best of the year Archives - Page 2 of 5 - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Good Comics For Kids picks best graphic novels of 2013

March cover (hi-res)Continuing the march of best-of-the-year lists, the School Library Journal’s Good Comics for Kids blog has compiled its list of the Top 10 graphic novels for kids in 2013. It’s a pretty diverse group, ranging from historical fiction to fantasy to biography, with Abrams, First Second and Top Shelf well-represented:

  • Fairy Tales Comics, edited by Chris Duffy(First Second)
  • Odd Ducks, by Cecil Castellucci and Sara Varon (First Second)
  • Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong, by by Prudence Shen and Faith Erin Hicks (First Second)
  • Nathan Hale’s Hazardous Tales: The Donner Dinner Party, by Nathan Hale (Abrams)
  • Monster on the Hill: Book One, by Rob Harrell (Top Shelf)
  • Dogs of War, by Sheila Keenan and Nathan Fox (Graphix)
  • Bluffton: My Summers with Buster Keaton, by Matt Phelan (Candlewick)
  • March: Book One, by Rep. John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell (Top Shelf)
  • Hilda and the Bird Parade, by Luke Pearson (Nobrow)
  • The Misadventures of Salem Hyde, Book One: Spelling Trouble, by Frank Cammuso (Abrams)

Follow the link to read about the Good Comics For Kids bloggers have to say about each of the selections.

A dozen graphic novels rank among NPR’s great reads of 2013

captain marvel-v1On the heels of Time magazine, National Public Radio has released a substantial list of the best books of 2013, which includes a dozen comics and graphic novels among its more than 200 titles (although, granted, not all of them are strictly “comics”). A handful of the selections should by now be familiar from previous best-of lists:

  • Battling Boy, by Paul Pope (First Second)
  • Boxers & Saints, by Gene Luen Yang (First Second)
  • Captain Marvel, Vol. 1: In Pursuit of Flight, by Kelly Sue Deconnick, Dexter Soy and Emma Rios (Marvel)
  • Gris Grimly’s Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley and Gris Grimly (Balzer+Bray)
  • Hand-Drying in America and Other Stories, by Ben Katchor (Pantheon)
  • Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened, by Allie Brosh (Touchstone)
  • Julio’s Day, by Gilbert Hernandez (Fantagraphics)
  • New School, by Dash Shaw (Fantagraphics)
  • Relish: My Life in the Kitchen, by Lucy Knisley (First Second)
  • Super Graphic: A Visual Guide to the Comic Book Universe, by Tim Leong (Chronicle Books)
  • The Encyclopedia of Early Earth: A Novel, by Isabel Greenberg (Little, Brown and Company)
  • You’re All Just Jealous of My Jetpack: Cartoons, by Tom Gauld (Drawn and Quarterly)

‘Time’ names ‘Sex Criminals’ top comic of 2013

sex criminals1The parade of best-of-the-year lists continues apace, with critic Douglas Wolk selecting Time magazine’s Top 10 Comics and Graphic Novels of 2013:

  1. Sex Criminals, by Matt Fraction and Chip Zdarsky (Image Comics)
  2. The Phoenix: The Weekly Story Comic, by various (David Fickling Books)
  3. Saga, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (Image Comics)
  4. Fran, by Jim Woodring (Fantagraphics)
  5. Boxers & Saints, by Gene Luen Yang (First Second)
  6. Zombo: You Smell of Crime and I’m the Deodorant!, by Al Ewing and Henry Flint (2000AD)
  7. Hand-Drying in America and Other Stories, by Ben Katchor (Pantheon)
  8. Very Casual: Some Stories, by Michael DeForge (Koyama Press)
  9. Bad Houses, by Sara Ryan and Carla Speed McNeil (Dark Horse)
  10. Incidents in the Night, Vol. 1, by David B. (Uncivilized Books)

Visit Time to read Wolk’s comments about each title.

