auctions Archives | Robot 6 | The Comics Culture Blog

Comics A.M. | Unpublished Joe Kubert cover sells at auction

battle-classics3-social

Auctions | Joe Kubert’s original cover art for “Battle Classics” #3, signed by the artist, sold for $8,360 at auction earlier this month at Philip Weiss Auctions in Lynbrook, New York. The series was canceled after the first issue, so the cover was never published; it came directly from the artist’s estate. A second Kubert original, the cover for “Mystery in Space” #111, went for $6,038. [Artfix Daily]

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Comics A.M. | Maggin, Hughes, to receive Bill Finger Awards

Herbie the Fat Fury

Herbie the Fat Fury

Awards | A committee chaired by writer and historian Mark Evanier has chosen Elliot S! Maggin and Richard E. Hughes as the recipients of this year’s Bill Finger Awards, which honor writers whose work has not gotten the recognition it deserves. Maggin is a longtime comics writer whose credits include Green Arrow, Batman, Justice League, Peter Parker, Strange Sports Stories, and the Marvel Classics version of The Iliad. Hughes, who died in 1974, was a prolific writer who worked under a number of pen names. He created The Black Terror for Standard Comics in the 1940s and later became editor at American Comics Group, where he scripted many comics. He is the co-creator of Herbie Popnecker, the Fat Fury, who later got his own comic. The awards will be presented at the Eisner Awards ceremony at Comic-Con International in San Diego. [Comic-Con International]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Hi Score Girl’ to return following copyright dispute

hi score girl-manga

Manga | Rensuke Oshikiri’s romantic comedy manga Hi Score Girl will resume serialization in Square Enix’s Monthly Big Gangan magazine, after a lengthy hiatus due to copyright issues. The manga was suspended in 2014 after the game company SNK Playmore filed a criminal complaint against Square Enix, claiming the manga used characters from SNK’s games without permission. Copyright violations are taken seriously in Japan: Police raided Square Enix’s offices, and the publisher not only stopped selling the series but issued a recall. Although Square Enix filed a counterclaim, Tokyo police initiated charges against 16 people, including Oshikiri and Square Enix staffers. The parties agreed on a settlement in August 2015. In addition to resuming serialization of the series, Square Enix will publish the sixth volume and new editions of the first five. [Anime News Network]

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Original ‘Tintin’ art sells at auction for $1.2 million

tintin-king-ottokar3

The original artwork for the final two pages of the 1939 Tintin comic King Ottokar’s Sceptre sold at auction Saturday in Paris for €1.05 million, or about $1.2 million.

Another two-page spread from the same book sold at auction last fall for $1.7 million. While that’s a hefty sum, it’s not a record price for Tintin art: That belongs to a 1939 illustration signed by creator Hergé, which fetched $2.9 million in 2014.

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Comics A.M. | Ringleader gets 20 years in death of comic collector

"The Human Torch" #23 was among the comics in Marciniak's collection

“The Human Torch” #23 was among the comics in Marciniak’s collection

Legal | Rico J. Vendetti of Rochester, New York, was sentenced to 20 years in prison Wednesday for planning a 10 home-invasion robbery that led to the death of 78-year-old comic book collector Homer Marciniak. According to prosecutors, Vendetti had been running eBay scams for years, selling merchandise shoplifted by others, and planned to do the same with Marciniak’s $30,000 collection of comics, which dated back to the 1930s. During the home invasion, the robbers hit Marciniak, threatened him and tied him up; he died shortly afterward. Vendetti pleaded guilty to a federal racketeering charge. Co-defendant Donald Griffin, who admitted hitting Marciniak, was also sentenced to 20 years in prison this week. [Buffalo News]

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Comics A.M. | Rare original ‘Tintin’ art goes up for auction

tintin-social

Auctions | Hold on to your wallet, there’s another comics auction in the offing. This one, at the French auction house Artcurial, will feature a number of pieces by Tintin creator Hergé, including the final spread from King Ottokar’s Sceptre, a sketch for The Castafiore Emerald, and a full page from Quick et Flupke, one of his less famous comics. [Business Insider]

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Comics A.M. | Tracing Batman and Robin’s history of gay subtext

batman-robin

Comics | In an excerpt adapted from his new book The Caped Crusade: Batman and the Rise of Nerd Culture, Glen Weldon delves into the long history of the gay subtext in the relationship between Batman and Robin, noting that it’s been there from the Boy Wonder’s 1940 debut: “Remember: Queer readers didn’t see any vestige of themselves represented in the mass media of this era, let alone its comic books. And when queer audiences don’t see ourselves in a given work, we look deeper, parsing every exchange for the faintest hint of something we recognize. This is why, as a visual medium filled with silent cues like body language and background detail, superhero comics have proven a particularly fertile vector for gay readings over the years. Images can assert layers of unspoken meanings that mere words can never conjure.” [Slate.com]

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Comics A.M. | Cartoonist Ted Rall sues Los Angeles Times

Ted Rall's crosswalk cartoon for the Los Angeles Times

Ted Rall’s crosswalk cartoon for the Los Angeles Times

Legal | Political cartoonist Ted Rall has sued the Los Angeles Times, claiming the newspaper defamed him and unfairly fired him from his position as a freelance cartoonist. In May 2015, Rall wrote a blog post for new newspaper’s website about being mistreated, handcuffed and “roughed up” by Los Angeles police when he was stopped in 2001 for jaywalking. Two months later, the L.A. Times published a column that cast doubt on Rall’s account, and announced it would no longer carry his work. Rall protested and later claimed that an audiotape of the incident supported his side of the story, although the paper found otherwise. In the lawsuit, filed Monday in Los Angeles Superior Court, Rall claims the Times defamed him by questioning his veracity. The paper’s response: “The Times will defend itself vigorously against Mr. Rall’s claims.” [Los Angeles Times]

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Rare Spider-Man comic sells at auction for record price

amazing fantasy15

A rare near-mint copy of Marvel’s Amazing Fantasy #15, featuring the 1962 debut of Spider-Man, sold at auction Thursday for $454,100.

