comic art Archives - Robot 6 @ Comic Book Resources

A big dose of Shelf Porn from the Big Easy

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Hello and welcome to Shelf Porn, our weekly look at one fan’s collection. Today’s collection comes from down south, as Scotty in New Orleans shows off his artwork, comics and much more.

If you’d like to see your collection featured here on ROBOT 6, you can find instructions on how to do so at the end of this post.

And now here’s Scotty …

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Dustin Harbin will draw anyone (once) for $50

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If you’re looking for some original art, artist Dustin Harbin has a deal for you: He’ll draw a portrait of any real or fictional person, “as long as they are moderately famous and/or universally recognizable,” for $50.

The catch? He’ll only draw each person once, “so if there’s someone you’re really into, act fast. The only exception to this is if it’s a sufficiently separate instance of that person: i.e young Bill Murray versus older Bill Murray, or Han Solo in his winter gear in Empire Strikes Back, versus his vest-style outfit in Star Wars.”

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Pop culture blogger shows his love for Stephen King, Batman and more

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Happy Saturday and welcome to Shelf Porn, where each week we feature one fan’s collection. Today’s shelves come from Larry Fire, editor of The Fire Wire pop culture blog. Larry shares some nice pics of his Batman stuff (including an awesome Rafael Grampa commission), his Stephen King collection, MONDO posters and more.

If you’d like to see your collection right here on Robot 6, you can find complete details at the end of this post.

And now let’s hear from Larry …

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Pop culture author shares his toys, trades and more

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Happy Free Comic Book Day and welcome to Shelf Porn! Today’s shelves come from Brandon T. Snider, author of The Dark Knight Manual, DC Comics Ultimate Character Guide and many other pop culture books. Brandon shares his collection of trades, toys, art and more.

If you’d like to see your shelves right here on Robot 6, you can find details on submitting them at the end of this post.

And now here is Brandon …

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A massive collection of comics, action figures and … squirrels!

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Hello and welcome to Shelf Porn! Today Corey shares his “nerd cave” with us, where he houses his comics, artwork, an ungodly number of action figures and more — including a shelf that would make Squirrel Girl proud.

If you’d like to share your collection with us, you can find details at the end of this post.

Now let’s hear from Corey …

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This looks like a job for … The Endless!

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We’ve spotlighted the artwork of Ilias Kyriazis before, including his failed Doom Patrol pitch and his vision of what the Avengers might look like in 15 years. And now, to celebrate the launch of The Sandman: Overture, he’s aimed his talent for re-imagining superheroes at the Endless.

Kyriazis, whose professional work includes his self-published graphic novel Elysium Online, has been debuting each member of The Endless over the past few days — so far we’ve seen Dream, a Kirby-esque Despair, Destruction, Desire and Delirium, my personal favorite, with her floating fish bowl.

Check out a few of them below, and be sure to head over to his blog to see the unveiling of Death and Destiny over the next two days.

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Darren Rawlings declares a thumb War of the Green Lanterns

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If you think Marvel and DC can’t get along, artist Darren Rawlings of Thinkmore Studios and The Silver Six has something to say about that in his “Little Friends” series. Each image features characters from both companies coming together, like Black Cat and Catwoman chasing a ball of yarn, Sandman and Clayface building a castle together or, as seen above, Green Lantern and Quasar engaging in a friendly competition.

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Rare comics and original art fetch $4.4 million at auction

John Higgins' color guide for the cover of "Watchmen" #1

John Higgins’ color guide for the cover of “Watchmen” #1

Vintage comics and original comic art brought in $4.4 million over the weekend during a Heritage auction in New York City, Artinfo reports. Among the bigger sales were a CGC-graded 6.5 copy of Detective Comics #27, for $567,625, and John Romita Sr.’s original cover for The Amazing Spider-Man #121, which fetched $286,800.