The best of the best-of-the-year lists (Part 1)

beautiful creatures mangaIt’s December, which means best-of-the-year lists, both large and small, will begin appearing at a mind-boggling pace. And while not all of them are comics-specific, many include a smattering of graphic novels and collections. Here are three of the most recent offerings:

For the Best Graphic Novel of 2013, GoodReads members selected Beautiful Creatures: The Manga (Yen Press), Cassandra Jean’s adaptation of the bestselling young-adult novel by Kami Garcia and Margaret Stohl. It beat out such contenders as March Book One, Boxers & Saints and Saga, Vol. 2.

Slate’s list of the Overlooked Books of 2013 includes critic Tammy Oler’s recommendation of Hawkeye, Vol. 1: My Life As a Weapon (Marvel), by Matt Fraction, David Aja and Javier Pulido. “Fraction’s smart writing comes to life in stunning art and innovative panel layouts,” Oler writes, “making Hawkeye deeply entertainingly and moving.”

At Salon, Laura Miller recounts 10 unforgettable graphic novels from 2013: Boxers & Saints, by Gene Luen Yang; Calling Dr. Laura, by Nicole J. Georges; The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, by H.P. Lovecraft and I.N.J. Culbard; Encyclopedia of Early Earth, by Isabel Greenberg; How to Fake a Moon Landing, by Darryl Cunningham; Opera Adaptations, by P. Craig Russell; RASL, by Jeff Smith; The Freddie Stories, by Lynda Barry; The Property, by Rutu Modan; and When David Lost His Voice, by Judith Vanistendael.

Comics A.M. | WonderCon wants ‘to get back to the Bay Area’

WonderCon Anaheim

WonderCon Anaheim

Conventions | Although convention organizers rolled out an altered name — WonderCon Anaheim — and logo when they confirmed two weeks ago that the event will return to Anaheim, California, again next year, they insist they haven’t close the door on San Francisco. “We still want to get back to the Bay Area. [...] We are in touch with [the Moscone Center organizers] fairly regularly and we have an open dialogue,” says David Glanzer, director of marketing and public relations. “They haven’t given up on us, either.” The convention was uprooted from the Moscone Center in 2012 first because of remodeling and now because of scheduling conflicts. WonderCon Anaheim will be held April 18-20. [Publishers Weekly]

Digital comics | I spoke with Archie Comics Co-CEO Jon Goldwater and iVerse Media CEO Michael Murphey about the new “all-you-can-eat” digital service, Archie Unlimited. [Good E-Reader]

Continue Reading »

Goodreads Choice Awards announces comics semifinalists

batman-v2Goodreads has released the semifinalists for its 2013 Goodreads Choice Awards, which, as the name suggests, is a list of the best  books of the year as selected by the website’s readers. The nominees for best graphic novels and comics are:

  • The Walking Dead, Vol. 18, by Robert Kirkman and Charlie Adlard (Image Comics)
  • Blue Bloods: The Graphic Novel, by Melissa de la Cruz, Robert Venditti and Alina Urusov (Disney Press)
  • Batman, Vol. 2, by Scott Snyder, Greg Capullo, Jonathan Glapion, Rafael Albuquerque, Jason Fabok, Becky Cloonan, Andy Clarke, Sandu Florea and James Tynion IV
  • Kick-Ass 2, by Mark Millar and John Romita Jr. (Marvel/Icon)
  • Raven Girl, by Audrey Niffenegger (Abrams ComicArts)
  • Fables, Vol. 18, by Bill Willingham, Mark Buckingham and Gene Ha (Vertigo)
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender: The Search, Part 1, by Gene Luen Yang, Michael Dante DiMartino, Bryan Konietzko and Gurihiru (Dark Horse)
  • Chew, Vol. 6, by John Layman and Rob Guillory (Image Comics)
  • Calling Dr. Laura: A Graphic Memoir, by Nicole J. Georges (Mariner Books)
  • Saga, Vol. 2, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (Image Comics)

Continue Reading »