Heritage Auctions said that’s the most ever paid at public auction for a Spider-Man comic (as The Associated Press notes, a near-mint copy of the same comic reportedly fetched $1.1 million in a private sale in 2011).

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Comics A.M. | Near-mint ‘Amazing Fantasy’ #15 could sell for $400K

amazing fantasy15

Auctions | A near-mint copy of Marvel Amazing Fantasy #15, featuring the 1962 first appearance of Spider-Man, is expected to sell for more than $400,000 at auction later this month. “We think this comic has the potential to realize the highest price ever paid at public auction for a Spider-Man comic book,” said Lon Allen, managing director of the comics department at Heritage Auctions. “It could soar well past our estimate.” [Fine Books & Collections]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Tintin’ original art fetches $1.2 million at auction

From "The Blue Lotus," by Herge

From “The Blue Lotus,” by Herge

Auctions | A rare drawing of Tintin by Hergé from the 1936 book The Blue Lotus was sold at auction Monday in Hong Kong for $1.2 million. The black-and-white illustration, which depicts Tintin and Snowy being pulled in a rickshaw through the streets of Shanghai, is the only original piece from the book that remains in private hands. [BBC News]

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Comics A.M. | ‘The Beano’ sets Guinness World Record

The Beano #3800

The Beano #3800

Comics | Issue 3800 of the British comic The Beano hit newsstands last week, making it officially, according to Guinness World Records, the longest-running weekly comic. Artist David Sutherland, who has been drawing the Bash Street Kids since 1961, unveiled the official plaque at Beano headquarters. [Down the Tubes]

Auctions | A copy of Suspense Comics #3, published in 1944, sold for $173,275 at auction last month, setting a new record for a non-superhero comic. The high price was probably due to the cover, by Alex Schomburg, which features a woman tied up and apparently about to be sacrificed by Nazis and the KKK, a crossover that would attract potential buyers from several groups of enthusiasts (this issue was described in an earlier auction as a ““Nazi/Bondage/Horror/War hybrid”). Plus it’s rare — the lurid cover may have suppressed sales when it was first published — and in good condition. [Observer]

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Here’s your chance to wield Hellboy’s Right Hand of Doom

right hand5

If you’ve been hoping to jump-start Ragnarok or merely lay a smackdown on some supernatural foes, here’s your chance: Hellboy’s Right Hand of Doom is up for sale.

The replica from Guillermo del Toro’s 2004 adaptation Hellboy is just one of the items going on the block Friday in Los Angeles as part of the “Rick Baker: Monster Maker” auction. Organized by the Prop Store, the sale features more than 400 items from the Hollywood effects legend’s lengthy career.

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Comics A.M. | ‘Asterix’ art raises $158K for ‘Charlie Hebdo’ victims

Asterix and the Laurel Wreath

Asterix and the Laurel Wreath

Auctions | A page of original artwork from 1971’s Asterix and the Laurel Wreath sold at auction Sunday for more than $158,000, with proceeds going to benefit the families of those killed in the attack on Charlie Hebdo‘s offices. The art included a special dedication by Asterix co-creator Albert Uderzo, who came out of retirement in the days after the attack to draw tributes to the victims. The auction house Christie’s waived its commission for Sunday’s sale. [BBC News]

Political cartoons | Ecuadorean cartoonist Xavier Bonilla, who has been sued, threatened and reprimanded by his own government because of his political cartoons, revealed last week that he has also received threats from an Ecuadorean member of ISIS over a cartoon making fun of the extremist group. While he ultimately decided the threat wasn’t credible, Bonilla said, “It has to be understood within this climate of hostility and harassment that’s been created within the country. It’s gotten to the point where even humor is being persecuted and oppressed by the president.” Reporter Jim Wyss also looks at some other cases of government suppression of political cartoons in Latin America [Miami Herald]

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Comics A.M. | Sotheby’s comics art auction rings up $4.1 million

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

Auctions | Sotheby’s auction of comics and comics art over the weekend in Paris brought in about $4.1 million for 189 works, including Hergé’s cover art for the 10th-anniversary issue of Le Petit Vingtième (the magazine where Tintin first ran), several Tintin pages, and pieces by Hugo Pratt, Charles Burns and Osamu Tezuka. An acrylic and crayon illustration by Dave Stevens created in 1988 for the first issue of The Rocketeer Adventure Magazine (at right) fetched $66,017, a record for the late artist’s work. [Paul Gravett, Artnet]

Creators | “Hobbes was as much my alter-ego as Calvin was”: In an excerpt from the new book Exploring Calvin and Hobbes, Bill Watterson talks about how he came to comics, how he developed the style and characters of Calvin and Hobbes, and the continuing popularity of the strip years after it stopped running in newspapers. [Comic Riffs]

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