Art Adams Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Art Adams covers Legendary’s ‘Godzilla: Awakening’

godzilla-awakening-wide

Legendary Entertainment has released the official cover for its Godzilla graphic novel tie-in, Godzilla: Awakening, by fan-favorite artist Art Adams. His take on the King of Monsters is, of course, highly detailed, with particular attention paid to the texture of the skin and scales.

Co-written by Godzilla screenwriters Max Borenstein and Greg Borenstein, Awakening features the work of a number of artists, including Eric Battle, Yvel Guichet, Alan Quah and Lee Loughridge. Arriving May 7, the original graphic novel serves as a prequel to director Gareth Edwards’ film, although no concrete plot points have been revealed. Check out Adams’ cover and the Godzilla: Awakening synopsis below.

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Legendary announces ‘Godzilla: Awakening’ movie tie-in graphic novel

godzilla-poster

Audiences won’t get the full glimpse of director Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla until May 16, but Legendary Entertainment has announced that the King of Monsters will return slightly earlier in the Godzilla: Awakening original graphic novel set for release on May 7.

Set decades before the film, Godzilla: Awakening is co-written by Greg Borenstein and Godzilla screenwriter Max Borenstein and illustrated by Eric Battle, Yvel Guichet, Alan Quah and Lee Loughridge, with a cover by Art Adams.

“As we know, Godzilla is not just limited to films,” director Gareth Edwards said in the graphic novel’s announcement video (below). “There have been some cool comic books and manga over the years, and so I’m very excited to announce the official Godzilla graphic novel from Legendary Comics, which will pave the way for the film in May.”

Clocking in at 72 pages, Godzilla: Awakening hits stores May 7 from Legendary Comics.

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Comics artists love Frankenstein’s Bride

Arthur Adams

Saturday was the birthday of actress Elsa Lanchester, so to celebrate, John Rozum posted an amazing gallery of art inspired by her most famous role, the Bride of Frankenstein. A ton of comics artists are included and you can see many of them below the break. Be sure to visit Rozum’s site for even more, including additional pieces by Mike Mignola, Kevin Nowlan and Bruce Timm, as well as art by Basil Gogos, William Stout, and Mike McKone. Continue Reading »

Robert Goodin’s Covered blog ends on a high

Steve Rude covers Jack Kirby & Sol Brodsky's Fantastic Four #4

You’d probably already heard that Robert Goodin’s excellent and influential blog Covered was in the business of winding down, but the final curtain has now come down. Since announcing on Sept. 16 that he was intending to end the blog, Goodin has run four entries by Steve Rude, and a couple by Art Adams. Now that’s how to go out in style.

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Previews: What Looks Good for November

The Dark Crystal: Creation Myths

It’s time once again for our monthly trip through Previews looking for cool, new comics. As usual, we’re focusing on graphic novels, collected volumes, and first issues so that I don’t have to come up with a new way to say, “ Dark Horse Presents is still awesome!” every month. And I’ll continue letting Tom and Carla do the heavy lifting in regards to DC and Marvel’s solicitations.

Also, please feel free to play along in the comments. Tell me what I missed that you’re looking forward to or – if you’re a comics creator – mention your own stuff.

Ape

Puss in Boots Movie Prequel – I don’t care for movie prequel comics as a rule, but swashbuckling cats are awesome in any incarnation. As long as these are fresh gags and not just ones warmed up from Shrek, I expect to enjoy this.

Archaia

Jim Henson’s The Dark Crystal: Creation Myths, Book 1 - I just introduced my son to The Dark Crystal and Labyrinth a couple of weeks ago, so this is great timing. He had the same questions about The Dark Crystal‘s world that I always do, so I’m looking forward to seeing Archaia’s take on answering those. Totally feel like the world’s in good hands with this publisher and these creators.

The Sigh - If Archaia’s snagging Marjane Satrapi’s (Persepolis, Chicken With Plums) new book has been reported already, I missed it. I’m surprised that wasn’t bigger news.

