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IDW to debut Berkeley Breathed art book in San Diego

berkeleyworks

Bloom County fans attending Comic-Con International in San Diego have something to look forward to: Not only will creator Berkeley Breathed attend the show, but IDW Publishing will also debut Berkeleyworks, the Art of Berkeley Breathed.

IDW publishes Bloom County: The Complete Library, and IDW’s Scott Dunbier posted the cover on Facebook this weekend: “300-plus pages of beautiful imagery and cutting commentary by the man himself.” Watch for more information on the collection soon. Comic-Con runs July 18-21, with a preview night on July 17.


Food or Comics? | GloriAnaheim chiles

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a splurge item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Fatale, Volume 1: Death Chases Me

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d walk out of the comic store with one book this week Fatale, Vol. 1: Death Chases Me (Image, $14.99). I fell off this book after the first issue, preferring to read in trades, and now that time has come. I’m looking forward to being surprised at what Brubaker and Phillips have done in this first arc as the debut issue was very promising.

If I had $30, I’d load up at Image with Manhattan Projects #4 (Image, $3.50), Prophet #26 (Image, $2.99) and Hell Yeah #4 (Image, $2.99). Prophet is becoming my favorite Image book because it unites my comic heroes of childhood (Prophet!) and one of the top cartoonists out there (Brandon Graham) with a surprising introduction of BD-style science fiction. Hell Yeah is a fun romp reimagining the staples of ’80s and ’90s comics as if John Hughes were the eighth Image founder. Last up I’d get Wolverine and the X-Men #12 (Marvel, $3.99). I was worried this series would get derailed by Avengers Vs. X-Men, but Aaron and Co. have managed to keep it on point as best as conceivably possible. It’s an ideal opening to bring Rachel Summers to the forefront, and the smirking Kid Gladiator on the cover is full of win.

If I could splurge, I’d get Michel Rabagliati’s Song of Roland hardcover (Conundrum Press, $20). I’ll always admire Free Comic Book Day, because it was there that a little Drawn and Quarterly one-shot introduced me to Rabagliati’s work. I’m surprised to see this new volume of his work not published by D&Q, instead published by Canadian house Conundrum. Anyway, this book appears to deal with the death of the father-in-law of the lead character, Paul. It’s been extremely engaging to see Paul grow through the series, and having him deal with events like this as I myself grow up and experience similar events is really touching.

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Food or Comics? | Batwoman, 20th Century Boys, Regenesis and more

Batwoman #2

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a “Splurge” item.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d first grab hold of my favorite of DC’s New 52, Batwoman #2 (DC, $2.99). J.H. Williams III has successfully kept up to the immense expectations he accumulated following his run with Greg Rucka, and the artwork seems to benefit even more by J.H.’s input into the story as co-writer. Next I’d dig down for two of my regular pulls, Northlanders #45 (DC/Vertigo, $2.99) and Uncanny X-Force #16 (Marvel, $3.99). For my final pick, I’d have to miss a bunch of other titles for the chance to get the CBLDF Liberty Annual 2011 #4 (Image, $4.99). I love the anthology format, and having that plus the good cause plus the a-list talent makes it a must get; seriously, can you imagine one comic book containing new work by Frank Quitely, Williams, Mark Waid, J. Michael Straczynski, Matt Wagner AND Craig Thompson? BELIEVE IT!

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Previews: What Looks Good for October

Spera, Volume 1

It’s time once again for our monthly trip through Previews looking for cool, new comics. As usual, we’re focusing on graphic novels, collected volumes, and first issues so that I don’t have to come up with a new way to say, “Jeff Lemire’s Frankenstein is still awesome!” every month. And I’ll continue letting Tom and Carla do the heavy lifting in regards to DC and Marvel’s solicitations.

Also, please feel free to play along in the comments. Tell me what I missed that you’re looking forward to or – if you’re a comics creator – mention your own stuff.

Archaia

The Grave Doug Freshley – A lot of publishers are doing Weird Western comics lately and that’s just fine with me.

Spera, Volume 1 – I like the sound of this fairy tale in which a couple of princesses combine efforts to save their kingdoms. It’s not that I’m anti-prince, but that’s a cool, new way to do that story.

Avatar

Captain Swing and the Electrical Pirates of Cindery Island – Warren Ellis doing Steampunk sounds thrilling, but really all they had to say was “pirates.” I bet this is still really good though, even if you’re pickier than I am.

Boom!

Roger Langridge’s Snarked #1 – After a well-loved zero-issue, Langridge’s version of Wonderland gets its real, official start.

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Food or Comics? | Steak or Schism? Red Wing or Red Wine?

X-Men: Schism

Welcome to Food or Comics?, where every week we talk about what comics we’d buy at our local comic shop based on certain spending limits — $15 and $30 — as well as what we’d get if we had extra money or a gift card to spend on a “Splurge” item. We’re coming a little late today due to a power outage in my neck of the woods — due to a blackout, not because I spent the money for the electric bill on Flashpoint or Fear Itself tie-ins.

Check out Diamond’s release list or ComicList, and tell us what you’re getting in our comments field.