PW’s best children’s books include ‘Bad Machinery,’ ‘Relish’

delilahdirLagging behind the rest of its list, Publishers Weekly has released its rundown of the best children’s books — split into fiction and nonfiction — which, unsurprisingly, includes a smattering of graphic novels. They are:

Children’s Fiction
Bad Machinery: The Case of the Team Spirit, by John Allison (Oni Press)

Delilah Dirk and the Turkish Lieutenant, by Tony Cliff (First Second)

Boxers & Saints, by Gene Luen Yang (First Second)

Children’s Nonfiction
Relish: My Life in the Kitchen, by Lucy Knisley (First Second)

You’ll undoubtedly notice that three of the four books are from First Second, which, while it’s still early in the best-of season (sure, it’s a season), is off to a strong start: Relish and Boxers & Saints, along with Paul Pope’s Battling Boy, also made it onto the Amazon list, while Yang’s book(s) appears twice on PW’s best of 2013.

Shortlisted just last month for the National Book Award, Boxers & Saints is shaping up to be a strong contender for the big graphic novel of the year, too.

Amazon names best comics and graphic novels of 2013

marble seasonLike clockwork, the editors of Amazon.com have announced their choices for the Best Books of 2013, in categories ranging from History to Literature & Fiction to, yes, Comics & Graphic Novels.

Of course, comics weren’t limited to that one section: While Gilbert Hernandez’s Marble Season was named the best book in Comics & Graphic Novels, it also appeared at No. 71 on the editors’ rundown of the Top 100 of 2013, alongside Rutu Modan’s The Property (No. 80). Here’s the full Comics & Graphic Novels list:

  1. Hyperbole and a Half: Unfortunate Situations, Flawed Coping Mechanisms, Mayhem, and Other Things That Happened, by Allie Brosh (Touchstone)
  2. Batman, Vol. 3: Death of the Family, by Scott Snyder and Greg Capullo (DC Comics)
  3. Saga, Vol. 2, by Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples (Image Comics)
  4. Boxers & Saints, by Gene Luen Yang (First Second)
  5. Battling Boy, by Paul Pope (First Second) Continue Reading »

Publishers Weekly names best comics of 2013

rasl hardcoverAs usual, Publishers Weekly is the first out of the gate with its best-of-the-year lists — if tradition holds, Amazon’s should come along within the next couple of weeks — even if they are a little incomplete (the children’s fiction category is coming “very soon”).

The five titles in the comics category are:

March Book One, by John Lewis, Andrew Aydin and Nate Powell (Top Shelf)

Today Is the Last Day of the Rest of Your Life, by Ulli Lust (Fantagraphics)

The Property, by Rutu Modan (Drawn & Quarterly)

RASL, by Jeff Smith (Cartoon Books)

Boxers and Saints, by Gene Luen Yang (First Second)

Comics A.M. | ‘Infinity’ #1 is this year’s third ‘million-dollar book’

Skottie Young's variant for "Infinity" #1

Skottie Young’s variant for “Infinity” #1

Publishing | ICv2 continues its look at August’s direct market numbers, declaring Marvel’s Infinity #1 a million-dollar book, the third this year to top $1 million in sales, thanks to its $4.99 cover price and estimated orders of 205,000 (DC Comics’ Justice League of America #1 and Superman Unchained #1 are the other two). However, it’s also important to note that Infinity #1 was offered to retailers at a deep discount (up to 70 percent). [ICv2]

Digital comics | Jeff DiBartolomeo explains why he left his job at HBO (he was one of the developers of their HBO Go app) to become chief technical officer at comiXology: “What’s interesting to me is seeing this market, which is one I’m not vary familiar with, and seeing the potential. It’s proving to be useful to have me come [to Comixology] with a different set of eyes, at a different angle.” [TechHive]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | J.K. Woodward reflects on wrath of Hurricane Sandy