Siegfried, Volume 1 – I’ve been meaning to read P Craig Russell’s Ring of the Nibelung adaptation for years, so I think this might be what pushes me to finally do it. It would be fun to read Russell’s and compare it to this version by Alex Alice.

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Talking Comics with Tim | Laura Allred

Laura Allred's studio

There’s a list of creators that in my estimation are not interviewed nearly enough, one such example is colorist Laura Allred. You can find several interviews with both Mike and Laura Allred together, but few rarely focus on Laura solely. So I recently crossed my fingers and shot off an email to Laura seeking to do an email interview. Much to my sheer delight, she was game for a discussion of her career as a colorist. Jamie S. Rich, long-time Allred associate and friend of Robot 6, was kind enough to share his perspective on Laura’s body of work, which helped me shape some of the topics covered in this exchange. Obviously, a huge thank you to Laura for giving so selflessly of her time. As someone who enjoyed Art Adams’ Monkeyman and O’Brien years ago, I plan to dig up my box with those issues, just to appreciate Laura’s work on it, given how highly she speaks of it in this interview.

Tim O’Shea: The life of a freelancer is never easy–and in your house, it’s extra challenging as both of you make a living either through one of the independent publishers or work through DC or Marvel. Granted at this point in your career, there is a certain brand and reputation that your work carries, still freelancing is a challenge even for successful folks as yourself. If you don’t mind me asking, how much has your faith served to buoy your spirits when the hardships of freelancing blindside you?

Laura Allred: It seems when we simply try to do our best in all our efforts, everything always seems to work out. We work hard, though Michael refuses to call it working, but we also try to make time for family and friends. So, I’ve found that my secret weapon for hardships is to just crack the whip and we get back on track. I’m only half kidding.

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Have to believe we are Magik: Art Adams’ variant cover to New Mutants #15

NEWMUTANTS_15_Var_small

It’s just not a big X-event without Art Adams, who provides the variant cover to New Mutants #15. That issue kicks off the “Fall of the New Mutants” storyline by Zeb Wells and Leonard Kirk. Here’s how Marvel describes the issue:

The game-changing Fall of the New Mutants begins as Zeb Wells and Leonard Kirk set the fractured New Mutants on a crash course with destiny! A secret military group with a deadly connection to one of the X-Men’s past has Illyana Rasputin in their sights and has no qualms about killing whoever gets in their way. They’re no strangers to severe misfortune, but could this be the end of the New Mutants?

Check out the complete cover after the jump.

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IDW returns to Jurassic Park, with covers by Miller, Pope, Adams and more

Jurassic Park #1

Jurassic Park #1, by Frank Miller

Two months after Frank Miller tweeted “I just drew a really cool dinosaur,” everything finally falls into place with IDW Publishing’s announcement of Jurassic Park: Redemption, a new ongoing series by IDW Senior Editor Bob Schreck and artist Nate Van Dyke.

June’s Issue 1 will feature covers by Frank Miller and Tom Yeates, with subsequent covers in the initial five-issue arc by Yeates with variants by Arthur Adams (#2), Paul Pope (#3), Bernie Wrightson (#4) and Bill Stout (#5). What’s more, IDW will be giving away posters at WonderCon featuring Miller’s cover art.

The series is set 13 years after the events of the first Jurassic Park film, as John Hammond’s now-adult granddaughter Lex Murphy works with the United Nations to keep people off of Isla Nublar and Isla Sorna, while her brother Tim tries to redeem their grandfather’s name.

In addition to the new series, IDW has secured the rights to reprint the Topps Jurassic Park comics from the 1990s in a trade paperback.

What did Wizard know about Watchmen 2?

Art Adams art for Wizard's piece on Countdown: Arena

Art Adams art for Wizard's piece on Countdown: Arena

If you’ve been within a six-yard radius of a comics blog over the past day or so, you’ve probably read Rich Johnston’s rumor that DC is planning to release a sequel and/or prequels to Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’s stone-classic superhero landmark, Watchmen. The thinking is that whatever his issues with Moore, and vice versa, former President Paul Levitz kept the kibosh on any further use of the Watchmen world and characters, and that with him gone, Senior Vice President-Executive Editor Dan DiDio is opening the door to such projects.