As we noted on Friday, Dave Gibbons’ original cover art for Watchmen #1 sold for $155,350, with the first three covers going for a combined $216,892.50. John Higgins’ color guide for the first cover was bought for $7,767.50. The remaining covers for the 12-issue landmark series are expected to go up for auction later this year.

Wired.com delves into the history of the 12 covers, which were purchased at a Sotheby’s auction in 1993 by former Wizard Publisher Gareb Shamus for what’s been reported to be in the neighborhood of $26,000. The article doesn’t repeat that figure, but it does say what was paid was “a bargain price” (for instance, Higgins’ color guide for the cover of Watchmen #1 was picked up for $50, which was then five to 10 times the usual price).

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Rare original Calvin and Hobbes strip goes up for auction

Three months after an original 1986 Sunday installment of Calvin and Hobbes, drawn and hand-colored by Bill Watterson, sold for $203,150, another original strip is going on the auction block.

Like the previous piece, this daily strip was part of a 1986 swap between Watterson and Adam@Home and Red and Rover cartoonist Brian Bassett. However, The Daily Cartoonist notes that while Bassett sold the other original to help with the expenses of a divorce and upcoming marriage, this one is being offered by his ex-wife Linda through Heritage Auctions (both are signed by Watterson to Brian and Linda).

The strip, part of Heritage’s Feb. 21-23 Vintage Comics & Comic Art Signature Auction in New York City, has already garnered a top online/telephone bid of $15,000. The company cautions, “We know you’ve heard us say this before, but consider this a rare opportunity that may not be repeated for a long time to come. We have no more Watterson Calvin originals ‘waiting in the wings’ to trot out next time around.”

See the full strip below.

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Watch Paolo Rivera draw a Daredevil cover in 11 minutes

Yes, I realize I just posted something about Paolo Rivera on Friday, but this is too good to pass up: The artist has put together a time-lapse video detailing his process for Daredevil #22 (above). It’s at 20 times the normal speed, compressing three hours of work into just 11 minutes.

“It’s a pretty straight forward time lapse, but there are 3 things that I’d like to point out as you watch,” Rivera writes on his blog. “First, I use reference of my own hand to facilitate the drawing process. This photo is taken on the fly using Photo Booth on my iMac. It’s as easy as using a mirror, but with more options. Second, I employ a digital perspective template of my own design for the background. It’s extremely useful, but has a steep learning curve — I plan on releasing it to the public later this year. Lastly, toward the end of the video, you can see that I had trouble with Daredevil’s legs as he’s scaling Stilt-Man’s serpentine legs. The cover as a whole went pretty smoothly, but it took me a long time to find a pose for him that didn’t look totally awkward to me. Spidey, on the other hand, was a breeze — characters who are flying/falling are always easier to draw since they don’t have to interact with any other entities.”

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Dave Gibbons’ iconic Watchmen cover art heads to auction

Dave Gibbons' original cover art for "Watchmen" #1

The iconic blood-splattered smiley face cover for Watchmen #1 is among a handful of original artwork from the seminal 1986 miniseries by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons up for sale next month as part of a Heritage Auctions signature auction in New York City.

Described by the auction house as “historic” and a “DC masterwork,” the 10-inch by 15-inch image is joined by Gibbons’ covers for Watchmen #2 and #3, John Higgins’ color guide for the cover of Issue 1, a page from Issue 7, and a page and color guide from Issue 8.

The pieces are part of the $1.4 million Shamus Modern Masterworks, accumulated in the 1980s and ’90s by retailer Martin Shamus, father of Wizard magazine founder Gareb Shamus. Consigned last year to Heritage, the collection already has produced one remarkable sale: Todd McFarlane’s original cover art for The Amazing Spider-Man #328 fetched $657,250 in July, shattering the record for a single piece of American comics art set in 2011 by a splash page from The Dark Knight Returns #3 ($448,125).

Online bidding for the Watchmen art begins Feb. 2. The auction will be held Feb. 21-22 at the Ukrainian Institute of America at The Fletcher-Sinclair Mansion in New York City.