Chris Arrant

If I had $15, I’d make a mad grab for American Vampire: Survival of the Fittest #2 (DC/Vertigo, $2.99); I love what Snyder and Murphy are doing here, and anyone who knows me knows how big a fan I am of Murphy’s work. Next up would be the debut of Jonathan Hickman’s Redwing #1 (Image, $3.50); after seeing Hickman blossom at Marvel, it’s great to see him re-invest in creator-owned comics. Third would be Jason Aaron and Carlos Pacheco’s X-Men Schism #1 (Marvel, $4.99); I have a sense Aaron’s the kind of writer to bring his “A” game when it comes to special stories (he did it recently in Scalped #50), so I’m interested to see what he does here. Last up would be Northlanders #42 (DC, $2.99).

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Opus struts his — or her — feathers on Fringe

Opus the Peahen

Fans of FOX’s Fringe probably caught this on the show’s most recent episode — an “alternate reality” version of Berkeley Breathed’s “Opus” comic strip. Click on over to see the entire strip, courtesy of IDW’s Chris Ryall.

Much like DC’s comic-book plotlines were a little different in the Fringe reality, so too is Breathed’s famed penguin. For one thing, he’s a peahen — and presumably female — in the topsy-turvy world. Some things do remain the same, though — Paris Hilton gossip is still taser-worthy.

IDW takes graphic novels digital

Single-issue comics have been the format of choice on the iPad and iPhone, but IDW is about to change all that: They announced this week that they will offer full-length graphic novels for the iPad. Each graphic novel will be a stand-alone app, priced between $5 and $10.

IDW has never been timid about digital comics, and they are jumping into digital graphic novels with a strong lineup of recent releases: Darwyn Cooke’s Parker: The Outfit, which is making a lot of best-of-the-year lists, for just $9.99, and Cooke’s earlier Parker: The Hunter for $7.99, as well as a Star Trek movie adaptation ($9.99), Vol. 1 of The Bloom County Library ($7.99), Tribes: The Dog Years ($7.99), and After the Fire ($4.99).

This is exactly what comics readers have been saying they want—recent releases priced lower than the print editions. IDW has chosen to release these comics as stand-alone apps, rather than through the IDW or Comics+ apps that carry their single-issue comics. That means iPad users who are not comics readers but are fans of Star Trek or the Parker prose novels have a shot at running across these in the iTunes store.

When IDW launched the Star Trek: Countdown iPhone comic, publisher and director Ted Adams commented, “We will sell as many iTunes apps [of Countdown] as we will of as the print version.” That kind of thinking is clearly behind this move. The initial lineup has an appeal way beyond the traditional comics audience, and by presenting them as single apps, rather than walling them off inside a comics app, IDW has made it more likely that new readers will find them.

(Image taken from the Comics Alliance piece.)


Food or Comics? | This week’s comics on a budget

House of Mystery Halloween Annual #2

House of Mystery Halloween Annual #2

If it’s Tuesday, it must be time for Food or Comics?, where every week some of the Robot 6 crew talk about what comics we’d buy if we were subject to certain spending limits — $15 and $30, as well as if we had extra money to spend on what we call our “Splurge” item. Check out Diamond’s release list to see what arrives in comic shops this week,then play along in our comments section.

JK Parkin

If I had $15 to spend:

Strange Tales 2 #1 ($4.99)
House of Mystery Halloween Annual #2 ($4.99)

Two $5 anthologies that should be well worth the asking price. Strange Tales II, the sequel to Marvel’s indie cartoonist anthology from last year, features new stories by Rafael Grampa, Kate Beaton, Frank Santoro, Dash Shaw, Jeff Lemire, Kevin Huizenga, Jhonen Vasquez and many more. House of Mystery Halloween Annual #2, meanwhile, features stories by folks like Mike Kaluta, Jill Thompson, Chris Roberson, Mike Allred, Matthew Sturges and Peter Milligan. Most notably, it has a new “Lucifer” story by Mike Carey and Peter Gross, which is the big draw for me personally.

Update: I received an advanced copy of this in the mail tonight, and saw that the Madame Xanadu story isn’t actually by Mike Kaluta and Jill Thompson, as was noted in the above-linked CBR story. No, the Madame Xanadu story is actually by Matt Wagner and Brandon Graham. And it is pretty awesome.

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SDCC Wishlist | Bill & Opus vs. Comic-Con

Bloom County T-shirt

Bloom County T-shirt

IDW’s chief creative officer Chris Ryall reveals the artwork for the exclusive Bloom County shirt they’ll sell at their booth this year. The strip’s creator, Berkeley Breathed, will be at their booth during the con to sign it.

IDW will have lots of other con exclusives this year, including a remarqued edition of The Complete Bloom County Library Volume One and copies of True Blood #1 with a foil wrap around cover. You can see all the stuff they’re bringing to the show here.

Comics A.M. | The comics Internet in two minutes

Modesty Blaise

Modesty Blaise

Passings | Writer Peter O’Donnell, creator of the Modesty Blaise comic strip, died May 3 at age 90.  Steve Holland notes that although the prolific novelist suffered from Parkinson’s disease, he “kept in touch with fans and continued to pen introductions for Titan’s Modesty reprints.”