We can’t speak to the veracity of the rumor — nor will DC, who told Robot 6 the company has no comment. But as an ex-Wizard employee, I can clear up some things regarding one of Johnston’s bits of evidence. He writes:

But there were moves. A Wizard splash showing DC’s Countdown multiverse had Rorschach as one of the combatants and it was rumoured one of the universes in the DC 52 Multiverse was intended to be the Watchmen world.

The piece Johnston’s talking about was done toward the tail end of my time with the company in 2007, during a period when I was working primarily on the website rather than the magazine, but I do know how it went down.

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Six by 6 | Six great comics published by Comico

Grendel

Grendel

The birth of the direct market brought a slew of new independent publishers in the 1980s, including First Comics, Eclipse and Comico. It was the latter that really made an impact on both myself and Strangeways creator Matt Maxwell at the time.

In an email discussion earlier this week about 1980s comics, the subject turned to Comico, and Matt and I started listing some of our favorite series by the publisher. So when I decided to make them the focus of this edition of Six by 6, I reached out to Matt to see if he’d be interested in helping me out this week. “I started expanding my horizons right about the time they started publishing comics,” he told me, a sentiment I can echo. Elementals, in fact, may have been the first non-Marvel/DC comic I ever bought.

So without further ado, here are six great titles (actually seven, if you’ll note how Matt slipped in an extra title in his last entry — sneaky!) that Comico published back in the day.

1. Grendel, written by Matt Wagner, art by Matt Wagner and a host of others: I missed out on the Comico Primer and the very early Grendel material, but I came on board for Devil by the Deed, which was a graphic novel retelling of those stories that came out about the time that the Devil’s Legacy (written by Matt Wagner with art by the Pander Brothers) started up. In short, I was blown away by the range of the themes at play in Wagner’s storytelling (and by the hyper-stylized renderings of the Panders.) The first convention sketch I paid for was a Christine Spar Grendel (right before I got Stephen Bisette to draw Cthulhu). Grendel really was a comic for grownups when such a thing was a comparative rarity. I can’t do it justice in the time I have here, but really, every fan of sequential storytelling owes it to themselves to catch up on this book, which I believe is being reprinted in its entirety by Dark Horse. Romance, treachery, betrayal, crime, noir, science fiction, dark fantasy, even straight superheroics can be found in the pages of Grendel, not to mention an incredible range of formal techniques and experimentation, and work by artists who are both superstars now and all but forgotten, sadly. (Matt Maxwell)

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Talking Comics with Tim: Nate Powell

Swallow Me Whole

Swallow Me Whole

Nate Powell‘s Swallow Me Whole is a graphic novel that demands and warrants repeated readings. Released by Top Shelf last year, the publisher describes it as “a love story carried by rolling fog, terminal illness, hallucination, apophenia, insect armies, secrets held, unshakeable faith, and the search for a master pattern to make sense of one’s unraveling.” My thanks to Powell for this email interview and his level of candor.

Tim O’Shea: What motivated you to start self-publishing mini-comics at the age of 14?

Nate Powell: Well, I’d been drawing comics with a few friends for a couple of years already. We had many issues of a comic series mapped out, and a friend’s uncle suggested that we finish up each issue and self-publish it. We didn’t really know what that entailed, but soon discovered a few neglected copy machines around town and in my dad’s office. We made 100 copies of the first comic, and they all sold in about two months; we’d never anticipated recovering our expenses, or anyone actually BUYING the books, to be honest. We just wanted to have a comic too, and found the most accessible way to make them. At this time I was already into the punk subculture and had been exposed to people who made zines and released records in much the same manner, but it was not until a few years later when I started writing zines and putting out records that I saw the inherent connections between these two realms of DIY entrepreneurship.

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