56-page book collects new and previously unpublished material by by the artist, whose hallucinatory images have graced numerous anthologies (Last Gasp Comics and Stories, Hotwire), as well as album covers and posters for such performers as The Residents and Ministry, not to mention his own books, Pie and Steven Cerio’s ABC Book: A Drug Primer.

Sunbeam on the Astronaut will include stills from his recent film The Magnificent Pigtail Shadow, and stories involving characters from some of the film projects he did with The Residents, as well as paintings, collages and more. The book will also be available on Apple’s iBooks with a full soundtrack and narration.

For more information on Cerio, check out his website, store at Wow Cool or Vimeo page. Read the official announcement, and a five-page preview, below.

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Reviews | ‘Failure,’ ‘Primates,’ Shakespeare’s ‘Star Wars’ & more

failureFailure (Alternative Comics): Faithful readers of ROBOT 6 may recall the name of cartoonist Karl Stevens from a fall 2012 story about his Boston Phoenix strip Failure being canceled after an installment referred to Bud Light — one of the paper’s advertisers — as “diluted horse piss.” The Phoenix denied this at the time, and, coincidentally, several months later ceased publication all together (after a brief time in which it was split into five different newspapers with five different editors — Cyclops, Emma Frost, Namor, Colossus and Magik — until Cyclops assumed control over all five papers and it took the combined might of all of the Avengers to stop him … there’s a comic book joke for you!).

While that history may not be particularly relevant to readers, Stevens covers his side of the incident in his introduction to the Failure collection, which packages the final installments of his strip — right up to, and a few past, the “horse piss” one — into 150 pages of gorgeously drawn material.

What is important is that this is some great work, of the must-read variety. Failure, at this point in its existence, had become a sort of slice-of-life strip, with one to four panels devoted to anecdotes from his own life, including his relationship with his girlfriend, funny things his friends said or funny things he overheard. There are, additionally, plenty of flights of fancy starring his descendant in the far-flung future, and recurring characters like Bongbot, a time-traveling robot bong, and Pope Cat, a cat who is also the pope (if I’ve got that right).

What keeps Failure from being as mundane as you might imagine it, based on how I just described its premise, is what an incredible artist Stevens is. He works in a lush, highly detailed, representational style, as if he were drawing portraits rather than cartoons. Check this out:

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Alternative Comics catalog debuts on comiXology

Alternative Comics banner

When comics entrepreneur Marc Arsenault announced almost a year ago that he had bought defunct Alternative Comics in order to relaunch the publisher, a lot of fans (me included) were thrilled. Under founder Jeff Mason, Alternative introduced readers to creators like Graham Annable, Brandon Graham, James Kochalka, Ed Brubaker, Scott Campbell (of Great Movie Showdowns fame), Dean Haspiel and Josh Neufeld. So with Alternative and comiXology announcing today that the publisher’s catalog is becoming available digitally on the app, I was eager to talk to Arsenault about their plans.

Michael May: For those who don’t know you, what’s your background in comics?

Marc Arsenault: Wow. Where to begin? I’ve been a pretty behind-the-scenes guy for most of my time in comics, but this year I’ve hit the quarter century mark for working in them.

I figured out that I wanted to make comics somewhere around eighth grade when I discovered RAW, Warrior and Heavy Metal. When I found out about the comics program at the School of Visual Arts (SVA) my path was clear. I didn’t even apply to any other schools. I got to study with Harvey Kurtzman, Will Eisner, Joe Orlando, David Sandlin, Jerry Moriarity, Marshall Arisman and the very influential Jack Potter.

That experience was very relevant to Alternative Comics’ past and present because it was there that I met Sam Henderson and Tom Hart. I shared a studio space with Tom, and he and Sam had started an off-campus comics anthology called Tuna Casserole. By the fifth issue I became co-editor and we founded the first incarnation of my company Wow Cool. I ended up becoming an illustrator instead of a cartoonist, and did that freelance on and off up until about a decade ago.

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Six by 6 | Six great but forgotten comics anthologies

Zero Zero #2

Everyone knows about Zap, Arcade, Raw, Weirdo, Mome, Paper Rad and Kramer’s Ergot. Even lesser lights like Taboo, Twisted Sisters, the SPX anthology and even (gulp) Heavy Metal have all gotten their due at one time or another. But then there are those anthologies that, for whatever reason, never seem to resonate with readers despite containing a host of high quality contributions. Below the jump are six anthologies I don’t think have fully gotten their due. Be sure to let me know what your picks are in the comments section.

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Check out these cool Risograph zines from Japan (and one from U.S.)

Ryan Sands recently revived his alt-comics blog Same Hat, and he has a nice post up at the moment of self-published zines that use the two-color Risograph process.

Risograph is a digital printing technology that allows artists to get similar results to offset printing at a much lower price, and by using interchangeable drums, they can print more than one color. This is a very different look from standard four-color printing, though, as the colors stand on their own rather than combining to form a number of other colors; in work like this, the initial color choices really define the look. Sands, who also publishes the Electric Ant zine, has his own Risograph printing business.

If you like these, the Same Hat page has a list of links to the artists’ sites as well as to the website of Dosei magazine (all in Japanese), where these pages were published.

And for an American example, check out Hannah K. Lee’s Shoes Over Bills, which is printed by Sands.

Comics A.M. | DiDio and Lee on state of DC and industry

Jim Lee

Publishing | ICv2 sits down for a three-part interview with DC Comics Co-Publishers Jim Lee and Dan DiDio that takes the long view of the past year, covering the launch of the New 52, the effect of digital and the loss of Borders, and the recent discussions around creators’ rights. “It’s a cyclical thing. It’s an issue that constantly comes back,” DiDio said. “We hear about the great jobs and the great books that creators might participate in, but what we don’t hear about are all the books we’ve invested in over the years that never delivered, where we’ve invested in the talent and the time to make sure they had the opportunity to tell the stories they tell. It’s a very big picture, and it’s a very complex issue that can’t be boiled down. One thing I feel the most strongly is that I feel extraordinarily confident that we do everything we can to make this a very creator friendly company, to make sure they have an opportunity to tell the stories they want to tell with our characters and also in their creator owned stories too.” [ICv2]

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Comics College | Gabrielle Bell

Cecil and Jordan in New York

Comics College is a monthly feature where we provide an introductory guide to some of the comics medium’s most important auteurs and offer our best educated suggestions on how to become familiar with their body of work.

This month we’re taking a look at one of the most significant cartoonists to come out of the indie scene of the 1990s, Gabrielle Bell.

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