Born in south London on April 11, 1920, O’Donnell wrote such adventure strips as the long-running adaptation of the James Bond novel Dr. No, Garth, and Romeo Brown before being asked in 1962 to create a new character for the Daily Express. He came up with Modesty Blaise, whose catsuit-wearing heroine fought villainy with the help of her right-hand man Willie Garvin. The strip was quickly picked up by the Evening Standard, and ran from May 1963 to July 2002.

O’Donnell also wrote a series of Modesty Blaise novels and, under the pen name of Madeleine Brent, several historical romances. [Bleeding Cool, Guardian, Times Online]

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Breathed and USA Today return to Bloom County (and the ’80s) [Updated]

From the Sept. 29, 1982, "Bloom County"

From the Sept. 29, 1982, "Bloom County"

To mark the release of Bloom County: The Complete Library, Vol. 2, from IDW Publishing, all this week USA Today has been reprinting select installments of the influential ’80s comic strip, along with commentary from creator Berkeley Breathed.

Asked whether there were aspects of the era he wished he’d poked more fun of, Breathed responds: “Honestly, there are those that I wish I’d just ignored. As we edited the new volume of Bloom County cartoons, my editor had to constantly stop me from apologizing for every Michael Dukakis cartoon that I was contractually compelled to include. Those same editors wish me to quickly add that there really are far less Michael Dukakis cartoons than my whining might indicate and don’t let that scare you off. I would only add that one is too many. Sarah Palin was born way, way, way too late. I get Dukakis.”

(via The Daily Cartoonist)

Update: On a related note, IDW is selling a limited edition of Bloom County: The Complete Library, Vol. 1, with an exclusive sketch and signature plate.

Robot reviews: Bloom County and Family Circus

Bloom County: The Complete Library, Vol. 1 hardcover

Bloom County: The Complete Library, Vol. 1 hardcover

Bloom County: The Complete Library, Vol. One: 1980-1982
by Berkeley Breathed
IDW, 288 pages, $39.99.

The Family Circus Library, Vol. 1: 1960-61
by Bil Keane
IDW, 240 pages, $39.99

As more and more publishers realize that comic fans are interested in rummaging though the works of yesteryear, more and more of them are releasing sizable hardcover collections of allegedly classic comics at a breakneck pace. Some of those releases may cause question marks to rise above the heads of persnickety collectors. Take IDW’s new volumes focusing on Berkeley Breathed’s Bloom County and Bil Keane’s Family Circus. Isn’t the former readily available in easy-to-find collections in libraries and used bookstores across the country? Isn’t the latter rather, well, overly precious and saccharine? Does this material really need to be reprinted in such lavish volumes? The answer, surprisingly, is yes and yes.

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Comics A.M. | The comics Internet in two minutes

Dragon Ball

Dragon Ball

Manga | Wicomico County schools in Maryland removed all copies of Akira Toriyama’s Dragon Ball from library shelves Wednesday after the mother of a fourth-grader complained about the nudity and sexual situations depicted in the first volume of the hit series. The manga, which sports an “All Ages” a T+ rating, is published in North America by Viz Media.

A committee of administrators and “people from outside the school system” will review books, but the schools superintendent will make the final decision on the fate of the series. At a Tuesday meeting of the County Council, one councilman distributed photocopies of scenes from Dragon Ball, describing some of the illustrations as “disgusting.” [The Daily Times, The Daily Times]

Legal | An amended agreement between Google and the Authors Guild and the Association of American Publishers is expected to be filed by Friday to address concerns raised by the Google Book Search settlement. DC Comics is among the parties that object to the terms of the original deal, designed to resolve a 2005 lawsuit accusing the Internet giant of infringing on copyrights by digitizing out-of-print books without permission. [Publishers Weekly]

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Comics A.M. | The comics Internet in two minutes

Akira, Vol. 1

Akira, Vol. 1

Publishing | Kodansha confirms what virtually everyone has known for quite a while now: that the publisher — Japan’s largest — is setting up shop in the United States, establishing an office in New York City. Kodansha USA Publishing will launch Kodansha Comics with Katsuhiro Otomo’s Akira and Shirow Masamune’s Ghost in the Shell, two titles that had been licensed in North America by Dark Horse. The company will focus on translating its sizable backlist, but views original publishing as one of its “eventual ambitions.” David Welsh provides a little commentary. [Publishers Weekly]

Publishing | BOOM! Studios has signed a deal with Haven Distributors to distribute second printings of all of the publisher’s monthly titles to direct-market retailers. [BOOM! Studios]

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IDW’s first Bloom County cover takes flight

Bloom County: The Complete Collection, Vol. 1

Bloom County: The Complete Collection, Vol. 1

On his blog, IDW Publisher and Editor-in-Chief Chris Ryall has uveiled the Dean Mullaney-designed cover for Bloom County: The Complete Collection, Vol. 1, due out in October.

Announced in February, the five-volume Bloom County Library will collect Berkeley Breathed’s Pulitzer Prize-winning 1980s comic strip.


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