Best of 7 Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

The Flash, by way of Ingmar Bergman

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[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

Mash-up parody movie trailer may be one of my biggest guilty pleasures.  Back in the day when it was novel, I loved watching videos of Mary Poppins as a horror movie or the 1966 Batman movie as a modern day action extravanganza.  I learned to appreciate parody trailers thanks to Jim Emerson, a blogger at RogerEbert.com, who once cited the “Shining” parody trailer (which turned the psychological horror film into a sappy family movie) as an example of the fine art of film editing.  The whole movie parody trailer craze may have fallen in and out of favor with the fickle whims of the internet audience, but I personally have never stopped loving them.

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Death of Archie brings life to series finale

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[Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

One has to assume the death of Archie was in the back of the publisher’s mind when it first conceived the Life with Archie relaunch (a series of the same name ran from 1958 to 1991). Like many people after the initial novelty of adult Archie getting married, I lost interest in the series. But reading Life with Archie #36 made me realize I likely missed out on some interesting storytelling.

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Changes to the Bat-books show DC stepping out of the man cave

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Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.

This week DC Comics announced a big change in Batgirl: namely, a new creative team of writers Cameron Stewart and Brenden Fletcher and artist Babs Tarr. Coming aboard with October’s Issue 35, they bring a nifty new look and setting. After three years of grim but determined storytelling from writer Gail Simone and various artists (most recently Fernando Pasarin), Barbara Gordon is heading into Gotham’s “hip border district” for graduate school, and she’s leaving all the bad times behind.

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Jetpacking back to 1980s New York with ‘Rocket Girl’

rocket girl-v1Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.

Rocket Girl, Vol. 1
By Brandon Montclare and Amy Reeder
Image Comics

This week marked the release of Amy Reeder and Brandon Montclare’s Rocket Girl in trade paperback, which is probably the best way to read it, as the time-travel story is a bit confusing. It’s a fun read nonetheless, especially for those of us who are still waiting for our jetpacks to arrive.

Dayoung Johansson is a 15-year-old girl who travels from 2013, where all New York police officers are teenagers, to the much grittier 1986 version of the Big Apple, to stop a group of scientists from getting a piece of tech that would allow their company to become a mega-corporation that has corrupted the city. The twist is, that if she succeeds, Dayoung will destroy her own future.

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The mystery of ‘Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye’ #31

transformers-mtmte31Editor’s note: Each Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss the best in comics from the last seven days — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.

There were a lot of debut issues I was looking forward to this week. Grayson #1, because what can go wrong with the former Robin being a super-spy? Spider-Man 2099 #1, in which Peter David returns to writing my favorite future webslinger. While those comics were fine (with a slight nod to Grayson), I have to say my most satisfying read was once again about Giant Robots Who Transform Into Other Things. I’m talking about Transformers: More Than Meets the Eye #31.

Written by James Roberts, the issue kicks off with the crew abandoning the disintegrating Lost Light and scattered among several escape vessels. The story centers around the 20 robots stuck on the Rod Pod, a ridiculous contraption shaped to look like Rodimus’ head. Among the crew is new captain/new Autobot/former Decepticon Megatron, grizzled old doctor Ratchet, former antagonist Cyclonus and detective Nightbeat.

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Ellis, Shalvey present the best fight scene in ‘Moon Knight’ #5

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

Warren Ellis and Declan Shalvey’s run on Moon Knight may be short, but boy has it been memorable.

This past Wednesday the duo’s penultimate issue came out, featuring what Ellis called “Our Definition Of A Tony Jaa/ RAID Boombastic Thai Style.” The plot of the issue is pretty simple: A young girl’s been kidnapped, and Moon Knight heads into a building to save her. What follows is nothing short of awesome, as our hero heads up the stairs and encounters all manners of obstacles in his quest to find the girl in what has to be the best-drawn fight scene of the week — heck, possibly the year so far — if of course we’re counting this issue as one long fight scene (which I am). Moon Knight takes on everyone from your regular run-of-the-mill punks with easily broken noses:

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Lighten up, Superman

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

The first official image of Superman in Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice was released! As a huge fan of the Big Blue Boy Scout, I couldn’t be more thrilled. Not for the movie, which kinda seems like a mess. No, I’m excited because once again the internet is abuzz over what Superman should or shouldn’t be. Should he be the grim protector of the night as portrayed in the poster or in Zack Snyder’s fondest dreams? Or should he be the brightly colored Silver Age symbol of the outdated notions of Truth, Justice, and the American way? Maybe he should be Electric Blue Superman? (Just kidding. No one likes Electric Blue Superman.)

In my case, the first salvos have already been fired about turning this into a meme. The Ben Affleck photo of Batman standing next to his ride already launched a pretty amusing “Sad Batman” meme. What heights can the Man of Steel attain? Graphic designer Lee Binding has already decided to cheer up poor Clark with a smile and some balloons. It’s already a huge improvement!