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Bernard Chang is giving away his pages from Demon Knights #16

Bernard Chang's original art from "Demon Knights" #16

Demon Knights artist Bernard Chang is so excited about the release of Issue 16 on Wednesday that he’s going to give away all 20 pages of original art to fans who buy the DC Comics series.

Breaking down the process this morning on Twitter, Chang explained his plan: He wants readers to buy six copies of Demon Knights #16, keeping one for themselves and the rest to their friends who aren’t following the series (or ask your retailer to distribute them in pull boxes). But first, take one photo of yourself holding all six copies (like so) and another with a close-up of the receipt and the name of the store. Then tweet or email those photos to Chang, who will call the store to verify the purchase.

The first 20 people to do so will receive a page of original art signed by Chang. Those six comics will run you in the neighborhood of $18 (not accounting for sales tax or discounts); a page of original art by Bernard Chang sells for anywhere from $45 to $175, so you’ll be coming out well ahead of the game. The giveaway begins Wednesday at 9 a.m. PT.

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How not to draw manga: Some free advice

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I’m sitting here looking at a stack of how-to-draw-manga books, and I’m feeling very guilty.

These books were sent to me as review copies, and I feel it’s my duty to review them. They are thoughtfully designed and beautifully produced, and they aren’t cheap. People think being a reviewer is all beer and skittles and free comics, but those comics aren’t free; they carry a serious responsibility with them, and I’m afraid that in the case of these books, I have failed miserably.

The problem is that I don’t believe in the basic mission of these books. I say this as someone who once had aspirations to being a fine artist and who later edited art-instruction books. Let me explain.

When I was in college, I loved the idea of being an artist, but I lacked talent. That didn’t stop me from soldiering through school — I have a BFA and an MFA in studio art — but when I got out into the real world and started trying to make my way as an artist, I realized I lacked both the knack and the spark I needed to be successful.

Nonetheless, I went from being a terrible draftsman to a better-than-mediocre draftsman during that time, and I didn’t do it by reading books. I did it by drawing. So here’s the advice I have for all aspiring comics artists everywhere: Draw from life. You’re better off using those how-to books in an interesting still-life setup and drawing that than copying the illustrations you will find inside.

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Jerry Robinson’s family donates rare comics to Cartoon Art Museum

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The family of legendary Batman artist Jerry Robinson, who passed away in December 2011 at age 89, has donated 60 original comic strips to the Cartoon Art Museum in San Francisco.

According to SF Weekly, the pieces dating back to the turn of the 20th century include just one of Robinson’s own comics, a 1954 installment of Jet Scott, a sci-fi strip about an adventurer with the Office of Scientifact who’s called in to tackle strange threats. Among the highlights of the donation are Wash Tubbs by Roy Crane, Li’l Abner by Al Capp, Baron Bean by George Herriman, Pogo by Walt Kelly and two pieces by Winsor McCay, including a hand-painted installment of Dream of the Rarebit Fiend.

Curator Andrew Farago, who became friends with Robinson and his family, said those are the first McCay originals to be included in the museum’s permanent collection.

Robinson, who co-created Robin and the Joker, and later became widely respected for his work has a comics historian and creators’ rights advocate, was presented with the Cartoon Art Museum’s lifetime achievement award in 2011.

The Hawkeye Initiative puts our favorite archer in superheroine poses

By Noelle Stevenson, aka Gingerhaze

What began Saturday as an illustration swapping the poses of the two heroes on the cover of Hawkeye & Black Widow #17 turned into a challenge Sunday when Nimona creator Noelle Stevenson suggested that the way to “fix every Strong Female Character pose in superhero comics” is to “replace the character with Hawkeye doing the same thing.” Now The Hawkeye Initiative is a bona fide online movement, with a blog showcasing countless takes on the Avengers’ ever-popular archer striking the poses, and occasionally wearing the adapted costumes, of various superheroines.

The results are always fun and funny, occasionally alarming, and frequently very, very sexy …

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