Batman Begins Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Cruise Gotham in style in this $1 million Batmobile

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If Hammacher Schlemmer‘s $200,000 licensed, street-legal 1966 Batmobile is a little too cheap, or a little too dated, for your tastes, allow us to this roadworthy replica on the Tumbler from Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy. Listed on the James Edition luxury goods website, the vehicle will only set you back … $1 million.

But, hey, it’s worth it: This concept car — it’s “inspired by the movie Batman Begins” — comes equipped with an eight-cylinder LS1 engine, four 44-inch super swamper tires with custom rims, five driver-assist cameras and a stereo with blue tooth, CD/DVD and iPod integration. Plus, it’s a limited edition; there are just five of these in the world.

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Quote of the Day | ‘Lucius Fox … bought my new house’

Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox in "The Dark Knight Rises"

Morgan Freeman as Lucius Fox in “The Dark Knight Rises”

“When I work for DC, anything I create I get a piece of. Lucius Fox, for example, who was in the last trilogy of Batman movies played by Morgan Freeman, bought my new house. At Marvel, I did see a check off The Wolverine, the current film. But as a rule I don’t any of the ancillary money off of all of the toys and soaps and shampoos and skateboards and God knows what else that features the character.”

– veteran writer and editor Len Wein, who co-created the Batman supporting character Lucius Fox and the wildly popular Wolverine, talking about his compensation for film adaptations during a Television Critics Association panel for the upcoming PBS miniseries Superheroes: A Never-Ending Battle.

According to TheWrap, Wein said that although there have been six movies featuring Wolverine, “esoteric rules” mean that he was only compensated for the most recent one, because it was named for the character. The requirements are so strict that he didn’t receive a check for 2009′s X-Men Origins: Wolverine.

Comics-based movies: Breaking ‘the book was better’ rule

iron-man-poster-2

“Demon in a Bottle” will probably be better since well, you know…

Are you getting excited? New teasers and trailers are being released almost every day now. The countdown to Summer Movie Season is officially on, and the big blockbusters adapting comics are looking promising. Iron Man 3 has an armada of armors flying around; can’t really go wrong there. The Wolverine has ninjas as far as the eye can see. And the bearded and brooding Man of Steel might even end up being good. Throw in a little Kick-Ass 2 and RED 2, sprinkle with R.I.P.D. and 300: Rise of an Empire, and top it off with 2 Guns, and you’ve got yourself one fun summer.

While we still get clunkers, the ratio of good to suck has definitely improved. It used to be that the old chestnut response to a movie adapted from a novel could be more often than not applied to movies adapted from comics: The book was better. And it’s often still true. But there are times when the movies do it better than comics, and while that’s great for the filmmakers and audiences, in a way it’s an indictment on the comics-makers.

Comics offer more boundless creativity than almost any medium. With comics, there’s no studio executive, no creation-by-committee made up of shareholders and board members with less experience creating and telling stories than their companies’ interns. It’s why Tony Stark being an alcoholic doesn’t fly with Disney and was removed from Iron Man 3. Comics can still include collaboration and compromise but they can just as easily be the result of a single voice. Even with the most heavy-handed editorially mandated comics, they’re still created by a fraction of people needed to make a Hollywood movie. Comics are generally more spontaneous, imaginative and clever than most major studio movies. But sometimes, Hollywood gets the jump on comics.

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Stan Lee hilariously fixes movie endings by adding more Stan Lee

stan-lee-star-wars

Stan Lee, who knows a thing or two about storytelling, has teamed with the animators at How It Should Have Ended to right a handful of cinematic wrongs, primarily by inserting himself into pivotal moments of films ranging from Star Wars: A New Hope to Inception to Batman Begins.

“Now that I’ve done so many unforgettable cameos, I have become an expert at all kinds of movies,” the 90-year-old creator says in the video posted on his YouTube channel. “One thing, though, that bothers me: So many of the endings of famous movies are wrong.”

But Lee isn’t content to merely alter some memorable scenes; he also imagines himself changing the course of history by ensuring three blockbusters were never made.

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Christian Bale’s phone call brings a smile to young cancer patient

Zach Guillot receives a call from Christian Bale

For all of the ridicule Christian Bale received for his 2008 tirade on the set of Terminator Salvation, it turns out the Oscar winner is a kindhearted guy, visiting with victims of the shooting at The Dark Knight Rises screening in Aurora, Colorado, and flying the family of a 4-year-old cancer patient to have lunch with him at Disneyland. And now the actor has put a smile on the face of an 8-year-old Batman fan who’s battling leukemia.

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Butcher Billy mashes together Burton and Nolan’s versions of Batman


Butcher Billy
, the Brazilian artist sometimes known as Bily Mariano da Luz, is turning into something of a Robot 6 favorite. His latest project posted at Behance is “Batman: The Nolan X Burton Experiment,” smashing together Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman and Christopher Nolan’s Dark Knight trilogy to sometimes humorous, often illuminating, effect. By placing their differing elements in proximity, these images reveal both what was good and what failed from these two adaptations. (Such as, hey Tim, you cast Lando Calrissian as Harvey Dent, then do absolutely nothing of consequence with the character in either of your films? What was that all about?)

As Bily writes: “But are they really that different? How much of all that is really classic and timeless and how much is pure recycling to modern times? Are those elements cool enough to stand even if taken from their own environments? How those concepts would work if they were mixed into one another?”

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