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Nothing says ‘summer reading’ like a trip to Antarctica

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

I love a good cold-weather book to take the edge off the summer heat, and summer is the time to read Nick Bertozzi’s Shackleton, the story of the ill-fated Imperial Trans-Arctic Expedition.

When Ernest Shackleton set out to walk across Antarctica, in 1914, the South Pole had already been visited by two explorers, Roald Amundsen and Robert Falcon Scott. The Great War had just begun, and this is quickly put into context: Shackleton realizes that if he doesn’t get his expedition funded now, it may never happen. His plan was to make the first crossing of Antarctica on foot, using two ships; one would drop him and his companions off on one side of the continent, while the other would land on the other side, set up a series of stations with provisions for the traveling party, and then wait to bring them back to England.

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Jim Gibbons seized control of Robot 6′s Tumblr

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

Dark Horse Comics Associate Editor Jim Gibbons is a seasoned social media user. Typically when Jim posts something on his Tumblr, it is something that already was on my radar or something that (thanks to Jim’s post) I put on my radar. A few weeks back, I was considering content that might work best for the Robot 6 Tumblr, when I stumbled upon the idea of somehow tapping into Gibbons’ nose for content. Continue Reading »

Isabel Kickstarts ‘Pole Dancing Adventures’ print edition

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

While I am no master of the vertical pole, and while I’m sure that attempting something like “The Superman” would result in several slipped disks, a concussion, and a few suspicious bruises, I quite liked Leen Isabel’s webcomic Pole Dancing Adventures. It explored pole dancing from the point of view of someone who sees it as an athletic activity, breaking down popular perception that it’s something anyone should be ashamed about. It also provided some nifty tips and tricks — again, something I and my ungrateful 200-pound frame would never attempt. Still, an enjoyable peek into the finesse involved.

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‘Dream Another Dream’ will be a dreamy reality

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

At the start of the week, Locust Moon launched their Kickstarter for their Winsor McKay tribute book Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream, and in less than 48 hours, they passed their $50,000 goal. Currently breaking $75,000, the shear care and beauty of this project is breath-taking. The final book will be a giant hardcover at the oversized 16” x 21” dimensions of McKay’s original comic strip Little Nemo in Slumberland, and will sit perfectly beside the award-winning two-volume Splendid Sundays reprint series from Sunday Press.

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IDW’s ‘Wonder Woman’ collection reprints a Golden Age rarity

wonder woman_newspaper_ad_1943[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

For a character who had just debuted a couple of years earlier, the prospect of a Wonder Woman newspaper strip was a clear sign of the Amazing Amazon’s immense popularity. However, in the crowded, competitive field of newspaper comics — where the first Batman newspaper strip lasted only about three years, ironically because it was vying for space against the successful Superman strip — Wonder Woman couldn’t establish herself. Still, IDW has restored what history has all but forgotten, and this August the publisher will reprint the strip’s 19-month run.

I’ve seen a few weeks’ worth of these strips here and there over the years, and they’re a lot like the Golden Age comics. This is hardly surprising, since they were written by creator William Moulton Marston and drawn by original artist Harry G. Peter. However, the newspaper format apparently allowed Marston and Peter to open up their storytelling styles, allowing for a slightly different pace and a more long-form approach.

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What makes HeroesCon so awesome

Skottie!

Skottie!

HeroesCon is my San Diego.

It is my all-time favorite con. Hands down. So the fact my day job kept me out of the country and away from the con for both 2012 and 2013 left me extremely disappointed. The above photo captures what I love about the atmosphere of the con. Creator Skottie Young has never met me. He was in the middle of signing for folks when I asked for a quick photo. The above was his reaction.

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New writing team gives ‘Thunderbolts’ a shot in the arm

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

This isn’t the first time I’ve heard of Ben Acker and Ben Blacker; they’ve been wowing me with their incredible old-time radio podcast, The Thrilling Adventure Hour. This isn’t their first comic book either, as they both brought The Thrilling Adventure Hour to graphic novel life, wrote Wolverine: Season One and were also tapped to write Deadpool Annual #1.. There’s really nothing new about this title, as they don’t even start with a #1; instead, we pick up mid-shenanigans with Thunderbolts #27.

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‘Trees’ for free

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[Editor’s note: Every Sunday, Robot 6 contributors discuss “The best in comics from the last seven days” — from news and announcements to a great comic that came out to something cool creators or fans have done.]

A new Warren Ellis comic book, particularly a new creator-owned Warren Ellis comic book, is a big deal. Trees has the added bonus of absolutely fantastic art by Jason Howard. Image Comics celebrated the release by making the digital version of the first issue free pretty much everywhere.

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