Bill Watterson Archives | Robot 6 | The Comics Culture Blog

‘Hobbes & Me’ puts an off-kilter new spin on a beloved classic

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In the nostalgia-fueled hunt for anything and everything related to Calvin and Hobbes and its reclusive creator Bill Watterson, Hobbes & Me appears to have gone largely unnoticed, at least until now. You’re slipping, internet.

In the 2014 web series, playwright Rafael Casal and rapper/actor Daveed Diggs re-enact 12 of the strips, remaining true to Watterson’s dialogue and staging, while making their own choices with delivery. Diggs, who went on to originate the roles of Thomas Jefferson and Marquis de Lafayette in Hamilton, dons striped pants and faux-tiger fur coat for his performance as Hobbes, while Casal does with the more subdued striped shirt of Calvin.

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Berkeley Breathed’s ‘Calvin and Hobbes’ gag wins April Fools’ Day

breathed-calvin

Bloom County creator Berkeley Breathed kicked off April 1 by announcing that he’s acquired the beloved Calvin and Hobbes from the famously reclusive Bill Watterson, who’s “out of the Arizona facility, continent and looking forward to some well-earned financial security.” Accompanied by a photo of an elderly man who’s definitely not Watterson, it’s a funny enough joke, but Breathed was only getting started.

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Fake ‘Calvin and Hobbes’ strip sells for $14,100

calvin-ebay

A purported original Calvin and Hobbes strip signed by Bill Watterson sold over the weekend on eBay for $14,100. There’s just one problem — well, two if you count the seller had no sales history: It’s the fabled “pills” strip, which pops up from time to time, only to be quickly discredited.

The strip in question is the well-traveled one — it’s sometimes described as the unpublished “final” installment — in which a now-medicated Calvin is more interested in completing his school report than playing with Hobbes, who, in the final heartbreaking panel, reverts to stuffed-animal form. It’s appeared in a variety of formats, both in color and in black and white.

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Angouleme: The Obstacle Race continues

"The Obstacle Race," by Germaine Greer

“The Obstacle Race,” by Germaine Greer

I was an art student in 1979 when Germaine Greer’s The Obstacle Race was published. As it happened, most of the art majors that year were women, and we all read the book and spent late nights in our studios discussing it. Women had been completely absent from our art history courses, and Greer’s book opened our eyes to that fact and the reasons behind it — not a lack of talent, but a lack of recognition and encouragement — and often the deliberate placement of obstacles.

That wasn’t difficult to believe. The university I attended had only admitted women for five years and limited them to 25 percent of the student body at the time.

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‘The Force Awakens’ meets ‘Calvin and Hobbes’ in this adorable mashup

By Brian Kesinger

By Brian Kesinger

As if Star Wars: The Force Awakens doesn’t have us feeling nostalgic enough, Groot artist Brian Kesinger has channeled Bill Watterson in a series of illustrations that merges the galaxy far, far away with the world of Calvin and Hobbes.

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‘Calvin and Hobbes’ turns 30 but remains timeless

calvin and hobbes-social

Thirty years ago today, we learned that tigers can be captured using tuna fish sandwiches.

That’s how cartoonist Bill Watterson introduced the world to precocious 6-year-old Calvin and his cynical stuffed tiger (and best friend) Hobbes. And the rest, as they say, is history.

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Cartoonist translates iTunes Terms and Conditions into downright readable document

Cartoonist R. Sikoryak is graphically translating the iTunes contract in the style of celebrated artists.

Cartoonist R. Sikoryak is graphically translating the entire iTunes contract in the style of comics’ most celebrated luminaries.

The iTunes’ Terms and Conditions agreement has got to be the least-read-yet-most-signed contract in human history. For pages and pages (and a nearly limitless downward digital scroll), it enumerates Apple’s latest subtle shifts in policy regarding the ways we purchase, license and “own” music and media acquired through the most influential online marketplace to date. Who reads those things? Who could even pretend to? Can one even imagine a more arduous task than going through that document, line by line, and trying to parse what exactly it is we are all signing on for?

But ah, the magic of comics. Cartoonist R. Sikoryak, whose work has appeared in Drawn and Quarterly and The New Yorker, is publishing his painstakingly thorough, unabridged graphic adaptation of the iTunes Terms and Conditions agreement on Tumblr. This version of the contract is no mere dry rendering of legalese — instead, Sikoryak has transformed the document into a showcase of styles from talent all across the history of comics, making each page an experiment in the diverse visual language of the medium’s most beloved luminaries.

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Comics A.M. | Roz Chast wins prestigious Reuben Award

Roz Chast

Roz Chast

Awards | Roz Chast won the Reuben Award for cartoonist of the year, presented over the weekend in Washington, D.C., by the National Cartoonists Society. Divisional award winners of note include Jules Feiffer (Kill My Mother) for Graphic Novel, Jason Latour (Southern Bastards) for Comic Book, Danielle Corsetto (Girls with Slingshots) for Online Comics-Short Form, Minna Sundberg (Stand Still, Stay Silent) for Online Comics-Long Form, Hilary Price (Rhymes with Orange) for Newspaper Panel Cartoon, and Stephan Pastis (Pearls Before Swine) for Newspaper Comic Strip. [National Cartoonists Society]

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Comics A.M. | Hammer-wielding woman arrested in store robbery

