Boba Fett Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

Boba Fett fan film draws on ‘Star Wars’ Western influences

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Among George Lucas’ myriad influences for Star Wars was the 1968 Sergio Leone classic Once Upon a Time in the West, so it’s only fitting that Eric Raunio should embrace spaghetti Westerns for his short film “Boba Fett: The Twelve Parsec Stare.”

All the elements are in place as the mysterious bounty hunter tracks his target to a dusty saloon in a remote space port, where a banged-up little droid event whistles and chirps a bit of Ennio Morricone’s theme to The Good, the Bad and the Ugly.

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See how Boba Fett escaped the sarlacc in this ‘Star Wars’ fan film

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If you didn’t quite buy that LEGO diorama explanation for how Boba Fett escaped the Great Pit of Carkoon (something to do with a Jawa distillery?), perhaps you’ll find the fan film “Star Wars: Beyond the Dune Sea” more convincing.

Written and directed by Oliver Thompson, the nine-minute short is at turns surreal — the talking disembodied head of a protocol droid? — and obviously low-budget, but clearly made with love for the characters and the Star Wars universe.

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How Boba Fett survived the sarlacc pit, explained with LEGO

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For a character who exuded such coolness in Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back, the once-mysterious Boba Fett suffered such a ludicrous death in Return of the Jedi — he tumbles into the sarlacc pit when a blind Han Solo accidentally ignites his rocket pack — that the fan-favorite bounty hunter just had to be resurrected … in the non-canonical Star Wars Legends, at least.

But surely he didn’t simply crawl out of the Great Pit of Carkoon, where he should’ve been slowly digested for more than a thousand years. That’s … well, as ridiculous as the way he entered. So how did Boba Fett do it? Dan Stoeffler has a theory, which he’s presented entirely in LEGO.

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Ride in superhero style with these custom motorcycle helmets

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Last year we spotlighted a pretty stylish Dark Knight-inspired motorcycle helmet, but what if you prefer, say, The Punisher, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles or Wonder Woman to Batman? AirGraffix has you covered.

The Mattoon, Illinois-based company specializes in custom-painted helmets that can transform the rider into everyone from Goku and Deadpool to Iron Man and Spawn. It’s not all superheroes or comic books, either; there’s an assortment of Star Wars, Transformers and Power Rangers designs, for starters.

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Exclusive first look at Alex Ross Store’s ‘Darth Vader’ variant

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As Comic Book Resources noted earlier this month, painter Alex Ross is creating limited-edition variant covers for Marvel’s new Star Wars titles that will be sold exclusively through the artist’s online store at AlexRossStore.com. We’ve already seen the painting of Luke Skywalker created for Star Wars #1, but today ROBOT 6 can exclusively reveal the Alex Ross Store variant for Star Wars: Darth Vader #1.

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Art Barrage | Fine art’s nerd fetish


As I said a while back, comics seems to be having an increasing influence on fine art and illustration. One aspect of this is fine art fetishizing the iconography of comics. You may already have seen the work of the photorealist Glennray Tutor, and his still lifes of toys and fireworks often positioned around comic art, like the above shot of some marbles illuminating a romance comic. Tutor is using comic art as a signifier of pure Americana, as American as the vinyl Donald Ducks or bottles of hot sauce he also takes as subject matter.

It’s hard not to see his influence upon the painter Matthew Bone. Bone isn’t a photorealist, and he utilizes the artifacts of nerd culture in a similar way to a very different end. His work literally fetishizes comics and toys: a semi-nude woman writhing on a bed of old Marvel comics; a pair of erotically charged models salivating over a Gundam toy; a nude in a Darth Vader helmet clutching handfuls of Storm Trooper action figures to her breasts; another mock-fellating a Gamorean guard toy. The bio on his website claims “by utilizing the conventions of pop culture, and it’s willingness to embrace the artifice as the sincere, Matthew is able to create a re-envisioned modern mythology.” That’s quite a claim for what a less sympathetic critic might just call an inappropriate fixation upon the pop cultural iconography of his youth mixing with a retrogressive view of female sexuality  — NSFW examples below. Also below: Michael Latimer, the street art swiper Lichtenstein, and Sam Spratt.

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