J.K. Woodward

Creators | Artist J.K. Woodward (Fallen Angel, Star Trek: The Next Generation/Doctor Who) recounts how he and his wife lost everything but their cat and the clothes they were wearing during Hurricane Sandy — and how what happened afterward changed his perspective: ““When things are going right, you really don’t know what kind of world you’re living in. You tend to be cynical. But there has been such an outpouring of support not just here but from the comics community — we did a podcast interview, for example, and I mentioned how we had to go to the laundromat every day because of our clothing situation. As a result of that, two days later I went to my studio was packed full of care packages with toiletries and other necessities. It showed that what should have been a real tragedy turned into a blessing. It gave me a much more positive outlook.” [The Conway Daily Sun]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Amazing Spider-Man #700 racks up $1.6 million

The Amazing Spider-Man #700

Publishing | The Amazing Spider-Man #700 led the pack in the December comics numbers with 200,000 copies selling to comics shops, and with a cover price if $7.99, it racked up a cool $1.6 million in sales. Avengers #1 sold 186,000 copies but at a more reasonable price, so the dollars didn’t pile up as high for that one. ICv2 also has the December charts for the Top 300 comics and graphic novels in the direct market. John Jackson Miller takes it to the next level with sales estimates for the top 1,000 comics and trades of 2012. [ICv2]

Publishing | At the other end of the scale, Rob Clough talks to Chuck Forsman, the guy behind micropublisher Oily Comics. [The Comics Journal]

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | National Cartoonists Society splits webcomics award

National Cartoonists Society

Awards | The National Cartoonists Society initiated a webcomics award last year, and this year the organization is splitting it in two, one for short-form works and one for long-form. The challenge with including webcomics, says NCS President Tom Richardson, is that to be eligible, creators must make the majority of their money from cartooning. “That isn’t an easy thing to quantify anymore. With online comics, we need to take into account site traffic, professionalism in consistent and regular publication, online community activity and other factors that are the hallmark of professional online work,” he says. “In some cases, it’s pretty obvious the creator is making a career out of cartooning. In some, it’s not so obvious.” [Comic Riffs]

Continue Reading »

Robot 6’s favorite comics of 2012

As ROBOT 6’s fourth-anniversary celebration winds down, our contributors look back at some of their favorite comics of 2012, from Building Stories and Saga to Goliath and Bandette to Life With Archie and Hawkeye.

Brigid Alverson

One of the hazards of writing about comics is that reading comics starts to feel like work after a while. Then I stumble across something really good and I remember why I started doing this to begin with. Here are some of the books that I really enjoyed this year.

Life With Archie: It’s a soap opera. It’s a clever soap opera, and it’s fun to see the characters I knew as a kid grow up and change in surprising ways. The dual storyline is full of twists, but the characters never forget where they came from.

Jiu Jiu: The best shoujo manga captures what it’s like to be a teenage girl and reflects it back in a new way. Jiu Jiu is a supernatural story about an alienated girl who goes to an ordinary high school but fights demons on her off hours. Her companions are two wolves who can change into hot guys, although they never really lose their doggish ways. This is shoujo manga at full strength, with lots of introspection, innuendo, and incongruity. I loved it.

Continue Reading »

Comics A.M. | Cartoonist Richard Thompson’s long journey

Richard Thompson

Creators | Michael Cavna talks to cartoonist Richard Thompson in-depth about his Parkinson’s disease, its effect on his cartooning, and the brain surgery he had this year to combat it, and shows the cartoon Thompson drew during the surgery. The story includes an update on how Thompson has been doing since the surgery and interviews with other cartoonists, including a rare comment from Calvin and Hobbes creator Bill Watterson, about Thompson’s work and his struggle against the illness. [Comic Riffs]

Publishing | The French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo, whose offices were firebombed in 2011 after it published cartoons mocking Mohammed, has released a comic-book biography of the Muslim prophet. Editor Stephane Charbonnier, who has lived under police protection since the magazine first published the cartoons, says the biography is a properly researched educational work edited by Muslims: “I don’t think higher Muslim minds could find anything inappropriate.” [AFP]

Continue Reading »


Browse the Robot 6 Archives