Conspiracy Comics

Conspiracy Comics

Crime | A comic-shop robbery went awry when the suspect set down her weapon — a hammer — so she could pick up a comic. A woman walked into Conspiracy Comics in Burlington, Ontario, around 8 p.m. Friday and purchased a comic. When the clerk opened the cash register, the customer allegedly pulled out a hammer and said “Empty the till.” When she set down the hammer to pick up the comic, however, another employee grabbed it, gave her the change, and told her to get out. Police checked the hammer for fingerprints and arrested Mary Margaret Ross on charges of robbery. “It was something that was unexpected and shocking,” said store clerk Anton Litvanyi, who wasn’t in the store at the time of the robbery. “At the same time, it is something that is comical … It’s not something that any retailer expects, but especially in a comics store.” [Hamilton Spectator]

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Comics A.M. | Sotheby’s comics art auction rings up $4.1 million

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

The Rocketeer, by Dave Stevens

Auctions | Sotheby’s auction of comics and comics art over the weekend in Paris brought in about $4.1 million for 189 works, including Hergé’s cover art for the 10th-anniversary issue of Le Petit Vingtième (the magazine where Tintin first ran), several Tintin pages, and pieces by Hugo Pratt, Charles Burns and Osamu Tezuka. An acrylic and crayon illustration by Dave Stevens created in 1988 for the first issue of The Rocketeer Adventure Magazine (at right) fetched $66,017, a record for the late artist’s work. [Paul Gravett, Artnet]

Creators | “Hobbes was as much my alter-ego as Calvin was”: In an excerpt from the new book Exploring Calvin and Hobbes, Bill Watterson talks about how he came to comics, how he developed the style and characters of Calvin and Hobbes, and the continuing popularity of the strip years after it stopped running in newspapers. [Comic Riffs]

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Comics A.M. | ‘Attack on Titan’ drives manga sales turnaround

Attack on Titan, Vol. 13

Attack on Titan, Vol. 13

Publishing | Early analysis of 2014 manga sales shows that the category has appeared to turn around, with sales increasing last year, driven by the Attack on Titan juggernaut. [ICv2]

Publishing | Black Mask Studios, which started as the publisher of Occupy Comics and now publishes a number of series in different styles and genres, launched a YouTube channel this week as an outlet for its animation and motion-comics projects. [The New York Times]

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Comics A.M. | Do kids still actually read comic strips?

Big Nate Goes For Broke

Big Nate Goes For Broke

Comic strips | Prompted by the insult-filled message left by an 8-year-old for the newspaper editor who dropped his favorite comics, Michael Cavna asks Big Nate creator Lincoln Peirce whether kids are still even reading comic strips in high numbers. His answer, at least in part: “I’m a firm believer that kids will ALWAYS want their comics…but they’ll want them in whatever formats are the newest and shiniest. So: Yes, kids are still reading plenty of comics. They’re just not reading them in their daily newspapers.” It kicks off an interesting, if brief, discussion with a cartoonist who’s found a great deal of success reaching young readers. Related: Christopher Caldwell looks back on Bill Watterson’s Calvin and Hobbes. [The Washington Post]

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Angoulême International Comics Festival opens

Angouleme poster 2015The 42nd annual Angoulême International Comics Festival kicked off this morning with extra security, as is to be expected just three weeks after the attacks on the Charlie Hebdo offices.

The president of last year’s festival, and the winner of the previous year’s Grand Prix d’Angoulême, was Willem, a staff cartoonist at Charlie Hebdo. He didn’t like to attend staff meetings, so he wasn’t in the office on Jan. 7 when two gunmen killed 12 people, including another Grand Prix winner, Wolinski.

“The 2015 festival will be a time to remember but we also want to demonstrate that life goes on,” said festival director Franck Bondoux. The commemorations include a special exhibit on Charlie Hebdo, a virtual album with contributions by artists from around the world, and a new award, the Charlie Prize, which will be awarded posthumously to the Charlie Hebdo cartoonists this year, and in future years will recognize creators who have fought for freedom of expression. The town of Angoulême will also festooned with posters of Charlie Hebdo covers.

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Comics A.M. | French teen arrested for posting ‘Charlie Hebdo’ parody

From the apparent cartoon in question

From the apparent cartoon in question

Legal | A 16-year-old in Nantes, France, was arrested last week for posting a cartoon on Facebook that mocks the Charlie Hebdo killings; the charge is “advocating terrorism.” The cartoon shows someone holding a copy of Charlie Hebdo and being struck by bullets. Electronic Intifada posts what is most likely the offending cartoon (it had been shared widely on social media), a takeoff on one of the more notorious Charlie Hebdo covers, accompanied by the text, “Charlie Hebdo is shit. It doesn’t stop bullets.” The original cover featured a cartoon of an Egyptian protestor holding the Koran, with text that read, “The Quran is shit, it doesn’t stop bullets.” [France 3]

Publishing | Sales were down in 2014 for Diamond Book Distributors, even though the industry overall had an up year. The reason: DBD lost a key client, Dark Horse, to Random House. Nonetheless, Vice President Kuo-Yu Liang sees good things in store for 2015, including strong sales of indie graphic novels, expanding international sales, and the much-anticipated March: Book Two, which was released this week. [Publishers Weekly]

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10 comic characters drawn in the style of 10 artists

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The comics medium allows for diverse interpretations of characters, both narratively and visually. Artist Jaakko Seppälä has taken 10 of the most iconic comic characters — from Asterix to Batman to Lucy van Pelt — drawn in the style of 10 famous artists (including their respective creators or most popular illustrators).

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